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What Procedure to repaint a Slot.it/Policar

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Seems basic, but couldn't find any info.
I want to repaint one of the Policar Monoposto cars duck egg yellow, for making up a set in lane colours. 
Any suggestions for prep/sanding/other of the existing plain white.
Yes, I agree, I think they should have done plain yellow, ready for camel decals.... :)


Walks upright Unaided  *  Ties Own Shoelaces  *  Can Mispronounce Own Name In Five Languages  *  Mostly Aims Rattle Cans Away from Self
 My Track Oakland Raceway V2     Our Club  HMBRC     

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Hi SlotsNZ,

need to know a couple of things first before I make suggestion.

1 - Do you have an airbrush?

2 - what type of paint are you intending to use? acrylic or lacquer?

3 - are you making any modifications/additions to the existing model?

4 - is the "plain" white the original painted colour of the model, or is it bare plastic?

5 - what is the level of finish you want to achieve?

 

frats,

Rosco

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19 minutes ago, rosco01 said:

Hi SlotsNZ,

need to know a couple of things first before I make suggestion.

1 - Do you have an airbrush?

2 - what type of paint are you intending to use? acrylic or lacquer?

3 - are you making any modifications/additions to the existing model?

4 - is the "plain" white the original painted colour of the model, or is it bare plastic?

5 - what is the level of finish you want to achieve?

 

frats,

Rosco

1) I do, but I am so useless, I will just be using a rattle can
2) See 1  TS Tamiya
3) Nah, just re-colour
4) Painted colour - it's the white monoposto. It is what to do about that gloss, clear-coated surface that is the big question. Do I sand it, soak it in acetone and go hunting for the plastic in the solution....hmmmm
5) Factory or better would be ideal . . . but realistically, anything that has minimal runs, 90% or better coverage, not to many wrinkles and not too much dust in it would probably be described by my clubbies is "some of your best work to date"


Walks upright Unaided  *  Ties Own Shoelaces  *  Can Mispronounce Own Name In Five Languages  *  Mostly Aims Rattle Cans Away from Self
 My Track Oakland Raceway V2     Our Club  HMBRC     

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Ok, answered almost all I need to know to offer suggestions, SlotsNZ... 

 

Whatever you do - do not soak in acetone... it will eat into the plastic and do irrepairable damage.... acetone is great for cleaning airbrushes and metal parts etc... but keep the blasted stuff away from plastic....so too - turps.

Metho can often be used to wash paint off... particularly anything sprayed with an acrylic... 

If all else fails, I have used brake fluid to remove paint from model locomotives that were sprayed at the Athearn factory in the US.... it takes a bit of getting off... but brake fluid was the only stuff that would melt into the paint without destroying the plastic of the model.. 

Be careful if you use Windex around anything painted in acrylic too... it will fuse the paint... 

I don't believe factory paint that the big manufacturers use is acrylic... acrylic is too soft and does not stand up to the rigors of slot car racing/handling.... lacquer is your friend, but it has nasty stuff in it - so spray in a garage etc with plenty of ventilation.. and keep the mist away from you nose and mouth.... and eyes.

Having said that - I've been spraying for over 40 years and have taken very little precautions in the way of protection... still here, still upright and still breathing... sprayed some pretty ordinary paints over the years - but I do take all precautions I can with two pack... keep away from that stuff for modeling... it has iso-cyanide in it... and other stuff.... 

 

The Tamiya TS (aerosol) range are what I believe to be lacquer... they might attack bare plastic, but I haven't had issue with it (yet)... providing you don't flood it on, and spray a light coat or two over what's already on the model - you can then pool it up to get a great gloss finish.

Once you get that lovely gloss - you have to cut your hands off... and simply walk away - most people make the huge mistake of trying to get even more gloss out of it... and all paint has it's point where it will run...... Tamiya TS is very user friendly - but it will run if you go too far... so, once you get the wet gloss look - leave it... close the door and walk away to find something else to do..... and - turn off the lights.... bugs love wet paint... and lights will attract them...... 

TS will touch dry quite quickly.... don't be tempted... leave it for at least a couple of hours before even thinking about looking at it.... and a day before handling it... 

You can tell someone that there are exactly 17 billion 350 million and 6 stars in the sky - and nearly everyone will believe you...... but, you put a "wet paint" sign on something - and everyone wants to test it to see if it's dry.... grrrrr....

Wet paint - leave it alone... if you're happy with the finish - anything you do next will ruin it....... get that lovely gloss up - and stop.... walk away and lock it up.... 

I like to leave anything painted a day or two - then place it outside in the fresh air and in sun for short spells at a time (preventing it getting too hot).... I have found this pulls the paint down better (lets the thinners escape up through the paint) and tends to make the outer surface of it much harder... (bakes it) just me, but I find it works.

 

Sanding - all paint benefits from a light sand....... model paint is no different.

Where we have a difference is between acrylic and lacquer.... acrylic benefits from a light sand better - because the following coat will not fuse (melt) sufficiently into the previous acrylic... so, a very light sand - just enough to deglaze the gloss.. that's heaps... it becomes a physical keying surface for the paint to "grip" onto...

Having said that, I know Tamiya acrylic has some fusing agents in it... it will attack decals... I don't know if this is the case with other brands of acrylic paint.... 

Lacquer paint (like TS) has thinners in it which will actually fuse (melt) what's it is being sprayed onto... so, it will do some of that "keying" for you... 

I have had success with spraying lacquer directly over washed and dried models... without any keying (sanding)... but, me being me - I still like to give anything I want to paint a light sand.... 

Most people get into trouble with painting-over by not cleaning and drying first or failing to sand when using a paint which will not fuse into previous coats....

Paint can "peel", "chip" or "blister"....chipping more prevalent in slot cars due to the knocks and bumps they get... a hit on a floor will often cause a crack - and before long - crap has got under it and it simply chips off..... so, I like to give things a light sand... more grip, and a better chance for the following paint to fuse into what's underneath and then run it under the tap with an old toothbrush.... warm (not hot) water and some

dishwashing liquid.... lightly rub and thoroughly rinse.

I use an old flat paint brush, which over the years has almost lost its bristles... the brush is about 1/2" wide and the bristles are now down to about 1/4"... they are very fine, but because they are so short. they are stiff enough to remove embedded sanding residue and polishing compound... just be careful not to damage your surface by the metal nose of the brush... 

Most important - dry... forced air dry.... hair-dryer at a good distance (way too hot on high setting) and as fast as the fan can pump air over it.... use the cool function and get in really close. Don't forget to dry out the underside...... any trapped water "will" find it's way out and onto the lovely fresh gloss finish on the outside you have just perfected.... so - start clean and dry.. and you're half way there to a good finish.

If you have compressed air - all the better.. but keep the pressure down to around 15 psi.... too great a pressure will have you on your hands and knees looking for parts on the floor...! been there, done that... 

When we come to sanding... we are not talking about getting out the Makita orbital sander and grinding away.... we only need to deglaze... take off the mirror gloss of the paint....  rubbed back to matt is good, but you don't need to go that far .... dull would be fine...... 

With all sanding - the major concern is removing detail.... so, we try to avoid those areas.... and nudge up to the edge of them... 

As for paper grade.... I find 1200 wet/dry too harsh... and go more towards 1500 and 2000.... they will cut fine and will generally not gouge into paint...... I get my fine grade paper from an auto body paint shop.... they use this very fine paper for "de-nibbing" 2 pack... it is great for modeling.. and brings up aluminium to an amazing finish prior to polishing... 

If it gets blocked when sanding - throw it away... don't try to clean it. If you feel anything "rubbly" or the paper does not rub properly - take a look a the surface of it... if you have little spots of paint... throw it away and start fresh... you'll do more damage by "gouging" the paint with this blocked paper than by cutting into the fresh surface with your fingernails... which brings me to another point... keep your fingernails short - they damage soft paint very easily... 

For flat sections.... use a rubbing block under the paper... anything fairly firm with the paper wrapped around it will bring very good results for keeping the surface free of undulations.... 

Use a softer backing block for curved areas.. a small piece of rubber cut to size is good.... and don't sand "across" the crowns - but along them and try to "roll" the sanding over as you go along... it stops ridges forming... like the edges of a 50c piece....

Sanding across the crowns or high spots - will certainly find you rubbing all the paint off very quickly...sanding along them gives you more control.... but only a few passes are necessary to deglaze those areas... sanding flats might take a bit more effort... but once you see the gloss gone - stop... no need to go any further - you've done the work... 

 

Dust - herein lay the biggest bug-bear of painting models...... "anything" will be attracted to a lovely wet glossy surface...

learning "where" that blasted stuff comes from is a life-long learning curve... it seems, the greater the finish you get - the more likely you'll get dust to ruin it.... I never seem to have a problem when I do a "quickie" and simply put a coat of paint down to pretty something up ... covering damage ... but - after spending an entire week getting a model ready for top coats... after putty, primer and guide coats have brought up a magic surface..... when I spray that gloss coat - I'll get dust ruin it.... just as I have with the current Cooper for the upcoming Tasman proxy series... lovely gold paint, clear coated twice with decanted lacquer... and the final coat - dust..... grrrrr it's too late to rub it all back now.. and it's simply going to have to run warts and all.... I'm under the pump to finish this model.. chassis is nowhere near ready and I have yet to design some detail work for the body... 

One thing often over-looked in preventing dust... is the "dirty old me" factor....... you can scrupulously clean, dust and dry an area to paint in... have a model perfectly prepared for paint... and then spray it.... only to find dust gets onto the surface... from apparently "nowhere"... I can adamantly state - a lot of that dust will come from your clothing... so, try to keep arm movements up close to wet paint to a minimum ... and dust yourself off before going into the paint parlour.... it comes out of your hair (if you are like me and struggle to have kept a cranial coverage) ... so, just be mindful you can be the greatest threat to your fresh glossy finish.

 

Lastly - you can polish paint... the Tamiya range of compounding products work well.... but, be warned - rub too hard and you are soon back to the primer underneath... or through the thin clear coat... we only need to remove surface dust and slight imperfections.. we are not giving it a "cut and polish"... compounding paste is a "fix" not a polish... if it doesn't need fixing - don't compound it... 

 

Yes, you can beat factory paint..... and if I teach you how to "judge" a finish - I'm more than likely to ruin you for life..... you'll look at everything that is painted from then on... and none of you models will ever look "good" to you again... so, before we go to that step - think very carefully if you want to be empowered with that ability.... 

For the main, factory paint is good.... more modern paint is much better, but it's more than likely done with robots and baking ovens.... 

I can get pleasing results, rarely get a perfect one - but often find I can bring up a finish to either equal or better many of the larger brand slot car manufacturers.... if I can keep dust away from it... and fingerprints..... handling models, in the slot car world - is not noted for being "gentle" and caring.... everyone wants their car back on the track... and in the heat of the event... not a great deal of thought is put into the painstaking hours of prep and finish.... it's a slot car, for goodness sake.... but, to some of us... it's a model.... and fills both entities... you can have both, but you need to emplace some prevention... your choice of the TS lacquer is probably one of the greatest of those... I have suffered many finger prints on models that were sprayed in acrylic... even with clear lacquer top coats... the acrylic underneath remains soft... and if a model is gripped firmly to perform some maintenance etc... I have noted that fingerprints show up in the finish.... so - until acrylic can be modified to fully cure out hard... I'll stick with lacquer, thank you... just be mindful of the nasties in it... and keep it away from your kids/pets...... 

 

Ok.. that should get us going.... throw some more at me, and I'll answer as best I can... 

 

Not an authority on any subject, SlotsNZ.. but what I offer is the best of what I have experienced...... best qualification in the world.. "QBE"... qualified by experience....

 

And finally, for any modeler.... I cannot make suggestion stronger to anyone wishing to paint a model than to work towards an airbrush... the versatility of being able to spray very fine paint and do detail work is way out of reach of any aerosol... 

It can get expensive, but in today's values.... a quality airbrush is a fraction of what they were when I bought my first little Badger 200 over 40 years ago... and it is still as good as the day I bought it... you don't need a compressor to begin with... but they are undoubtedly the next port of call once you pick up an airbrush... 

 

frats,

Rosco

Edited by rosco01
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Thanks Roscoe, enough information for me to find 40 new ways to muff it. Not the most consistent decorator in club.
- I was kidding about the acetone :) - solvents, surfactants, and industrial acids and alkalis' were once my bread and butter ............ and my steak, lobster and BMW so-to-speak.

And you can absolutely guarantee that about one week after I do this - Slot.it will decide to do a run of the monoposto with a yellow in the range....
It's happened with Skaife in the Scaley Commodore, the Slot.it's red/blue/yellow DTM and a couple of others that don't spring immediately to mind.

 

 


Walks upright Unaided  *  Ties Own Shoelaces  *  Can Mispronounce Own Name In Five Languages  *  Mostly Aims Rattle Cans Away from Self
 My Track Oakland Raceway V2     Our Club  HMBRC     

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All good, SlotsNZ... if you don't need all of the info above... hopefully, others in the forum may be motivated........ personally, I find the modeling aspect of slot cars equally as appealing as the running of them...... lover, not a fighter..... oops.. meant to say - modeler, not a slotter... 

 

frats,

Rosco

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Cheers Roscoe. I didn't realise until I went looking for an answer on forum, that there wasn't a lot of actual background data on painting in a concise place.

If others still care to add more information on different situations, other techniques, tips, paint types etc, we could compile it into a "101" for painting. Kind of like my  101 for timing systems. That would be a very useful resource. 

The NSR 917s in solid colours also come out this week, and I notice some makers like Sideways, are releasing the white kits months before liveried cars.

Anything we can do to encourage people to do more customs painting, liveries and scratch builds, the better we make this resource.

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Walks upright Unaided  *  Ties Own Shoelaces  *  Can Mispronounce Own Name In Five Languages  *  Mostly Aims Rattle Cans Away from Self
 My Track Oakland Raceway V2     Our Club  HMBRC     

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Exactly, SlotsNZ..... 

This hobby has a much wider and more diverse spectrum than the name might suggest.. although it is cars which are predominant, and running them in tracks with slots in them is the main stream purpose..... it should never be concluded that the only facet is racing or running them.... 

I am by no means expert in any of these facets - but my experience in almost all pertaining to this hobby are resultant from many years in it.... along with other modeling hobbies - which I am happy to state that lend themselves very well to each other..

Painting a model is probably the most critical static component of what eventuates as a model.... for the most, it's the paint that people see.... the wheels, tyres and fittings are secondary to what a well painted model can bring modeling into scale reality... and it is in this thread, which I am a little surprised to find - little information has been previously thrown up for members to refer to..

 

Of course, we could fire off some requests to model paint suppliers - I have watched and read many on-line such productions.... sadly, many of them are little more than chest-beating and "like" searching claims at any exacting usefulness.... and some of them, I'm annoyed to state - are unworthy of what they suggest..... 

 

There is a great publication called "painting miniatures" which I have  buried away somewhere in a hard-drive... for me, it gave me very much background and base-line fact when I began to struggle with many of the finer demands.... simple tricks which made achieving a more detailed result without demanding tens of hours in setting up to do so.... it is probably my go-to doc that I reference if I get stuck.... or if something doesn't come up as expected... there is always reason - finding the reason is not always easy.... 

 

I have seen some amazing painting and decal work in this forum.. and hold high hopes that those who clearly show capability - will chime in with the "secrets" held to produce such high calibre work.... 

 

My painting work is pretty basic, at most some finescale masking and a little fine hand brushing detail out.... but I believe I can bring anyone up to where I'm at pretty easily with a little patience and some practice.... 

 

frats,

Rosco

Edited by rosco01
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Further, although I take great enjoyment and pride in scratch-building - I have recently begun to acquire and collect some white kits. My first was a GT-40 from Slot-It, which I found magnificent.... the detailing accessories included in the kit were simply a dream to reach for.... instead of having to create them as in scratch-building... 

 

I have now added four more white kits to my collection - none of them yet commenced. These are all Thunderslot models, one McLaren M6A, one Lola T70 Mk 3 and two of the Elva McLarens... which I simply love. I have only loose-fitted one of the kits, and it went together brilliantly - with only two small locating holes which needed re-drilling in the entire kit. If the remaining white kit models are the same - I can foresee many more Thunderslot white kits coming this way..

 

And yes - white kits as a pre-cursor may very well give indication to manufacturers as to popular liveries... I am certain they watch what we do - and read what we post..... 

I'm also certain that there are many members in this forum who are yet to commit to either white kits or scratch building - and I would encourage anyone with even the feintest of interest to engage.... none of it is what I would call "hard" - but it does take patience and time.... both demands which I also appreciate many are not yet flowered in.... 

Painting is probably one of the easiest places to make a start... all of us have age old and battered around models that can be brought up to amazing new additions to a collection..... always just remember - it's the paint that most people see, after recognising a model.... and it's only the paint that is for the most part - what they see of the model..... master that, and you are well on your way to creating some very highly sought after models...... 

 

frats,

Rosco

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