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Lap Counting/timing

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Well I've been having a ball running the scaley track, changing the layout.

Money is bit tight, but I'm thinking I need a way of counting & timing, am I better getting scaley lapcounter, or build my own with sensors and run laptimer

 

I've seen many wooden tracks with sensors but don't remember any on a plastic track.

The laptop to run software is not an issue.

 

All this before getting more track, extra straights, different radii curves, extra cars.

 

 

Cheers

Glenn


Cheers

 

Glenn

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Definitely go for sensors and one of the aftermarket software packages. There are a few freebie ones about, and the parts of the sensor cable only cost a few bucks. They have multiple race mods, data saving, they're just in a different league.

 

Software to consider is Laptimer 2000, Ultimate Racer 3.0 - and there's others, but those are the ones I have used.

They all use similar sensor setups - and you can use sensors on a plastic track very easily. It's just a case of drilling a hole beside each slot and mounting the sensor from underneath to be flush or fractionally below mean track level. For that you can use Duck tape, hot glue etc.The sensors can be vissible light sensitive, or IR (infra-red) I prefer the IR smly becuase they are less affected by stray light, shadows etc,

 

There's threads about it here, so do a search and have a read.

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Before you make a decision, will the track remain as a removable item or will it be going on a board? If always removable, I'd go the Scaley lap counter. If going on a board, wait until it is mounted and use sensors and Laptimer.


Stu

 

Old racers race harder

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Slots makes a very good point about finalising ur track b4 adding timing. I changed my track about 3 times after adding timing sensors etc. On top of being a pain in the proverbial to do I also broke a sensor and ended up with holes drilled in the table that needed to be covered up.

 

You also need to fit the gantry to a straight section of track, otherwise a good tailslide will trigger both lanes (bad).

 

Cheers,

 

Steve

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The Carrera lap counter is pretty good.

 

 

If u dont make up a sensor assembly this is the next best option... it has timing to 1/100 or 1/100...i dont quite remember... but i know the scaley lap counter/timer is only 1/10 and its just SO easy to do lap after lap to the same 10th u will regret it.

 

Altho i havent used it yet i chose UR3 as it had the easiest sensor assembly to make. less than $25 bucks and that was with the $7 soldering iron from bunnings... buy Z1951 sensors and do a search on here on that u will find heaps of revelant info.

 

FWIW

Edited by Badbilly

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Dont forget about the DOS based ones, such as SRM. These time a bit more accurately then a Windows/XP based version & you can also use just about any old Clunker PC to run them. The only main issue is that it must use DOS only, not the command prompt that is found in Windows/XP.


south_1.jpg

Catchfence.jpg

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Thanks for the replies guys

 

@Slots, at the moment its been good old fashioned floor racing (taken over the front lounge room), in fact it hasn't been back in the box since I opened it.

Thats probably going to have to change, SWMBO will want the floor back.

 

@Badbilly, good point I hadn't even thought of looking at the accuracy

 

I figured if I'm going to improve, timing is the answer, especially if I'm going to start no-mag testing

 

Cheers

Glenn


Cheers

 

Glenn

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If you decide to go with sensors and a PC. Here's a possible temporary solution.

 

It is possible to mount one straight section of track on a strip of say 12mm MDF about the equivalent of 2 straights long, and run the sensor wires through the MDF. You could cut a channel in the MDF underneath for the cable to nestle into, and hot-glue it, or tack it in place. That way the cable would sit flat, be secure and not be subject pulling on the sensors themselves. The thickness of the MDF is not so much as to make the track layout too "hilly" if you are cunning in your setup of the track.

 

Then the track can be packed up and moved easily. The sensor can be trialled in different positions and on different layouts before you go "permanant"

Edited by SlotsNZ

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