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Icarve37

Who wants to give up their top secret tyre treatment formula?

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21 hours ago, charlesx said:

Apologies to Flippant or whoever if I offended anybody but that was certainly not my intention. Jus expressing my view.

As I said treatment is fine but everybody needs to and be allowed to use. Some methods or products may be better than others but at least everybody has the same opportunity.

No offense taken here. You compared treating tires and adding weight to using magnets and using glue. I disagreed. the RC racing thing was just my normal response to when people say things like "if you do that, then why don't you do this?" usually in reference to digital slot racing.

I agree with the level playing field. If someone discovers an effective tire treatment method that is within the rules set forth by the club or class, then they should share that with the other racers. I understand that keeping things like that secret was quite common, and expected, in other realms of competitive slot car racing... but I also believe that such behaviour is partly to blame for the swift death of the fad and the struggle to re-ignite it. When new people come to a club, get their ass handed to them, and receive literally no guidance from existing club members, it's no wonder they usually don't return... but that's a whole other topic that will never end. ;-)

I'll have to try the limonene on my urethane tires. IPA had an effect, but it wears off quickly. Maybe limonene will last longer?

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Thanks MrFlippant. 

In a competitive situation unfortunately you will always get people willing to bend rules. I certainly try not to do that but there is no problem trying new things. That is why we are still not using the bow and arrow. Like everything though there is a time and place. I just hope that nobody in Tasman Cup or Rally scene is using or has used you lemon based treatment as that would ruin what I see as a fairly level playing field. As far as I recall no treatment is allowed in any of these events.

As many of us have when I got back into slotting inn 2008 my brother had a Scaly track and we raced with magnets. Going to non-magnet then wood a couple of years later was a real eye opener but I would not have it any other way now. The only time in recent years when I have raced magnet was when trying to convert other slotties to non-magnet and wood. Some of those people are now excellent wood track racers so good on them for taking the step.

Back in the good old days there was certainly nothing like magnets that I am aware of in 1/32nd but about 1961/62 cars started to appear with heavy brass wheels. Cars at that time in NZ were almost exclusively Scaly. Personally I later went to foam tyres and oil of winter green or some concoction but very light weight Scaly cars. The opposite direction but still with some weight or chemical assistance.

Cars today however are generally so much better and tyres tech. is streets ahead. The original rubber tyres of Scaly car were fairly hard rubber. Scaly got over this by adding magnets but by then I was racing Karts or yachts.

Excuse me reminising. Slotting is as much fun as it always was so I hope we can keep it that way. I was at a 1/24th event recently and one of the racers told of all the things(about 6) they did to a particular motor to make it more reliable. Supposedly a standard motor class. Hardly the ting to have when you are trying to encourage new blood.

Regards Chas Le Breton (charlesx)

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4 hours ago, MrFlippant said:

No offense taken here. You compared treating tires and adding weight to using magnets and using glue. I disagreed. the RC racing thing was just my normal response to when people say things like "if you do that, then why don't you do this?" usually in reference to digital slot racing.

I agree with the level playing field. If someone discovers an effective tire treatment method that is within the rules set forth by the club or class, then they should share that with the other racers. I understand that keeping things like that secret was quite common, and expected, in other realms of competitive slot car racing... but I also believe that such behaviour is partly to blame for the swift death of the fad and the struggle to re-ignite it. When new people come to a club, get their ass handed to them, and receive literally no guidance from existing club members, it's no wonder they usually don't return... but that's a whole other topic that will never end. ;-)

I'll have to try the limonene on my urethane tires. IPA had an effect, but it wears off quickly. Maybe limonene will last longer?

Yes I find India Pale Ale works well as a treatment for the driver ;)

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Hi Icarve37. Yes I am sure it would work for me too as long as I do not put on tyres. Regards Chas Le Breton

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I hate the flavor of IPA... both kinds. :P

Of course, my reference was to the kind used for cleaning purposes as a degreaser. AKA Isopropyl Alcohol. Just making sure no readers think I actually used beer on tires. :rolleyes:

And don't anyone here worry about me using disallowed treatments on tires. Not only would I never knowingly break a rule in a competition, but also I'm not participating in any of the mentioned competitions. I'm pretty much only a local track racer, and ICYMI, that's on the other side of the Pacific from most of you.

Edited by MrFlippant

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On 8/27/2022 at 4:09 PM, Icarve37 said:

Yes I find India Pale Ale works well as a treatment for the driver ;)

Guinness and Kilkenny work better (for me) :ph34r:


Recovering Slot Addict :ph34r:  *  Custodian of many used screws (mostly loose :rolleyes:)  *  Total kidder  *  Companion of other delusional slot addicts :lol:  

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Like Munter, I race on a gloss enamel track and almost exclusively run rubber tyres. For years I used CRC 2-26 with great success. Now I use a 60/40 blend of good quality synthetic two stroke oil and WD-40. It was recommended to me, works well, and is easier to source than 2-26. I personally think there is little difference between any of the oil treatments that Munter mentioned. On a clean gloss track, I can get near perfect grip using any of them. In my book, good initial prep on the truer is the key to good tyres. 

I have found that CRC 556 works better with harder tyre compounds, like stock Scalextric. I massage it in with my fingers, and put on as much as possible without it pooling at the bottom of the tyre. I leave the wet tyre to dry and repeat the process a couple more times over the next 24hrs. Before and after each race i will massage another small drop of 556 into the tyres to keep them moist and prevent them from drying out. If I'm not running that car very often, I will try and remember to massage in a drop of oil every couple of weeks for the same reason. 

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36 minutes ago, slotmadmac said:

Like Munter, I race on a gloss enamel track and almost exclusively run rubber tyres. For years I used CRC 2-26 with great success. Now I use a 60/40 blend of good quality synthetic two stroke oil and WD-40. It was recommended to me, works well, and is easier to source than 2-26. I personally think there is little difference between any of the oil treatments that Munter mentioned. On a clean gloss track, I can get near perfect grip using any of them. In my book, good initial prep on the truer is the key to good tyres. 

I have found that CRC 556 works better with harder tyre compounds, like stock Scalextric. I massage it in with my fingers, and put on as much as possible without it pooling at the bottom of the tyre. I leave the wet tyre to dry and repeat the process a couple more times over the next 24hrs. Before and after each race i will massage another small drop of 556 into the tyres to keep them moist and prevent them from drying out. If I'm not running that car very often, I will try and remember to massage in a drop of oil every couple of weeks for the same reason. 

Hey Mac thanks for your great informative reply, only problem for me is I'm a 2 stroke nut from way back and only keep castor oils like Castrol R and Castor 926 just so I can enjoy the smell when mowing and trimming hahah :) I guess any decent mineral 2 stroke oil would do? 

FYI i run a semi gloss finish on my track not super smooth or shiny but good grip with rubber tyres and urethanes too and really notice the difference with rubber tyres that have been well trued and given a little softening . Thanks again


 

 

 

 

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Aside from the great feedback in this thread - to share what I have learned -

a lot of people recommend 3 in 1 oil 

NSR oil treatment is popular despite  the price (and now I think about it that tiny bottle is actually going to last a while)

Koala claws are likely a natural oil blend that contains limonene? like what is found in:

Citrus cleaner which apparently is a treatment too although it is what I have always used just for cleaning tyres 

So I guess now I will do some more experimenting, definately try the 556 on some scaley tyres and  -I'll try some 2T blends maybe with the natural oils and see if I can come up with a formula that works great for my cars on my track and when I find that secret sauce I just hope I'll be able to repeat it :)

 


 

 

 

 

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Next time you shod a car with fresh urethane tires, don't ever use your "cleaner" on them. Use only water. 

I expect you'll see the difference and realize that your "cleaner" is actually a "treatment." ;-)

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Sadly the slotcartel stuff is no longer available and hasn't been for a couple of years but the green is the best, I'm down to my last bottle so started experimenting...

 

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Tea Tree Oil works on rubber, as does Olbas Oil, probably because of the Eucalyptus Oil.

50/50 lighter fluid and NSR light oil left to properly mix in a bottle for 24 hours works really well on rubber.

I've used some R/C 1/12th foam tyre treatment for the last 9 months, Spider Grip Green with 20% NSR light oil mixed in.

...currently trialling some bicycle chain oil...seems great so far.


Life is like a box of Slot cars...B)

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