Jump to content
BMR

Cheap Tricks

Recommended Posts

Heatshrink works quite well for tightening up body posts if you can’t find the right diameter tube. Just be careful not to overdo the heatin rate when you shrink the body post. I use the main shaft of a soldering iron.

 

Add to that, the old trick of oiling the thread of the screw, drizzling superglue into the post hole; then winding it in and waiting for the glue to dry.


Walks upright Unaided  *  Ties Own Shoelaces  *  Can Mispronounce Own Name In Five Languages  *  Mostly Aims Rattle Cans Away from Self
 My Track Oakland Raceway V2     Our Club  HMBRC     

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can make short sections of brass tubing bigger in dia by using drills, a block of steel and a hammer. I have a set of drills from 1-6mm in 0.1mm increments, I slide the piece of brass tube over the shank of a drill that just fits then roll it on the steel block and tapping it with the hammer. This stretches the brass and I go one up in drill size until I get the size I need - usually 3.7mm to solder to a metal chassis for a guide post.

 

An alternative and quicker method is using brass tube that's too big and squashing it in a 3 jaw chuck with the required drill shank inside. This makes a triangulated piece of tubing that fit's the guide perfectly.

 

You could also use these methods for reinforcing body posts.


Print It, Build It, Race It, Improve It, Repeat...B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all.

 

I have used a number of methods - brass including drilling out/stretching, plastic rod drilled out, aluminium tube, resin with a little light fibre glass cloth.

 

Yes Kevin I have done opposite to brass and ali tube. Have cut a slot down one side to open to desired size then glued all up with resin. Alternatively if tubing too big cut a bit out of it, closed up and then resin treatment.

 

Another that could be used is to bind with cotton like we do to strengthen wheel hubs then resin.

 

All work equally well. Where there is a will there is a way.

 

Regards Chas Le Breton (charlesx)

Edited by charlesx
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just thought of another trick for guide posts. Wrap copper tape around post if you have some lying around and perhaps lightly solder loose end.

 

Regards Chas Le Breton (charlesx)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another trick is to use silicon fuel line from an RC plane, it expands quite a lot and will fit just about any size post.


A man without a woman is like a neck without a pain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another trick is to use silicon fuel line from an RC plane, it expands quite a lot and will fit just about any size post.

Sadly doesn't stop the plastic post from splitting.


Print It, Build It, Race It, Improve It, Repeat...B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you use the screw/oil/superglue trick combined with something like that RC fuel line or the heat shrink, you can effectively repair the split post to a point where you create a workable screw thread inside the post without stress on the post.


Walks upright Unaided  *  Ties Own Shoelaces  *  Can Mispronounce Own Name In Five Languages  *  Mostly Aims Rattle Cans Away from Self
 My Track Oakland Raceway V2     Our Club  HMBRC     

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all.

 

The methods suggested can all produce a more or less permanent fix. Have never had one break. If you are worried better to strengthen first. Scaly are pretty good but some less so. There is always the option to refill hole and re-drill but best to reinforce as well. That is my experience over nearly 60 years of playing about with slot cars.

 

Other option of course is to remove post and fit a new one. Never lost one of those either.

 

Regards Chas Le Breton

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The headlight lenses from my Cortina have gone awol so hopefully here's a possible answer. Packaging plastic heated against a 70w incandescent lightbulb (it does stick while it's heating but will peel off) and then pulled quickly over the end of a 4.8mm drill bit. The fun and games will be attempting to cut them out to fit in the bezels.

 

DSCF6014.jpg

Edited by Wobble

bram1_zpsfkhrhndv.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great work, Bram.. clever.

With HO scale model locomotives that I build, which would lend itself perfectly for indicator and rear tail-lights - I drill out a hole then water down some wood-working glue (Aquadhere)...

I put a small drop of this thinned glue into the hole - the result is that it makes what looks like the concave mirror of a headlight...

I then color this to suit... red for marker lights/tail lights etc....

Once the paint has dried (24 hours).. I add some more of this watered down glue in stages over a few days until I get the rounded convex curve of the the lens that I want..... the glue will dry almost clear.. with the result that it actually looks like a fitted lamp.

 

Of course, you could fit tiny LED's... and hard wire them..... using a small voltage reg - but, unlike locomotives, application in slot cars is to "avoid" weight.... not add to it, which is preferential with gaining traction on nickel silver rails....

 

I ponder on finding a set of rounded ends over which to form headlight lenses..... I'm certain something out there will either be available - or can be made easily.... you could also incorporate lens "centre" spots - by the inclusion of a small dot in the centre of the post....

 

I also use this "Aquadhere" process to simulate "eyes" in slot car drivers..... drill through the goggles, semi-fill with watered down glue, paint the desired eye colour and then fill the recess until flush with the goggles...... you could make them "cross-eyed" - if you wanted to attract a bit of attention..... this process works better with open cockpit type cars.. but can also be done with sedans etc.... providing the windscreen is clear enough to reveal detail....

 

Food for thought

 

frats,

Rosco

Edited by rosco01

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Body posts - in small r/c helicopters... we break a lot of plastic parts... mountings, frames etc. etc....

One fix is to apply super-glue and whilst it is wet.. sprinkle baking soda over it........ it can also be drilled or tapped.

It's not as resilient as replacing the part... but it keeps us in the air waiting for parts..

 

Sometimes, if the part is vulnerable to stress.... we use some form of skeleton.. usually a piece of wire or carbon rod etc.... and build up the cyano-soda around it.

 

Of course, you could "wire-wrap" the post if it is just split and apply the cyano-soda build around that... prevent it from splitting further.

 

I have used this cyano-soda trick many times in many other applications (like the mounting posts inside this laptop).. it does work.

You can "build" the post.

 

I don't know how it would stand up to a guide post though - I did try it once, but replaced the post with a heavier one before the car actually made it to the track (I don't set up my track very often... at most, 2 times/year), but I do spend a lot of time "modeling".

 

frats,

Rosco

Edited by rosco01

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Wobble. Any round headed screw such as you have used should work. Just fill in phillips head or whatever first although plastic may just stretch over. Just use different sized screw depending on size required.

 

Like your colouring idea Roscoe but a light bit of paint will do same.

 

Our 24hour races required light for up to 6 hours. Constant lighting is good to keep lights on when coming off. Gives marshals about 15 secs of light. I have used wired direct but lights go out with offs which is awkward.

 

One of the Scaly or similar lightboards could also be an option.

 

Our Cortina's always ran with taped headlights and during daytime only.

 

Regards Chas Le Breton (charlesx)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, Chas - appreciate that some events demand lighting.

 

In regard to the "X" of the Phillips head screw - if left, and they follow the indent - they could be used to fine brush black "X"s as often seen in period racing cars... that were taped over for glass security....

 

Just a thought...

 

frats,

Rosco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chaps, the reason I used a 4.8mm drill bit was because … you guessed it … I needed something 4.8mm thick.


bram1_zpsfkhrhndv.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good idea Roscoe but I like tape on outside so glass will not fall onto track. Some were replaced with metal caps as I recall. C Le B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmmm.... the depth and width of the "X" of a Phillips head would more than likely be too big anyway... just a thought.... make use of what is available.

 

frats,

Rosco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great idea Shaynus. Just knock the pin out. You would want an ali one though as otherwise it could muck up weight balance. Regards Chas Le Breton

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could always buy some actual LED's and use them to create further lens over similar to what Wobble has done with the drill bit. LED's are cheap, even if you don't want to wire them in for weight issues they still make nice convex and concave moulds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Johnno. What an excellent idea and they are very light too. Why not just wire up direct for fun. If they blow will still perform lens function. Regards Chas Le Breton (charlesx)

 

PS. Probably some electrical genius will say you cannot do this (wiring) but worth a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Johnno. What an excellent idea and they are very light too. Why not just wire up direct for fun. If they blow will still perform lens function. Regards Chas Le Breton (charlesx)

 

PS. Probably some electrical genius will say you cannot do this (wiring) but worth a try.

 

You can either cut the posts off flush and neat with the LED or leave yourself 5mm and 9mm on the posts, dip in melted candle wax to prevent any possible shorting, then as you say you can wire them in for some fun later on if you wish. Win-Win for the lights and future use.

 

I have found Jaycar, actual stores or online, to be the cheapest for LED's

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can also get 5 mm super-bright LED's.... a lot more expensive, but they throw an impressive amount of light... from memory, you can also get "beam focused".

I'm not sure if they are available in 3.5 mm though... for "fog" lights...... would look amazing on a rally car in dim light...

 

Which brings me to the next question.. and I should really start a new topic.

I have no intention of doing this, but it might fuel some enthusiasm amongst the fraternity..... FPV?

 

In both my r/c aeromodeling and model railways - it has been possible to install micro camera's... not so impressive in model railways, as the resultant footage is simply to observe from a cab perspective the track and layout.... but.....

 

Flying R/C model aircraft... mainly quads and drones thus far.... we are able to fly in virtual reality from the model (more to the point, the camera).

Wearing a set of visual reality goggles - we can fly obstacle courses and also take/off - landing procedures from the cockpit... which is amazing.

We need to have a "spotter" with us at all times when flying this FPV.. for, when using FPV... we have no ability to locate adjoining perimeters and obstacles (like trees etc) other than what can be seen from the camera..... approaching aircraft is one major concern. This "spotter" affords us the ability to fly from the cockpit, and our spotter acts as observer for the "all around" safety and awareness purposes....

 

Now, to it...... has anyone considered fitting a micro camera to a slot car?.... and driving it using FPV goggles..... by golly, that would be exciting..... you'd have to learn the circuit just as well as our 1:1 counterparts.... sadly, I can't foresee that the fitting of two such cameras appropriate - for rear vision purposes....

 

Cameras are extremely light - along with the receiver/transmitter module. It most certainly wouldn't be appropriate for a well tuned model.... but for an old "clunker" which is penalized by its own cumbersome weight.... almost idyllic...

 

Food for thought...

 

frats,

Rosco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes they have, not a cheap exercise though.

It is somewhere on this forum, I think, did a quick search and couldn't find it, I'll have a better look later when I get some time, unless someone else knows where it is hiding.


Cheers Grant

20191120172309-193d8f3b.gif.......................................................20170306174707-b4015afe.gif

Home Track..........Corvette C1 Build..........McLaren M1A Build..........Maserati 300S Build..........Allard J2 Build..........50's Diner..........Iso Griffo A3C

 

3D Printed Adjustable Chassis..........3D Print Projects

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank Grant,

I'm not surprised that it has been done already.... didn't read it anywhere, but to be fair - I have had (another) a long absence from the forum...

 

frats,

Rosco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...