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Hi All,

I recently tested the water and bought a couple of 3D printed bodies. One is Dick Johnson's Fox body Mustang and the other is a EB Falcon,

Both cars have the usual printing lines which after reading many posts won't be a problem to tackle. However both cars don't have the gaps around the doors  and bonnet, If anything the gaps go outside not inwards. In saying this there is enough "meat' in the print on the inside to cut the gaps. 

Do you go to this detail; if so how do you cut the gaps? I was thinking a hot knife would be the go as the plastic is really hard. The other option is just ignoring that amount of detail and just do a good job on the paint and decals.

Cheers Warren

 

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A Tamiya plastic scriber does the trick for me just gently a little at a time.

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2 hours ago, Wobble said:

A Tamiya plastic scriber does the trick for me just gently a little at a time.

@Wobble thanks I'll give it a go. I have various hobby knives at home and this plastic is tough.

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By the time you fill the body to obtain a good finish the door lines will have gone with the detail, so it all needs to be added.The thickness and hardness of these means you may struggle with the scriber to get enough depth.

I have tried another knife and it does work if you can control the temperature, and be careful.

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Phil

 

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5 hours ago, kalbfellp said:

By the time you fill the body to obtain a good finish the door lines will have gone with the detail, so it all needs to be added.The thickness and hardness of these means you may struggle with the scriber to get enough depth.

I have tried another knife and it does work if you can control the temperature, and be careful.

@kalbfellpThanks Phil. Yeah the plastic is very hard. I have a series of different knives and scribes and they struggle to the point where I have given up. I might have a crack at heating a knife and trying it on a part that I can cover easy if I make a mistake. If all fails I just don't worry about it.

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The other option is some of Patto’s latest decals have door lines on them so adding this way might be easier. They may not fit 100% but could be cut to suit. 

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42 minutes ago, Vinno said:

The other option is some of Patto’s latest decals have door lines on them so adding this way might be easier. They may not fit 100% but could be cut to suit. 

@Vinnoyep that's a real possibility. I just got a set of decals for my HQ Monaro build and I am leaning towards it for sure.

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Hiya All,

@Oldschool62 - I recently looked into doing this for the models I've been making, even more so on scratch built models.

My biggest issue with modelling the lines was working out the width and height of the trench so that it wouldn't be filled in when thickening the body to 0.8mm.

Also not disappear after a little sanding and a few coats of paint

There is a number of ways to do the lines, depending which software you are using and if the model is a Solid object or a 3D Mesh.

After a little trial and error I found that working with a full 1:1 size model, the gap = 40mm and the depth = 30mm

A couple of examples below.

Note the March 717 has the gap and depth at 50mm (too harsh), while the Sting GW1 has the gap and depth as above.

March:

fklCpj.jpg

Sting

fklTCB.jpg

Cheers

NimROD

My apologies Gents, I read it as you had the 3d files, as well as the bodies.

If the bodies don't work out, pm me, I'm sure I could find the models, fix them and print them for you.

Cheers

NimROD 

Edited by NimROD444
My bad
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A friend on another forum mentioned attaching a #11 blade to a soldering iron. The heated blade is used to cut and smooth out 3D prints.

You could also try a razor saw.

cheers

DM

 

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