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Scalextric Digital - Comments/bugs

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As an aside to the great news (well done Drummer !), the latest edition of Model Car Racing arrived last week from Patto's and it contains surprisingly rave reviews about Digital racing. Surprising because I thought MCR was pretty traditional and a little steeped in the history side of racing. The editorial and digital systems review article both say the passing aspect of digital really adds to the realism of racing. Rather than just racing your lane, the authors say the need to plan passing moves mimics real racing that seemed lacking when switching back to analog racing.

 

If the promise of Pit Stop pieces was tempting, Drummer's power fix is a real nudge for me to at least investigate installing digital track pieces before I start making permanent my current design.

 

The only question I have now is whether I can leave the lane-swtching pieces in a track and run analog cars - i know the power base tracks have to be swapped, but can i leave in the lane-changers and the analog cars stay in their lanes?


There are 10 types of people in the world. Those who understand binary and those who don't

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As an aside to the great news (well done Drummer !), the latest edition of Model Car Racing arrived last week from Patto's and it contains surprisingly rave reviews about Digital racing. Surprising because I thought MCR was pretty traditional and a little steeped in the history side of racing. The editorial and digital systems review article both say the passing aspect of digital really adds to the realism of racing. Rather than just racing your lane, the authors say the need to plan passing moves mimics real racing that seemed lacking when switching back to analog racing.

 

If the promise of Pit Stop pieces was tempting, Drummer's power fix is a real nudge for me to at least investigate installing digital track pieces before I start making permanent my current design.

 

The only question I have now is whether I can leave the lane-swtching pieces in a track and run analog cars - i know the power base tracks have to be swapped, but can i leave in the lane-changers and the analog cars stay in their lanes?

Glenn,

as you're on the same side of the bridge as me, you're welcome to pop round and have a play on my digital circuit - just don't expect anything too fancy, just simple, plain fun, and as you read in MCR - you have to plan your race, calculate where you can overtake... and smile when you mess up a pass opportunity and get shunted off.

 

As for keeping the LC sections in the circuit when reverting to analog - alas, the answer is no.

Power between the LC curves is shared across both tracks, if I understand it correctly.

 

I've setup a simple analog circuit in my sons bedroom to compensate for the fact my permanent track remains digital only. :lol:

 

Cheers

 

Mike

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Bring in the big guns - now we are also running the DSE 30 amp power supply and  we not only have a fairly stable system, we can turn the voltage up to about 13.5 volts which really makes the cars perform at a level we are used to and this makes for good racing for 3 (converted) cars.

Dave,

which outputs are you using on the DSE 3800 - sounds as if you are using the full grunt available from the main banana terminals - whereas I'm just using the 3A outputs?

 

Roland and Clinton suggested you keeping the power cable short - my PSU sits directly under the power base, so my cables are only about 30cm long...

 

I will probably also take Vinno's advice, and make some permanent wired connections between each track piece before I finally nail down the track - especially as you've seen a difference adding just a single power tap.

 

Cheers

 

Mike

Hi all im new to this site and need some help

Ive just coverted my 20 metre running lenghth scalectric sports to didital and its running ok but slow was ok before now. tryed to run 6 V8 super cars on it and slow as you can get and im running the two power supplys. also have 5 change over tracks plus heaps of booster cables. need some advice from others that had similar problems. before i changed over it was quick as at the end of the main straight the wall has a few dings in it. I was told the power supplys was enough for this size track but its not.

Thanks.......

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As for keeping the LC sections in the circuit when reverting to analog - alas, the answer is no.

Power between the LC curves is shared across both tracks, if I understand it correctly.

Can a simple on/off switch be added to each LC section to disable the lane sharing power ? I know it sounds like a big job to do all LC sections but it would make it easier to convert digital to analogue and back again without having to remove the pieces.

 

Just make sure you turn all the switches to off before running your cars.

 

Cheers

 

Paul


May the downforce be with you.

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Well this has been interesting reading ...

 

At Mobile Raceways, we're about to install a 100' 2 lane sport digital track in our shop. And I'm glad to have read this topic first, as it has confirmed my fears about using Scaley track again!

 

Even though I haven't played with the sport digital yet! Most, if not all the previously mentioned problems are typical of the unreliability of the Sport system! (sorry to those Scaley die hards!) I'm not trying to be negative about this but here are the facts ...

 

By the way, I am covering some ground that has already been addressed. But I've decided to address this issue in full ...

 

Scalextric introduced the Sports system: a re-designed track surface with a quick connection feature. And the biggest problem with Scalextric on their classic track in the past was the deterioration in power transmission from one piece to the next. In some cases, the power failed altogether (mainly on older track pieces) to between track piece because the connection was so poor! But I'm sure you have all experienced that yourselves.

 

Now we have the new Sports track which has had a surface change and virtually no improvements to the electrical reliability between track pieces as all! As a matter of fact, the Classic track has a lower resistance value between track connections (when new) than the new Sport track. This is due to the new clip in system on the Sport track. The clips do not hold (lock) the track pieces firmly together as well as the older Classic track, which adds to the resistance build up between each Sports section. As a matter of fact, just connect two Sport track pieces, hold the top one and wiggle them! You'll notice how the connection is loose. Now try this with classic track --- No rattles!

 

Here's your Mythbuster ... (about overcoming power shortages / problems !!!)

 

Adding a bigger power supply is not always the answer. The problem lies in the track system itself! Its evident with any brand of track (but with some brands the resistance value is a lot less, thus making it more reliable). You will always have some degree of power loss at each joint (unless there soldered together or are made from gold contacts!). Unfortunately, SCX and Scalextric track has the worst results when it comes to power losses at joints. (I haven't yet measured Carrera or Artin).

 

So what do we do to overcome this flaw ...

 

Do not comprimise the integrity of your power system by adding long lengths of crappy pieces of thin wire. Every gauge of wire has a resistive value. The bigger the gauge, the smaller the resistance. So use the best gauge wire you can afford, and keep the lengths to an absolute minimum. Try to avoid using connectors. Soldering or screw fixing cables will always produce longer lasting and far more reliable connections than "Banana plugs" or "crimp-on terminlas" etc. Remember ... every electrical joint has a resistance value ... so reduce the number of electrical joints to a bare minimum!

 

Next: run power taps (booster cables) from your power source up to each LC section. Then examine where you have long track sections without a power tap, and add extra power taps here. It seems evident from prior discussions that the LC sections probably need good clean power to operate properly, and the poor connections between each track section leading up to the LC section only lessens the chance of it working properly. So hopefully this method will reduce the LC errors.

 

Next: Its also evident from prior discussions about adding a bigger power supply, and how it seems to overcome some problems (but the success level is only relevant to how good the track connections are). But what I've noticed is, that the DSE 3800 is mentioned as the preffered upgrade! Well here's the guff on the DSE 3800 regulated power supply. Did you know that the output current is ramped? What this means is that the available current is low @ lower voltage settings, and the current increases as the voltage is increased. What we sell as the preffered power supply is the MP3090 Switch mode power supply from Jaycar. Its rated @ 40 amps at any voltage (3-15VDC). It has individual L.E.D displays for both current and voltage settings. I've sold heaps of these all over Australia. The recommended retail from Jaycar is $399. We sell it for $299 plus $15 for overnight shipping via Star Track Express to all Aust. metro areas.

 

I'm no expert in the field of electrical wiring, but I've been involved in re-locating many commercial tracks all over Australia (incl. Tasmania, W.A, N.S.W and Vic). I've also been overseas to the USA and met many track owners and examined their systems.

 

Recently we have gone through the expensive excercise of re-wiring and re-powering our Blue King track. And to give you some idea of what we have had to deal with, read on ...

Did you know that a single Open class (Group 7) wing car can draw in excess of 40 amps @ 16VDC during the qualifying session. This equates to more than 600 watts of power. Thats like racing your microwave oven on the track! And thats only one car! (hey thats a thought -- microwave oven racing)

So what power supply system have we installed to sustain 8 high powered group 7 wing cars? We have 4 x 200 amp hour Truck batteries in parallel. They are hooked up to 3 x 55 amp switchmode Bulldog power supplies. There are also 5 x 1.2 farad capacitors installed to ensure we have no AC ripple and very clean smooth DC power. They also help to overcome the sudden current surges the G7 wing cars can produce. So this package can cold crank over 4,500 amps. Sounds like over kill! But sometime these G7 cars can develop problems which short across the power supply and thus deteriorating the output voltage. So by having all this power in reserve, it helps maintain an even and steady supply of voltage.

Now don't get me wrong, we will probably only host such cars maybe twice a year. For the rest of the time our weekly club racing and hire cars generally use between 2 - 10 amps each. (At Buena Park Raceway USA, where they have hosted the USA Nats, Chris has 8 x 200 amp batteries connected to 8 x 90 amp power supplies)

 

This all sounds so high tech, but its still relevant to issues concerning 1:32 scale racing! Even though the numbers are much reduced. Some Sport digital owners will experience greater success than others due only to the fact that their track transmits the power more reliably.

 

I hope that I have contributed something of value to this subject, and will be re-addressing it when our Sport digital track is up and running.

 

Cheers, Peter


Cheers, Peter VH

Mr Slotcar website       MrSlotcar NEW Facebook Page       MrTrax modular track systems      MrTrax Facebook page

Owner of Australia's fastest ever lap time on a Blue King track @ 1.4838 secs. And the fastest pass ever on a 1/4 mile Drag strip @ 203.2 kmh

Designer and manufacturer of quality domestic and commercial Tracks.

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Peter,

great pointers, and I agree - perfect power makes no difference if track connectivity is an issue.

 

I have Sport Track, and although prefer it to Classic, I agree - the connections between pieces should be 'splayed/crimped' to improve electical connections. I wish I had done that when I erected the track, but the thought of taking the plastic burrs off the ends, opening up the contacts a little and making sure everything fits snug seemed overkill. Oh how i wish I'd not taken the shortcut. Once racing, and having had it up permanently for a year now, various sections of my track are suffering power problems - just need to find time to fix it up properly and permanently, despite a couple of power taps. Although I like the track surface of Ninco the least, they do seem to have the best connection system.

 

For a good SSD setup, I do suggest powering the LC's separately. It doesn't matter if you have perfect track connections, the powerbase can't deliver the required current to all LC's simultaneously. You can feed 20, 30 or even 40 Amps into the powerbase, but it will not be able to use all of this to feed the LC's - from memory the limit is 5A. I think a rule of thumb is that each LC benefits from about 2A... round numbers.

 

I picked the DSE 3800, as it seemed to have a solid following, and I'm very happy with it. I did look at alternatives, including Jaycar, but didn't have the luxury of the discounted price quoted above. I have no doubt the Jaycar unit is great, and at the price mentioned is a good deal, but the ramping question on the DSE 3800 hasn't been an issue for me, or any other users of it I know of. If you race at 15V, you have 25A available. If you race at 13.8V, you still have 20A available. I don't race at any lower voltages than that, so have never run out of power. Again, remember that the extra current is only of use in feeding the LC's directly. If you route it through the powerbase, the powerbase can only deal with about 5A, so that is all you will be feeding the combined needs of the LC's. It is good to know that their is another quality aftermarket PSU that has been tried and tested successfully though - more choice is always good.

 

You'll have plenty of fun with SSD once you get that 100' track up and running. Look forward to hearing some updates.

 

Cheers

 

Mike

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Peter,

great pointers, and I agree - perfect power makes no difference if track connectivity is an issue.

 

I have Sport Track, and although prefer it to Classic, I agree - the connections between pieces should be 'splayed/crimped' to improve electical connections. I wish I had done that when I erected the track, but the thought of taking the plastic burrs off the ends, opening up the contacts a little and making sure everything fits snug seemed overkill. Oh how i wish I'd not taken the shortcut. Once racing, and having had it up permanently for a year now, various sections of my track are suffering power problems - just need to find time to fix it up properly and permanently, despite a couple of power taps. Although I like the track surface of Ninco the least, they do seem to have the best connection system.

 

For a good SSD setup, I do suggest powering the LC's separately. It doesn't matter if you have perfect track connections, the powerbase can't deliver the required current to all LC's simultaneously. You can feed 20, 30 or even 40 Amps into the powerbase, but it will not be able to use all of this to feed the LC's - from memory the limit is 5A. I think a rule of thumb is that each LC benefits from about 2A... round numbers.

 

I picked the DSE 3800, as it seemed to have a solid following, and I'm very happy with it. I did look at alternatives, including Jaycar, but didn't have the luxury of the discounted price quoted above. I have no doubt the Jaycar unit is great, and at the price mentioned is a good deal, but the ramping question on the DSE 3800 hasn't been an issue for me, or any other users of it I know of. If you race at 15V, you have 25A available. If you race at 13.8V, you still have 20A available. I don't race at any lower voltages than that, so have never run out of power. Again, remember that the extra current is only of use in feeding the LC's directly. If you route it through the powerbase, the powerbase can only deal with about 5A, so that is all you will be feeding the combined needs of the LC's. It is good to know that their is another quality aftermarket PSU that has been tried and tested successfully though - more choice is always good.

 

You'll have plenty of fun with SSD once you get that 100' track up and running. Look forward to hearing some updates.

 

Cheers

 

Mike

Hi Mike,

 

One thing I neglected to consider, was the fact that the SSD track is under power all the time, unlike an analog track! Thanks for reminding me.

 

Cheers, Peter


Cheers, Peter VH

Mr Slotcar website       MrSlotcar NEW Facebook Page       MrTrax modular track systems      MrTrax Facebook page

Owner of Australia's fastest ever lap time on a Blue King track @ 1.4838 secs. And the fastest pass ever on a 1/4 mile Drag strip @ 203.2 kmh

Designer and manufacturer of quality domestic and commercial Tracks.

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Hi well we have sorted it all out and its running like a dream now and the whole family is enjoying it running nascars and v8 on it and no problems put the DSE 3800 power supply on it as ive already had everything else done before as the track is 2years old just changed it to digital just put more jumpers in around the change over tracks [5]

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Well I've had my digital set-up since about November..Can only set up a small track at my own house since I don't have any decent sized rooms.

On a smallish 5 second per lap track with 3 lane changers and 2 cars running, I would get the occasional overload,mostly when re-slotting cars.I put this down to inadvertantly shorting the braid across both rails when putting a car back on in too much of a hurry.

I took my entire track collection with me to a shearing job down in Victoria where we were to stay in the on farm shearers quarters for 3 weeks. They had a reasonable size mess hall there and for two nights, we cleared out all the furniture and set up a big track on the floor...about 10 seconds a lap from memory.. Sorry I forgot to take my camera!!! Spewin' about that! :angry:

Anyway,I learned a lot from this exprience...

This big track had 5 lane changers and two standard Scaley power supplies in it and we were running 6 aussie super cars.

In the two nights of racing,we only experienced one overload. I wasn't present when it happened so I can't say what caused it but what it did was reset all the controller settings to "brakes off" and it wouldn't count laps..

A quick re-set and re-start of that race and all was well again.

The cars did'nt seem to be surging too badly, but surging can still be felt,especially when the lane changers are busy.

What I have found with digital and six cars running is that it is extremely hectic and some rules need to be put in place and enforced!

First off, you really need to have a "Crash and you are out" rule in place.

I have seen first hand the utter mayhem when you put 6 highly competetive (and alchahol effected" shearers behind the wheel,so to speak! :o

It instantly degenerates into a ramathon!!

As soon as you implement the crash and u r out rule they pull thier heads right in!! They all wanted to win!!

You need to ask people to be polite and not run others off at the lane changers too!! This is near impossible to enforce..

We ran 3 rounds of qualifiying with a points scoring system where the top 4 went into the main,and a last chance qualifiyer that took the top 2 ( we had 12 competitors) we had drawn our cars out of a hat for each race as it quickly became apparant that some cars were better than others (faster down the straights).

I have since determined that the cars are all about the same,but the controllers are not!!

Next I set up an 8sec per lap track at my girlfriends house and had 6 racing,wiith some young children in the mix.

It is my personal opinion that full on 6 car digital is un suited to children below around 14 years of age...I found they just get too excited by the "busyness "of it all and crash constantly...virtually on every corner..

I have witnessed a lot of sulking and squabbles over this..Proper supervision is required and if an individual is prone to bad temper and sookiness..It's best to avoid 6 car digital with them!!

When they have a go on thier own they far much better..

I set up a big 13 sec per lap track at my sister's house and started to really notice that some of the controllers were a lot slower than others

 

Here is that track...

TrackCass1.jpg

 

TrackAlex1.jpg

 

TrackCass2.jpg

I also started to run F1 cars for the first time...

I have a couple of older f1 cars that have the same motor as what comes in say an Aussie super car...as opposed to the long narrow motor that comes in a newer car like a 2004 Ferrari.

I personally feel that the F1's are not suited to digital...just way too fast!!

I have a Ferrari and a Renault with those fast motors in them and the chips and led's fitted in the ready made mounting positions...

Even with the lane change corners set in slow sections of track these cars repeatedly beat the lane change flipper through the corner...That is the car is already past the flipper before it has moved across!!

This is why the led needs to be as close as possible to the guide blade,but with most f1 cars..you just cant get them as close as you do on a saloon car.

My older f1's with the slower motors have this same problem...you can't get the led close enough to the guide blade..but because the are significantly slower..they have less problems with the lane change flippers.

I've got lots more to talk about in regards to all this...I'm going to get the Dick Smith psu, wire the lane changers seperately and perform the throttle resistor mods. Also working on extending the lane change sensor back from the corner by fitting a C 8236 short straight inbetween,complete with wiring and mini pin plugs..strictly for f1 use..(it will have it's drawbacks..If another car is following too close behind a car making a lane change,it could jam up the flipper!)

For now,this will have to do!!

Phil

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Hi PhilR,

 

couldn't resist uploading this switchmode power supply for your perusal. :angry:

$249.00 + freight

 

MP308515amp.jpg

 

9 to15 Volt DC 15 Amp Switchmode Bench Power Supply

 

The unit will deliver a continuous current of 15 Amps from a surprisingly small 1.8kg package. The power supply has an adjustable output voltage range of 9 to 15 volts DC with a pair of illuminated moving coil meters to display output voltage and current. The voltage control has a handy 'click stop' to indicate 13.8 volts which is useful for testing automotive equipment. Output is via screw down banana plugs for high current applications and/or a standard cigarette lighter socket for current requirements up to 7 amps. The power supply has a front panel power switch and 'power on' indicator. The internal cooling fan has variable speed to assist cooling at higher voltages.Specifications:- Variable Output Voltage: 9 to 15 volts DC- Output Current Max: 25 Amp- Output Current Cont : 15 Amp- Input Voltage: 190 to 260 volts AC- Dimensions: 180 (L) x 147 (W) x 113 (H)mm.- SWITCHMODE


Cheers, Peter VH

Mr Slotcar website       MrSlotcar NEW Facebook Page       MrTrax modular track systems      MrTrax Facebook page

Owner of Australia's fastest ever lap time on a Blue King track @ 1.4838 secs. And the fastest pass ever on a 1/4 mile Drag strip @ 203.2 kmh

Designer and manufacturer of quality domestic and commercial Tracks.

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Thanks for the power supply info Mr Slotcar!

Is this power supply better than the Dick Smith one? How do you set one of these up to run the SSD powerbase and seperate power for the lane changers?

Does this power supply regulate the power accurately so that car surging due to say... 6 cars running on the track and suddenly 4 crash... is minimal?

I'm not sure about my power requirements yet..

I am definitely in the market for a high quality power supply though...I'm still in the learning stage here :angry:

I'm about to wire my lane changers seperately and I am currently performing the hand controller resistor mod so that all my controllers max out at just over 5K.

Phil

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thats the power supply I am using for my digtal set up , does the job easily , copes with track power and seperatly wired LC's

@ PhilR if you need any tips or help with getting your controllers right let me know

sax

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Thanks for the power supply info Mr Slotcar!

Is this power supply better than the Dick Smith one? How do you set one of these up to run the SSD powerbase and seperate power for the lane changers?

 

The Dick Smith Regulated Power supply is fine. Its rated up to 25 amps. (of which by the way we also have for sale at $289.00 + freight). This switchmode power supply is rated up to 15amps, which is more than adequate for home use.

sax0067 sounds like he has some helpful hints for you! :angry:

 

Does this power supply regulate the power accurately so that car surging due to say... 6 cars running on the track and suddenly 4 crash... is minimal?

I'm not sure about my power requirements yet..

 

The surging is not produced by the power supply! Its the quality of the track system you are using which will contribute to the surging effect. For example: on the 155' Blue King commercial track in our shop, we have no power surges at all, due do the 100% connections between sections.

 

Cheers, Peter

Edited by mrslotcar.com

Cheers, Peter VH

Mr Slotcar website       MrSlotcar NEW Facebook Page       MrTrax modular track systems      MrTrax Facebook page

Owner of Australia's fastest ever lap time on a Blue King track @ 1.4838 secs. And the fastest pass ever on a 1/4 mile Drag strip @ 203.2 kmh

Designer and manufacturer of quality domestic and commercial Tracks.

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I got plenty of tips on SSD controllers ;)

Peter ,heres hte end result of the parma turbo I got of you the other week, it puts a whole new perspective on SSD , the PCB can be changed so you can alter the resistance to your driving style , I 'm just not happy with where I put the lane change button

dcp51925ms.jpg

sax

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The surging is not produced by the power supply! Its the quality of the track system you are using which will contribute to the surging effect. For example: on the 155' Blue King commercial track in our shop, we have no power surges at all, due do the 100% connections between sections

 

I actually have'nt really found this to be a problem yet... My track is still very new though so the connections are still pretty good.

I do notice on a big track (Like the one in the photos) That when I have 6 cars on they are all fairly slow..not just in certain parts of the track but everywhere...

With just one or two cars on,they are noticeably faster..

I find that when say 3 cars all crash at once...the other 3 suddenly speed up ,often causing them to crash.

Will one of these higher quality power supplies prevent this?

I am presently using two standard Scaley ones..

Haven't made the lane changer remote power mod yet...

It could be that my surging problem is coming from the lane changers being so busy with 6 cars on the track (kids lane change at every chance,simply 'cause they like to...then someone not changing lanes makes the flipper return to position, adding up to very busy lane change solenoids!)

Might have answered my own question here :huh:

 

Sax... Love those controller mods you cooked up mate :P:P

Just completed one with the resistor on the low speed side...

Definitely more top speed ,but a little too touchy for radius 1 curves... (I hate r1's anyway!!)

Gonna try the resitor on the high speed side.

Was gonna do that tonight but I just blew up my power base ;):D

I was tinkering with my multi meter over the track. Working on a car that has ceased to run ( No visible reason) Was testing the car to tryand trace the power flow.

Couldn't determine which was the correct setting on my meter so I set it to what I thought was the 20 volt setting and put the probes across the track lanes to take a test reading..

Big overload... :o

Powerbase didn't recover from that one, turned it off for a while then back on and nothing happens...Lights out and she's all over :P

 

Guess I won't do that again!!

What a dummy :(

I'll have to go shopping for a new 1.5 powerbase now...

Phil

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I actually have'nt really found this to be a problem yet... My track is still very new though so the connections are still pretty good.

I do notice on a big track (Like the one in the photos) That when I have 6 cars on they are all fairly slow..not just in certain parts of the track but everywhere...

With just one or two cars on,they are noticeably faster...I find that when say 3 cars all crash at once...the other 3 suddenly speed up ,often causing them to crash.

 

Hi PhilR,

 

Power surges are purely derived from voltage drops around the circuit due to poor connections. And you've confirmed this (as above) when you went to a larger circuit. Its more noticeable on the larger circuit because the voltage drops increase with more track connections.

A simple two stage experiment ... (without the LC sections in your track layout) is to hook up as many power taps as possible to your large circuit (with Scalextric Sport I find they need to be spaced at least 8-10 feet apart). And then try running multiple cars and see how much the surge effect has been reduced.

If you're satisfied with the result, then introduce the LC sections and repeat the excercise. If your track has noticeable power loss, then your power supplies can't cope with supplying the cars and LC sections with enough power. Then you'll need a bigger power supply.

And if your still having problems, take two Panadol and see me in the morning ;)

 

Cheers, Peter


Cheers, Peter VH

Mr Slotcar website       MrSlotcar NEW Facebook Page       MrTrax modular track systems      MrTrax Facebook page

Owner of Australia's fastest ever lap time on a Blue King track @ 1.4838 secs. And the fastest pass ever on a 1/4 mile Drag strip @ 203.2 kmh

Designer and manufacturer of quality domestic and commercial Tracks.

Both Logos.jpg

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I actually have'nt really found this to be a problem yet... My track is still very new though so the connections are still pretty good.

I do notice on a big track (Like the one in the photos) That when I have 6 cars on they are all fairly slow..not just in certain parts of the track but everywhere...

With just one or two cars on,they are noticeably faster...I find that when say 3 cars all crash at once...the other 3 suddenly speed up ,often causing them to crash.

 

Hi PhilR,

 

Power surges are purely derived from voltage drops around the circuit due to poor connections. And you've confirmed this (as above) when you went to a larger circuit. Its more noticeable on the larger circuit because the voltage drops increase with more track connections.

A simple two stage experiment ... (without the LC sections in your track layout) is to hook up as many power taps as possible to your large circuit (with Scalextric Sport I find they need to be spaced at least 8-10 feet apart). And then try running multiple cars and see how much the surge effect has been reduced.

If you're satisfied with the result, then introduce the LC sections and repeat the excercise. If your track has noticeable power loss, then your power supplies can't cope with supplying the cars and LC sections with enough power. Then you'll need a bigger power supply.

And if your still having problems, take two Panadol and see me in the morning ;)

 

Cheers, Peter

Peter/Phil,

consistent surging at the same part of a track is definately likely to be track connectivity, but when you get inconsistent surging, made worse by adding cars and also notice the surges when people lane change... now that's the proof that you need to make the modification to the LC's, and power them separately - this stops the rest of your circuit from being affected when lane changing occurs.

 

When you have a large track, the overall restance is higher and this does affect the cars speed, until you add an external supply. An external supply will enable you to modify the voltage (typically you'll vary it from 12-15V only) to suit the car class you are running. Some cars I notice run happily at 12V, others barely crawl round on full throttle (ok, I might be exaggerating just a tad). I guess that for the most part, most of my cars run suitably at 13.8V.

 

The good thing is, there now appear to be 3 quality power supplies to choose from, as Peter has brought new ones to our attention that compare nicely to the previous de facto DSE 3800, and all in the $250-$300 range.

 

I love my DSE 3800, and make use of the 2 sets of 3A outputs, to feed the P1 and P2 inputs, while feeding my LC mechanisms and all my track lighting from the 30A output. It works for me, but you've also got positives on the other two supplies too - no need to be a guinea pig on this one, just pick your favourite and take the plunge, you wont regret it, or look back.

 

BTW Phil, that track in your sisters house looks awesome - would make for some great 6 car racing I'm sure.

 

Cheers

 

Mike

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tvwino interesting reading now got mine sorted out thanks, in your last thread you said that you put power directly two your Lc mechanisms as ive got five. How is this possible, do you put a power tap from them then straight to the dse

Thanks

steve

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tvwino interesting reading now got mine sorted out thanks, in your last thread you said that you put power directly two your Lc mechanisms as ive got five. How is this possible, do you put a power tap from them then straight to the dse

Thanks

steve

I used standard electrical (low voltage type) 'choc block' to distribute the wires from the power supply to each of the LC's. Mine are setup in series, which is fine, as the distance between the LC's from a wiring perspective isn't too far. However, on a larger layout, you might want to make the connections in parallel, rather than in series.

 

Here's a 'how to' on the LC mod, with step by step pictures, if that helps:

LC mod - how to

 

 

Mike

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Thanks for all the help Peter and Mike ;)

I will be getting a fancy power supply pretty soon,but now it's gonna have to wait til I get my new power base :D

I'm very busy indeed building a splitter box for the power supply to the lane changers..

It's got 10 3.5m mini pin female ports on the outside of the box that will take power to my lane changers or lights etc.. And a din connecter for the power coming in..

I'll post some pics when it's finished

Phil

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Peter, here's the end result of the parma turbo I got off you the other week. Iit puts a whole new perspective on SSD. The PCB can be changed to alter the resistance to your driving style. I 'm just not happy with where I put the lane change button

 

Hey Sax,

 

When you come by next time. Bring your SSD controller with you, and a schematic drwg.

 

See you soon, Peter :lol:


Cheers, Peter VH

Mr Slotcar website       MrSlotcar NEW Facebook Page       MrTrax modular track systems      MrTrax Facebook page

Owner of Australia's fastest ever lap time on a Blue King track @ 1.4838 secs. And the fastest pass ever on a 1/4 mile Drag strip @ 203.2 kmh

Designer and manufacturer of quality domestic and commercial Tracks.

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Peter, here's the end result of the parma turbo I got off you the other week. Iit puts a whole new perspective on SSD. The PCB can be changed to alter the resistance to your driving style. I 'm just not happy with where I put the lane change button

 

Hey Sax,

 

When you come by next time. Bring your SSD controller with you, and a schematic drwg.

 

See you soon, Peter :lol:

Peter,

Iam on holidays for the next three weeks , off to the gold coast for the first ccupleof weeks, then I will venture down one evening with the old slot car box foll of cars and have a play , I'll throw in some 1/32 stuff as well as some of my really old , drag and circuit ( haven't been run for 6 or 7 years) 1/24 stuff , which will probably really amuse some of your locals :lol: , if you got your SSD track set up you are more than welcome to try the digital parma turbo , as for the schematic if you want it now ,PM me

sax

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