Jump to content
lavenlaar

Anzac Day

Recommended Posts

Couldn't get to the dawn service today, have paused to remember them though.

Thanks for the pics, really helps to give you an idea of the hell that many endured.

7ee1f681.jpg

 

We will remember them.

Lest we forget.

 

 

Dick.


Cheers,

Dick

 

SCMR build thread

Woodbrook Valley build thread

 

"A Man's home is his castle, but his garage is his sanctuary!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be interesting to know ,do we have many vets as members of the forum?

 

Me?

 

Vietnam 69-70.

 

Terry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Of the 1418 crew on the Hood only three survived the action

 

Bismark

 

8caeedd2.jpg

 

Hood

 

8bb9a7b1.jpg

 

Photo of the smoke cloud over Hoods position, probably taken from Prinz Eugen

 

867e49e2.jpg

 

 

HMS Aurora

 

2ecb11a2.png

Gazza,thanks for the photos,i haven't seen pics of thos ships for nearly 20 years,since the old man passed on.Where do you find all this stuff?Any way thanks again.cheers colin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Be interesting to know ,do we have many vets as members of the forum?

 

Me?

 

Vietnam 69-70.

 

Terry

 

Onya Terry.

 

I wasn't called up (indefinite deferment was the letter I received - bit rusted now to be of any future help) but did loose a couple of mates over there.


I can't believe that I wanted to grow up

 

Mount Salt Panorama Track Combined Road and Rally Track built near Salt Pan Creek Padstow - Sydney

 

A quick build rally track

 

2017 WRP Round 11 at Mt Salt Panorama

 

https://i128.photobu...zpss7sqiwfj.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9a885006.jpg

 

367e5437.jpg

 

69a447c9.jpg

 

307648ae.jpg

 

3387fb26.jpg

 

c10ca4fd.jpg

 

7124e358.jpg

 

46ba1d81.jpg

 

1435e662.jpg

 

109b2db1.jpg

 

3838a502.jpg

 

For those of you watching the history channel tonight ..........

 

60f3b3ab.jpg

 

This was in the "Sydney Mail" 25th March 1915


Quickly read this post before it is deleted or i turn grey again

Gary

http://www.facebook.com/Rallyproxy2017

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some more great pics Gazza.

 

This whole topic great to have another read today :P:D

Edited by Ontheflipside

I can't believe that I wanted to grow up

 

Mount Salt Panorama Track Combined Road and Rally Track built near Salt Pan Creek Padstow - Sydney

 

A quick build rally track

 

2017 WRP Round 11 at Mt Salt Panorama

 

https://i128.photobu...zpss7sqiwfj.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

6th Battalion

 

A Comp

d80282e1.jpg

B Comp

6816892a.jpg

D Comp

8b6c24a5.jpg

E Comp

6db8f54b.jpg

G Comp

bc125823.jpg

H Comp

c75cbe4c.jpg

South African Veterans

55685393.jpg

Massed Bands

74d9d6fa.jpg

 

7th Battalion

 

A Comp

8e7da2c4.jpg

B Comp

227d8ef3.jpg

C Comp

548d00e2.jpg

D Comp

b4b70f25.jpg

E Comp

e76841ea.jpg

F Comp

796383dd.jpg

G Comp

b8ba3f66.jpg

H Comp

189b8082.jpg

 

AIF

Total Enlistments .......... 416,809

Total Embarcations ....... 331,946

 

Killed in Action ............... 39,908

Died of wounds .............. 13,601

Died of other causes ........ 5,832

POW & Missing ................ 4,057

Wounded ..................... 166,819

Sick & Injured ............... 88,170

Total Casualties ............ 318,387

 

NZIF

Enlistments ................... 98,950

Deaths ......................... 17,000

 

At the out break of the war the then Prime Minister , William Morris Hughes, announced to Britain that Australia would give "To the last man and the last shilling". With a population at the time of only 4 million, well over 10% of the population and almost half the available male population (all volunteers) were in services, Conscription had been defeated twice and every one was a volunteer but that didn't stop some papers trying to shame others to join up, this one from Adelaide ........

It really is a sad pity that all the "mother's darlings" (or "mother's cowards") cannot be brought to a realisation of the great necessity of helping to keep their country free from an enemy... Oh! for conscription... Wake up young men and think of more than pleasure when the whole nation is bleeding for you and ask yourselves what are you doing in return? Then hide your shamed faces.
......... Total cost at the end of the war was 270 million Pounds and in 20 short years we were back to do it again.

 

Most families lost someone they knew ........ some more than others

8ddda080.jpg

e03667f9.jpg


Quickly read this post before it is deleted or i turn grey again

Gary

http://www.facebook.com/Rallyproxy2017

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The poms had a very subtle way of recruiting ..........

 

f56512a4.jpg

 

b07aab59.jpg

 

7d41ed9a.jpg

 

923d6697.jpg

 

d0a9c3f1.jpg

 

a0853462.jpg

 

d0d7bafb.jpg

 

Through out the war the papers continued to publish photos of the killed and wounded in an effort to keep the ranks full

 

6f78d0e2.jpg

 

The "River Clyde" was depicted as a "glorious action" .......

 

8b8fe550.jpg

 

The real story is a little bit different ..........

 

The SS River Clyde was a 4,000 ton collier built in Glasgow in 1905 and named after the River Clyde in Scotland. On April 25, 1915, the River Clyde was used as a Trojan horse for the landing at Cape Helles during the Battle of Gallipoli. The ship, carrying 2,000 soldiers, mainly from the 1st Battalion of the Royal Munster Fusiliers, 29th Division, and also, but often not mentioned, men from the Royal Dublin Fusiliers,was beached beneath the Sedd el Bahr castle at V Beach, Cape Helles, on the tip of the Gallipoli peninsula. However, the plan failed and the River Clyde, lying under the guns of the Turkish defenders, became a death trap.

 

For the landing, the River Clyde was commanded by Commander Edward Unwin, a former merchant seaman and Royal Navy officer who had returned from retirement at the start of the war to command the torpedo gunboat, HMS Hussar, in the Mediterranean. The River Clyde had a battery of eleven machine guns from the Royal Naval Air Service under the command of Josiah Wedgwood mounted on the bow behind boiler plate and sandbags. Holes had been cut in the steel hull to provide sally ports from which the troops would emerge onto gangways and then to a bridge of smaller boats linking the ship to the beach. The hull was to be painted a sandy yellow as camouflage but the work was incomplete by the time of the landing.

 

Three attempts were made to get ashore by companies of the Munsters, the Royal Dublins and The Hampshire Regiment but all ended in costly failure. Further attempts to land were abandoned and the surviving soldiers waited until nightfall before trying again. The efforts of sailors to maintain the bridge from the ship to the beach, and to recover the wounded, were rewarded by six Victoria Crosses. The recipients were Commander Unwin (aged 51), Midshipmen George Drewry (20) and Wilfred Malleson (18), Able Seaman William Williams (34), Seaman George Samson (26) and Sub-Lieutenant Arthur Tisdall (24) from the Royal Naval Division (RND). Of these men, only Williams died during the landing. Samson was severely wounded the following day. On his return to Scotland he was handed a white feather while wearing civilian clothes. Tisdall was killed on May 6 when the 6th (Hood) Battalion of the RND, made its advance along Kanli Dere during the Second Battle of Krithia. Drewry, Samson and Williams had come from the Hussar along with Unwin. Malleson, who died in 1975, served on the battleship HMS Cornwallis.

 

After the Helles beachhead was established, V Beach became the base for the French contingent and the River Clyde remained beached as a dock and breakwater. Her condensers were used to provide fresh water and a field dressing station was established in the hull. She remained a constant target for Turkish gunners on the Asian shore.

 

In 1919, after the war had ended, the River Clyde was refloated and taken to Malta for repairs. As a tramp steamer, she was operated by Spanish shipping companies for another 50 years in the Mediterranean under various names, the last being Maruja y Aurora. In 1965 there was an attempt to purchase the River Clyde for preservation but in 1966 she was sold for scrap instead and broken up at Avilés, Spain.

 

An account of the action from some one who was there ...... http://ww1.osborn.ws...yde_landing.htm

 

0579ceea.jpg


Quickly read this post before it is deleted or i turn grey again

Gary

http://www.facebook.com/Rallyproxy2017

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just got home from the Dawn Service (Melb).

I took my oldest son with me (8yo) for his first year.

This year saw a very thick fog blanket the city and added a very eerie mood to the event.

I myself have no direct relatives who have served that I know of, but my niece (10yo) was selling badges for the RSL beside her Grandfather, whose Father trained soldiers in Darwin before they left for their deployment (I believe for WWII).

It's my 6th ANZAC Day at the Shrine, and something that I hope both my boys will attend with me in the future.

The kids need to know what sacrifices our Diggers made and continue to make for our great country.

 

 

 

 

Lest we forget.


Cheers,

Dick

 

SCMR build thread

Woodbrook Valley build thread

 

"A Man's home is his castle, but his garage is his sanctuary!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To all who have contributed and shall continue to do so, and to those who remain, thank you.

 

His Lordship's late father was Transport Division. Always among the first in and the last to leave.

 

Enjoy your day boys.


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

_AM_sig_zps00cdfd1a.jpg

 

Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fantastic to see the crowds growing each year with the spectators, very humbling to be an Aussie

 

Lest We Forget


Resized to 83% (was 1006 x 146) - Click image to enlarge

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Me

I myself have no direct relatives who have served that I know of

Actually... I remember my Nan telling me that my Great-Grandfather was responsible for disabling 4 tanks, shooting 16 men, blowing up 4 trains and 5 supply trucks... then they thought "Bugger it, we'll send him overseas!!!"

:lol:;)

 

Seriously though... thanks to all those who have and still serve.

Edited by knoath

Cheers,

Dick

 

SCMR build thread

Woodbrook Valley build thread

 

"A Man's home is his castle, but his garage is his sanctuary!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today was the first Anzac day without my father he served in ww2 on the Quickmatch witnessed the first a bomb drop on japan was involved in recusing allied pow's off the Japanese mainland and various other utterly unbelievable situations we will never see the like of his generation again and we are the poorer for it rest in peace pop lest we forget


Reality what a concept

 

 

V32 member Slightly one eyed Ford fan

Trying to perfect the obscure art of Zen slot car racing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today was the first day I took the kids to the local ANZAC memorial service, it certainaly will become a fixture in our lives. They lost a great grandfather in WW2 as a gunner for the RAF in a bomber of Italy who my son Jack's second name is in honour of.

Edited by Rob

Regards

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3days late i know but LEST WE FORGET,also the 23 young men who have left us from the middle east.Thanks for the you tube vids gazza,Eric Bogle and Andy Stewart always sends a chill up my spine when i listen to those tracks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know it's more than late, but I was in France on Anzac Day last year (Villers-Bretonneux) and thought i'd share some photos of the service. It was very moving to be there in the flesh, and will be definitely heading to the 100th anniversary of both Gallipoli in 2015 and back to Villers-Bretonneux in 2018.

I was over in Holland visiting my family and made the trip into France, and headed towards Amiens the day before. I took my 2 uncles and cousin (who toured Afghanistan for the Dutch) and they were surprised by the patriotism that was shown by even the younger school children from Sydney who attended.

At 3am we left the town and drove to the memorial, it wasnt that bad at all maybe 5deg C, sat down for a good seat (10th row aisle) and Kevin Rudd was the honourary speaker. Estimated 3000 people, realistically 5000 ! no seats left and standing on the sides up to 5 deep.

 

Anyway here are some pics...

 

210081_2071783078588_1365219092_2460202_3310874_o.jpg

 

202024_2071785158640_1365219092_2460213_2094877_o.jpg

 

220003_2071784598626_1365219092_2460211_6461632_o.jpg

 

209309_2071781638552_1365219092_2460196_6428518_o.jpg

 

220396_2071780518524_1365219092_2460194_6247285_o.jpg

 

201577_2071779678503_1365219092_2460193_1002138_o.jpg

 

Thankfully we were only about 300mt away...

210221_2071785958660_1365219092_2460217_6549922_o.jpg

 

Now the weirdest part...

about 2 months ago I started to compile my wife's family tree, and find out that her Great Grandfather fought in WW1 at Villers and was one of the lucky ones to return home....

 

A wonderful experience that you must place on your 'bucket list'

 

Brendan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...