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Well that stand fits in the booth pretty nicely. The diameter of these stands is smaller than the turntable that came with the booth.

 

There are two of them, one is a turntable with clips (see link above) and the other is great for car bodies. Here is my Marauder body (which is still in prep stages - I have removed the various 'chrome' and 'stainless' mouldings from one side so as to match the pic in my avatar, but I have not touched the other side yet). These turntables spin VERY freely, so freely that I think the air pressure from the spray will turn them. I found though that a piece of note paper folded twice and stuck between the bottom and the main part will slow it down enough to not do that. The clips can be adjusted for various size bodies. You can clean the stands with paint thinner (e.g., Tamiya Lacquer Thinner).

 

With the hose on the back of the booth the distance from the wall is enough for the mini compressor to sit back there too on the right, allowing me route the hose around to my right-handed position. I'm sure you could do it the other way if left-handed.

 

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Came across this on Sunday, aldi had them on special Saturday, so I didn't think there would be any left, but found a few left at the store near work this morning, $39:90.

3in bench grinder with flexible rotary tool atachment.

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Edited by espsix

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That is a seriously good deal


Walks upright Unaided  *  Ties Own Shoelaces  *  Can Mispronounce Own Name In Five Languages  *  Mostly Aims Rattle Cans Away from Self
 My Track Oakland Raceway V2     Our Club  HMBRC     

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Bump......

Don't know if it fits in here... but wanted to add a couple of little things I made up which make life a lot easier....

 

Don't throw away your next icy-pole stick.... take it home, clean it and sand both ends flat so that you have four faces to use.

Cut the ends off square then cut up a length each of 400 grit, 600 grit, 800 grit and 1200 grit wet and dry - about 1 1/2" inches long by 3/4" wide.

 

Smear a drizzle of cyano along one "edge" of your stick and place the end of a piece of wet/dry to it... wipe off any seeping excess (hence "smear") and let it set.

Then - a drop on the remaining faces and "wind" your wet/dry firmly around it.

When dry, cut off the excess tail.

 

Repeat with the other end...

 

You end up with four handy little sanding blocks which will get into tight spots.... when the paper is spent - cut it off and re-apply....

 

Another little set of gems I use are aluminium backing blocks.....

 

I cut some 3mm aluminium sheet up into 5mm x 25mm rectangles.

I then cut the same sized pieces of neoprene rubber up - but a bit thicker - thick enough to make it comfortable to wrap wet/dry around within the grip of finger and thumb.

 

I ground the aluminium flat on both sides using an oil stone until all shiny bits were removed - then used acetone to clean it.

I used some Sikaflex to adhere the neoprene to the aluminium.... and left it under pressure to cure out.

 

I have a number of these little blocks - of varying sizes - each made up when a new requirement dictates.

 

You end up with a handy absolutely flat rubbing block - which will effect very flat surfaces in most modelling areas.

 

These are particularly good for "blocking" back paint - to get that dead flat base for top coating.

 

The neoprene side can be used with great result for those sides which are not so flat - and even on both convex and concave curves - rubbing "through" the dips/over the curves in a diagonal and cross-hatched pattern....

 

I am about to make some up using aluminium rod - of varying diameters.... the smaller ones, I will grind one side flat and fit neoprene for ease of grip... the larger ones will be used without need.

 

These will be good for running smooth/straight channels and grooves.......

 

Hope some of this helps.

 

frats,

Rosco

Edited by rosco01

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Hi guys, I'm looking for some Dremel bits suitable for chewing resin and wondering what you guys all use. Any tips or pointers would be appreciated.

 

I'm thinking along these lines but might be heading in the wrong direction - http://www.ebay.com/...wsAAOSwq7JT8bps -


bram1_zpsfkhrhndv.jpg

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Definitely a burr...I use two mostly...a teardrop shape and a reverse teardrop. Sometimes I use a pointy triangular one, not often.

 

For more gentle work I use the diamond coated burrs that come in a multipack and a variety of shapes.

 

I sometimes will put the sanding drum into the chuck for scuffing out a wheel arch.

 

A final tip is to make sure the shank is 1/8"... some are smaller and if you use a chuck it is OK but my flexi shaft uses collets and I am too lazy to swap them out for a smaller one.


John Warren

Slotcars are my preferred reality

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Check the Dremel rack at Mitre10...more expensive but the selection should be there.


John Warren

Slotcars are my preferred reality

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Probably fine for polishing and as it is called "Buffing" but nothing heavier I would think.

I did check my mega10 dremel rack and there was nothing the same as what I was suggesting.....next go to local power tool store.

 

I have noticed that a lot of fingernail shops use dremels....or did I get that wrong.


John Warren

Slotcars are my preferred reality

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😝

 

I have noticed that a lot of fingernail shops use dremels....or did I get that wrong.

 

Didn't think you was that type of bloke John

 

😂

Rossko

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Hello everyone,

 

Many thanks for all the tips etc! Really good information for a relative newby.

 

A few questions if that is ok.

 

I use Scalextric sport track until I can build a shed. 😬

I have a field of Scalextric Porsche 996 GT3R's and I am having fun trying to keep them equal etc, once I am good enough setup the NSR cars and go proper racing magless. So I was thinking of getting a proper setup station etc. My track takes 6.7 seconds for the NSR cars and 8ish for Scalextric type of cars. I would like to go magless as I have a Avant Mitsubishi, it is so much fun. I just want the Porsches to be as much fun!

 

#1 invest in a tyre truer or just add sandpaper to a track?

#2 plastic wheels, true and glue or just true them with the tyres on and mark the wheel and tyre with a marker to see if it has moved on the rim?

#3 best place for a magnet strength tester?

#4 how to measure tyres to order them? I would like to try a few different ones on the GT3's.

#5 I have heard of making the body "float" but cannot get my head around the concept of it.

#6 best place to get the tiny Allen keys!

#7 Carrera cars have a guide that is too big for the Scalextric track, modify them or replace them with another one.

#8 I know there are many sites selling slot cars but is there a preferred site that you like to purchase off if they are a formum member with the odds and ends that you

Need (tyres, tooling, parts etc).

 

Thanks for you advice in advance and if I have hijacked the thread more than a little!!

 

 

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Hi Kingers,

I'll answer what I can for now - some of your questions will be better answered by those with better knowledge/experience.

 

#1 & #2 - Tyre Truer - a good investment, but quite expensive for what they are. Truing the tyres makes a lot of difference to performance/handling etc.

Before you true or sand a tyre - particularly the rear ones, I'd suggest gluing them to the wheel.

If the wheel (particularly plastic) is out of round etc - you'll never get a satisfactory trued tyre. It only has to turn a small amount and you will probably put all the out of round back at the tyre circumfrence... so, glue your rear tyres... if the fronts are a tight fit - you can probably get away without gluing them... but they need to be trued.

 

#4 - there is a thread on this forum concerning tyres and wheels - a spreadsheet has been provided. It states suitable sized tyres for a large number of models - can't think where it is at present... but you might like to type "tyre selector" into the search option.... my suspicion was that it was for MJK tyres.

 

#5 - yes, body float.... you'll be amazed at how much quicker and quieter a model will run around a track when the body floats on the chassis.

For most models - the body is simply a "passenger" on a chassis. If the body mounts are screwed up tight onto the chassis - it can distort it.

Get the chassis to sit with all four wheels on a flat plate and you'll find it will run beautifully. Screw on the body until it's tight and you'll most likely find one or more wheels lose contact with the plate. By having the body "float" on the chassis - it simply has little impact on putting the chassis under any stress. You don't need heaps... you can determine how much float to add by your lap times. You don't want it flip/flopping around so it looks lop-sided but you certainly don't want it too rigid either.... trial and error, I'm afraid.

 

#7 - Carrera cars come with two guides - there is one under the box which has a shallower blade... that one suits Scalextric track.

 

#8 - there are members here who market a number of things - tyres, bodies and wheels etc... It would not be appropriate for me to actually name any of them publicly, but I am open to contact by PM if you would like my opinion.

There are a number retailers who sponsor this site... have a play around with what they sell on their sites and compare.

 

Hope some of this helps..

 

frats,

Rosco

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Yes Rosco, the excel spreadsheet is for MJK's, and the link is in my signature...

Additionally, MJK's are great on Scaley track.

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Thanks for verifying, SR - I was about to type you in as the author, but had hoped you would add comment with reference to Scalextric track.

The newer Sport track is a lot more "slippery" than the old classic. Good tyres with a lot of grip are a must, if you want to run any of the old Scalextric models... just ask me - I had a devil of a time trying to get my '70's and '80's Scalextric models to stay on the new surface.

MJK's are great for this - and, they have been able to supply all my old Scalextric cars with the new urethane compound (or whatever they use).

 

frats,

Rosco

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Wow... Thank you for all the awesome advice. :)

 

I will put it into practise. Start with the tyres and slowly work at each car from there. Really appreciate the time and effort in the replies.

 

Cheers

 

MK

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