Jump to content
rosco01

Scalextric A9-X

Recommended Posts

Hi folk,

hope I'm not stealing OP's thread?.... 

My two A9-X's arrived yesterday - by golly, that bumper was the first thing I saw...even before I opened the box.

Having two, and with the decision to attack one and tune it - I decided the first blow would be to the bumper. By golly, is that sucker a mongrel to get out.

I started with a Dremel and a fine engraving bit - taking away the "meat" of the bumper mount from inside. Word of warning!.... be very, very careful around the top of the mount - it didn't take much to creep into the headlight surround - I have a little bit of repair work to do in there, but it's nothing concerning - a pin head dab of putty and some black acrylic will all but repair it.

 

After some 20 minutes, taking away what I believed should have been the cemented posts into the body - it wouldn't budge... and I wasn't game enough to go any deeper.

So, grabbed the finest and sharpest scalpel blade I could must and started to "backwards" scrape between the body and the bumper - which eventually brought success.

 

I filed out the aperture in the body to a rectangle shape - then make up some laminated styrene card blocks to fill the holes.

 

So, here we have the bumper removed with the two apertures filed out (excuse rough fibres)..

 

001-front-mail.jpg

 

002-inner-front-mail.jpg

 

 

Next up, filed back the mounts on the bumper to square in line.. then will mount the blocks to them.... insert them in the apertures - and cement them in place... 

This is what the bumper mount shape is.... after grinding away what is inside the aperture. 

 

003-bumper-mount-mail.jpg

 

I still don' t know why the bumper was fitted inclined - there does not appear to be any reason for it - maybe the post was molded at an angle - I don't know ... I ground all of mine off in the process of getting the bumper out.

 

And this is the slot I ended up with.... 

 

004-bumper-slot-mail.jpg

 

Outside....

 

005-bumper-slot-mail.jpg

 

I will post some more up after re-fitting the bumper in place - I am undecided whether I'll grind out the lower radiator aperture under the bumper... I'm not a great fan of "faux" openings... this one shouldn't be too hard to do... not touching the grille.

 

And - take a bow, Scalextric - those windscreen wipers .... by golly, why oh why didn't you fit something similar to the Falcon GTHO series - those wipers are atrocious... perhaps they were listening here, folk...?

 

frats,

Rosco

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok...... more done - bumper mount inserts fitted and lower radiator intake filed out.

Just whilst I have the mic - I have the body apart, the interior weigh a massive 11.79g and the body without it but with glazing - 22.6g - the overall body weight increases by over another 50% when the interior is added... I'll be "trimming some fat" from mine..... not happy with PB either - does anyone make a head for PB? I can fashion a helmet for the era to fit.

 

Pix...

 

006-bumper-mounts-fitted-mail.jpg

 

I filled in my little oopsie and painted the filler white....... also painted the top of the styrene mount blocks black so that they will not be seen when the bumper is fitted.

 

Internal - painted the area black to conceal my work..

 

007-bumper-mounts-internal-mail.jpg

 

 

frats,

Rosco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok folk,

Bumper job done... plus grinding/cajoling out the lower radiator intake.... 

Front - 

008-bumper-fitted-front-mail.jpg

 

Top - 

010-bumper-fitted-top-mail.jpg

 

Side -

009-bumper-fitted-side-mail.jpg

 

I believe I have got location, placement and angle pretty close - with the "rib" of the channel in the bumper running parallel to the skirt of the body, and the amount of set-out from the front just enough to be able to see the very feintest of gap between the body and the rear of the bumper...

 

I have now to trim Patto's water-slide Marlboro decals then a final light clear coat to finish the body... 

 

With #2 A9-X - my intention now is to simply "slice" away at the bumper mount from underneath.... again, my preferred method is to use a fine pointed very sharp scalpel blade and draw it backwards along the cut - having first made a very careful "forward" cut to mark the line.... 

I'll keep gouging this out with the blade until the bumper can be angled level... then cement it in place.

 

I am using a new-to-me cyano - which is working a treat on plastics.... 

"Tarzan's GRIP ShockProof Super Glue...."rubber toughened".... it seems to be able to get a hold of differing plastics that I have always had trouble with.

Further - although the title suggests it's flexible - it really doesn't seem so - but I have not broken anything off by knocking it yet.... it might just be a winner for our slot car application.

Bought mine from the Big Red Hammer store - bit exxy.. but........ if it works.......

 

frats,

Rosco

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great write up and great result Rosco.

Can't help but think quality control was asleep at the wheel when inspecting the pre production version, or they weren't aware of what the actual car looked like

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any chance of a photo of the chassis from above showing the motor, axles etc? Seen photos of the car from underneath, but not from "inside"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure, Shaynus... give me a couple of hours.... I'll show one of the "collector" version, which I won't touch - and one that I've had a "fiddle" with.... 

I'd have liked a cross-axle mounted motor - and a motor with a bit more bulk to it than what Scalextric fitted.. it's a long can slim line motor - with a very long shaft to the crown.... currently in my "plan" box.... I'd like to fit a Flat 6 to it with a Slot-It rear axle assembly.... I'll do a bit of work and let you know.

 

There must be a "glut of oil at Scalextric - I have soaked up and wiped out a gallon of light oil from the chassis... even a pool of it under the motor and magnet... 

There is a lot of tightening up of axle bushes and guide pin to do yet.... the axles are coated in a gloss black - I don't yet know if they are steel or aluminium... they run in loosely fitted nylon bushes at rear... and simply push through holes in the chassis at the front.

What is good about this Scalextric model - is that the alignment and mesh of the driveline is very good... as opposed to my L-34 when I got it... this model runs freely along a set up plate quite happily... I don't believe I'll have to "re-learn" the plastic chassis in this one - all four wheels seem to sit on the set up plate quite well.

There is very little clearance from the rear tyres to the body... I have chopped away some of the chassis to create body float... and may have to fit a very thin washer just to ensure that the top of the rear tyres does not foul the body wheel arch flares... no evidence of it yet.. but it must be close.. 

There isn't any dash instrument detail.. just a black dash..... the interior is all a "buff" brown/beige color.... grinding into it reveals a black plastic - so, it's been painted that colour.

I'm not sure yet how much "interior" was necessary in the "series production" rules at the time.. I may very well be allowed to hack further into the interior... 

I have an almost finished model which almost balances equally on both axles... am yet to run it on a track and see how it runs - but I believe it will be a heck of a lot better than the L-34 -which I was very disappointed with - befitting the proto-type.... I am hoping for something exiting with the A9-X - if it follow the same parallel.... 

I have reduced a lot of weight out of the "running" model.... all up - I'm down to 76.9g..... I removed and re-wired the DPR parts and lid as well, and have simple connections from the pick up to the motor, then from the motor to both the LED boards front and rear.... It's a no-brainer to do this mod, if you aren't going digital..... the green lead from the pick up becomes the red positive input to the motor... the yellow lead becomes the black negative one.... the onboard "socket" simply bridges the yellow to black, and green to red.... 

Obviously, with a digital card.... the yellow and green are supply - the red, positive to the motor and LED's and the black likewise negative..... with a bit of electronic wizardry for the chip to tell the leads what to do.... and signal back down the line to the controller... 

 

At this point in time, I have no intention of going digital.. I have a number of cars which can - and one which has the chip in it if I ever want to go visit a digital track... 

 

Ok... back later with some pix...

 

frats,

Rosco

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, thought I'd get this done before I get lost outside in the garage and forget...

Just took a handful of pix - pretty much should cover all of this...

First up - the factory positioning of the bumper....

 

01-factory-bumper-mail.jpg

 

And my modified positioning... some might believe that it's actually now pointing downwards - but if you look at the rear of the model - you'll also see that it optically seems to be doing the same at the back end.... 

 

02-modified-bumper-mail.jpg

 

Here is my #2 car - the chassis and body as mounted at the factory - I will not mess with this car, other than decals and that blasted front  bumper...

03-factory-chassis-ext-mail.jpg

 

Here is what I ended up with so far with #1 car.... magnet gone, DPR socket and panel gone, chassis trimmed for body float.... 

 

04-modified-chassis-ext-mail.jpg

 

This is where I have got to so far with the interior hacking - with the body mounted on the chassis, only looking down through the windows to the floor reveals anything missing... 

But the hack has made a big difference to overall weight of the car...

 

05-modified-interior-mail.jpg

 

And here we have my "modified" chassis - DRP socket and leads gone... everything shortened and trimmed to length.. 

 

06-modified-chassis-int-mail.jpg

 

And here it is as it comes out of the factory - oil still present in this model.. but I did wipe away a pool of it under the crown - obviously, the running of the driveline was tested at the factory - I doubt that I'll ever run this model... even as a comparison to #1.

 

07-factory-chassis-int-mail.jpg

 

And - as stated - Scalextric got the chassis of this one right - both my models sit perfectly flat on the set up plate... you can see in this pic that all four wheels sit nicely on the plate.... I am yet to true the wheels, then glue the tyres and true those up ..... along with setting the bushes in the chassis - I'm really hoping this model will be ever so much better than the L-34 has been.... 

 

08-set-up-plate-wheels-mail.jpg

 

Hope that just about covers it.... decals to come yet too - that will make a great difference to the look of the model... and I have to do something about PB - the driver in this model is nothing like him... probably closer to Jim Richards - which may very well have been the subject...

 

frats,

Rosco

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Rosco,

Nice work mate. Nice to see how the Torry goes.

 

Rosco I have been looking for a build plate for a while.

Can I ask where did you get the Precision Slot build plate from.

 

Thanks,

Paul 

 


Try Harder, if you dont fail your not trying hard enough

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Paul,

I bought it from the US - terribly expensive... when I find the details, I'll add them here.

Chap was excellent to deal with, when he found out what the shipping and exchange rates ended up costing me - he threw in a few extra bits.

The plate is very heavy ceramic - so that you can solder away to your heart's contents.... might scorch it, but shouldn't damage it.... and, being ceramic - won't suck the living daylights out of your soldering iron absorbing heat from the metal... 

He suggested I get the wire bender as well - which I did.... and I also ordered a fair few extra stainless pins.... from experience, finding rod or pins to nicely fit into factory made accessories like this is very difficult - ok if you only want to be "close" - but I like things to fit as the designer intended.... removes a lot of the "moving" issues we have when soldering.

I also ordered the wheel chocks (set up blocks)... they allow the chassis to be positioned at the height of the tyres.. or wheels, whichever way you choose to assemble your model.

frats,

Rosco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Paul,

here's the contact for Precision Scale Slot - there is a link to the website in there as well....

http://www.pslotcar.com/contact.html

The set up plate I purchased is on page 3.... #2201 - Metric 1/32... don't be fooled by the cheap $79.95 price - my package ended up costing me over $300 delivered.

 

frats,

Rosco

Edited by rosco01
append

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rosco thanks for the reply.

Seems if you  want to build a chassis you  need this.

I have tried to drill off an Ally plate 10mm thick. Is not close enough when you  get down to scale. 

 

Thanks again,

Will chase him up.

Paul 


Try Harder, if you dont fail your not trying hard enough

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul,

others here have the same plate as mine - I know of one chap who has only used it once, and now uses a piece of MDF for simplicity....

I also have a "jeweller's tile"... ceramic and full of little holes you can poke a small brad into to keep axles etc in place - I built my first two Cooper scratch-builds on that.

However, I never see to have to justify any exhorbitant expense when it comes to hobbies.... and this Precision Scale Slot one caught my eye pretty quickly.. 

My first construction on it is the LC and LJ scratch builds.... I have a thread in this forum (if you have 6 months to read it)... so far, it has more than done what I wanted it to.

But - you will find this to be a very, very expensive outlay for the amount of time you'll probably sit at it ..... and a number of less expensive options are available..

 

For me, I'm more than happy with the outlay - being able to solder on it and keep everything in place - plus use it as a set-up plate... well, think you get the picture... 

 

I am yet to use the wire bender - but believe that will come into it own when I go to bend piano wire to the exact shape.... pliers and a small vice are great, but can not possibly give the control of being able to pull around a dowel to a marked angle when released........ much easier than bending and measuring angles in and out of a vice... 

Just as an aside - I have been messing around inside the chassis of the A9-X.... with a Flat 6R motor.. it will fit, but there's going to be a fair bit of "making room" for it.

I'll post up some specs and pix .... don't know what's going on with PostImage at the moment - I can't get in.. and my pix in this thread have all disappeared... hope it's just a case of the site being down at present - I got away from another imaging host because it wanted money, and locked away everything I had put up for years.... hope this is not the case with PostImage.... grrrrrr

frats,

Rosco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok folk,

I've been swamping (overtaking) Vinno's review thread on this model, and believe I should honor his review by starting one of my own - on my modifications to one of my two PB A9-X's.

With permission (moderators) - I'll copy/paste a bit of what I put up in Vinno's thread... and continue on here as from today... 

I am also having issues with accessing PostImage... it won't let me log in, I have put quite a bit up at that hosting site... maybe there is a limit. I got away from Photobucket because it wanted money... and may yet have to find another host if this is the case here... so, no pix with this.

 

Back soon, with an update - lots to tell... for Scalextric, this model is the best overall finish and set-up I have seen from them for many years.... well done.... although, a few things could easily be fixed to make it a much better model again - like that blasted front bumper bar... and the tiny motor fitted, when there is plenty of room for a sidewinder flat can...... or just a larger in-line motor.

The prototype for this model was a rocket - surely, it is fitting to have performance to match..... 

 

frats,

Rosco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Shaynus - I can see the posted ones as well.... now - but still can't log in... more work done on the A9-X today, pix taken but not uploaded due to log-in issues.

 

frats,

Rosco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Rosco

Yeah might be an idea, I think I should be able to move your stuff if you want. Call yours a tuning thread or something like that. 

Regards Vince

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Vince - much appreciated if you can move it - I'll then go through and edit from within my own thread - apologies for swamping your thread.

 

frats,

Rosco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, thanks Vinno - my previous comments and pix on Vinno's review of this model have been moved to this thread, so - we'll go on from here.

Spent yesterday morning picking out the first two of four "Marlboro" decals .... these are the large ones which go on the sides.. yet to do the mid one for the front and small one for the rear.

 

001-decal-trimming-mail.jpg

 

I'm off to my LHS shortly to pick up some MicroSol and MicroSet to apply them... and some clear coat.

 

In the afternoon, I removed the rear axle assembly and fitted it up to the tyre/wheel truer.... 

 

This is what I started out with, the wheels were pretty good ex factory - but of course were out a bit.... 

 

03-rear-wheels-on-truer-mail.jpg

 

And took them down on each of the three tyre faces until they were true....

 

04-wheels-trued-mail.jpg

 

I painted some water based adhesive to both the wheels and tyres then fitted them..... and bedded them in by running the assembly over the set up board to spread and balance out the glue whilst it was still wet.... I'll refit the axle to the truer today and true up the tyres.

For now, I'm going to run this model using the factory motor, axle, wheels and tyres... 

 

However, whilst I had the rear axle out - I popped out the motor and trial fitted the Flat 6R.... 

 

01-Flat-6-R-motor-mail.jpg

 

There's plenty of room for it under the interior - but there will have to be some chomping away at both the centre beam and also the very heavy and chunky seat bases... 

 

02-interior-for-Flat-6-trim-mail.jpg

 

By comparison - the differences between the factory and Flat 6R motor....

Factory = length (can) - 27.0mm, width - 15.5mm, height - 11.9mm, weight - 17.8g (with nylon pinion).

Slot it Flat 6R = length (can) 32.5mm, width - 20.5mm, height - 13.0mm, weight - 31.3g (no pinion).

 

This Flat 6R motor will be fitted to the current LJ XU-1 project... it may very well be a bit "hot" for the model... and I may very well have to choose a less powerful alternative... 

If this is the case, I will probably likewise do so for this A9-X... but until I finish the LJ - I won't be making any changes to the factory motor or driveline in this model.... 

 

frats,

Rosco

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok folk,

bit more done..... car is now track ready.... as follows -

Rear tyres glued with water based contact adhesive - then trued up.

 

0001-rear-tyres-trued-mail.jpg

 

Radius made on outer tyre edges...

 

0002-outer-radius-mail.jpg

 

Then I had some serious thinking to do - the front axle/wheels/tyres.... whether to true them up or not.

In this model, the axle does not run in nylon bushes - but is pushed through a hole each side of the chassis - a bit of a disappointment.

I had to decide on whether to remove a wheel - which I hate doing with platic wheels - or to cut into the chassis and remove the axle assembly intact...

I chose to cut the chassis - and came up with a way which may prove useful to others who also do not want to pull wheels from axles..

I used a Dremel and cut a "keyhole" into the top of each side of the chassis. The axle was then able to be "sprung" out... intact. Not interfering with the circle chassis bush of the hole except for a small segment above the axle..... just enough to flex the chassis apart to free it....

 

With the axle out - I sanded off the black paint from the steel axle..... and loaded the assembly into my wheel truer...

 

0003-front-axle-mail.jpg

 

In this pic, you can see the small amount of cut-away in the chassis....

 

0004-front-axle-chassis-slots-mail.jpg

 

From the side...

 

0005-front-axle-chassis-slots-mail.jpg

 

And here we have the front axle assembly in the machine - truing down the wheels and then tyres... again, gluing them to the wheels using water based contact adhesive.

 

0006-front-tyres-trued-mail.jpg

 

The front axle has been re-fitted and the chassis set up on the plate.... I have set the height of the front axle here.... and am about to make up some styrene card retainers for the inside of the chassis axle hole...

 

0007-trued-tyres-set-up-plate-mail.jpg

 

On the plate - from the front..

 

0008-tyres-on-setup-plate-mail.jpg

 

In this pic, you can see that I have fabricated some axle retainers... in the same style as that cut into the chassis - except, they are mounted inverted.

I used two laminations of 0.030" styrene card on each side... the axle "runs" in the hole .. which also lines up with that in the chassis - so,  in effect - we have twice the thickness of plastic for the axle to use as a hard fitted bush..

 

0009-front-axle-keeper-plates-mail.jpg

 

With the axles, wheels and tyres all now set up on the plate - I now turn my attention to the terrible guide arrangement.. i simply don't like these "quick change" guides that Scalextric have taken a liking to use..... they flop all over the place... but, the saving grace is that the guide hole in the chassis is square to the set up plate.... so, we don't have to go and re-invent the post holder... pic....

 

0010-guide-turntable-mail.jpg

 

And here is the top of the guide - you can see the molding pips in it - they result in a lot of the "wobble" these guides make .... but not all of it...

 

0011-guide-table-face-mail.jpg

 

In this pic, you can see that I've been in with some wet/dry and a rubbing block... removed the pips and left a nice flat turntable for the guide to pivot on...

 

0012-guide-table-face-sanded-mail.jpg

 

 

Next up - you can see the terrible amount of "post" that protrudes up through the post hole.... fitting the retaining screw leaves way too much clearance and the guide flops all over the place - up and down, tilting forward and back - and side to side...... I filed the top of the post so that the flat head of the retaining screw was an almost clearance free fit.... the guide now has barely any wobble or float in it.... 

 

0013-guide-post-top-mail.jpg

 

I simply don't like this arrangement - but for club purposes - left it in there instead of replacing it with a Slot-It guide.... 

I detest the contact strips, which are sandwiched between the top of the braid and the turntable of the chassis.... Scalextric have completely lost the "KISS" principle here - but, I must say - it makes for quick changes of braid - not that any track owner should maintain their track so that people have to change braids often.... grrrrr

 

0014-pick-up-contact-plates-mail.jpg

 

And the Quick Change braid assembly..... it slides over the rear of the guide blade and pushes back once in position to retain it.... more room for things to "move" that should be firm and secure....

 

0015-pick-up-plate-mail.jpg

 

As stated, I don't like this - if anything can go wrong - it will.... and will usually do so at a critical opportunity.

We can clearly see here the "sandwich" of the contact plate making contact with the top of the braid.... I much prefer the simple Slot-It alternative where an eyelet is pressed into the front of the guide.... and we have direct contact between the motor power lead and the braid.... 

 

0016-pick-up-rails-mail.jpg

 

The guide is now fitted to the chassis - and you can see that all five contact points (four tyres and braid) are all in the same plane on the set-up plate..

 

0017-braid-contact-mail.jpg

 

Ok, here's a little gem that I stole from my r/c helicopter hobby.... secret weapon for "lubricating" plastic on plastic....... 2B greylead pencil..... graphite, in short - but not in powder form... just a "wiping" of it on the mating surfaces.

it neither attracts fluff/grit/crud nor goes hard... or ever seems to wear off..... it's lighter than can be measured and simply works a treat.... just "color in" the mating surfaces for a treat and forget option to any other form of lube...

 

0018-grey-lead-lube-mail.jpg

 

Ok - as far as I am prepared to go for now - the model is track ready.... I have run the motor with the model inverted for a few hours - and it now runs very sweetly indeed.. the first two hours were just at 3v... then a bit of up and down the register to 6V for the next hour whilst beavering away on another project.

When I first ran the model on the bench, it took nearly 1.5V for the motor to turn the rear wheels.... after this bench running - it now begins to turn the rear wheels at just 0.5v and it will maintain that constant turning at this low voltage without any hesitation or fluctuation..... as stated, the next bit is to put some track together and give it a bedding in on its own four feet...

 

0019-track-ready-mail.jpg

 

And finally, we come to another secret weapon I employ - we go to an awful lot of effort to true up wheels and tyres.. then screw the model down onto the floor of a jewel case - not me!

I make up some spacers to fit under the chassis - so that when the model is screwed down - the tyres are up and away from the floor of the case.... so too, the braid... 

 

0020-storage-blocks-mail.jpg

 

I have yet to start applying Patto's decals - when I get my mitts on some Microsol and Microset (coming from WA, and the Isle of Wight at present).... 

 

So, for now - probably put this thread on hold until I have some more pix of the completed model - or, I get off my butt and put some track together...

 

frats,

Rosco

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great Review Rosco,

 

I was so impressed with your initial comments, I decided to get myself one, even though I was not impressed with their earlier 4-door version of the Torana.

It was rather disappointing out of the box, but once I trued up both the front and rear tyres, it was a completely different beast. Cannot believe how badly out of round the wheels & tyres were, particularly the front, which I normally don't worry too much about. But as you pointed out, with the axle fixed in position and the tyres level with the guide, it literally bounced all over the place once it picked up any speed. But it ran extremely well on my non-magnet timber track, once the tyres were fixed. Certainly much better than the 4 door, maybe even better than my own resin 4 door on a PCS chassis. I might actually add some lead strips to the chassis just to get the CoG a little lower and improve the grip levels as its a bit tail happy.

Cheers,


Graeme

~~~~~~

 

(Life is like a sewer....................What you get out of it depends on what you put into it!)

 

My Website

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Graeme,

as stated, I'm yet to put mine on a track.... but, I believe I've got it set up as best it can be without altering anything... 

The rear tyres would be the first place I'd go to improve performance - once all axles and wheels were set in the same plane.. 
i'd be tempted to chuck away the "quick change" guide as well - and fit a Slot-It one... they'd be the two places I'd attack first after setting the car up on a plate.... 

And the wheels - ditch them and fit aluminium and turn down/extract the great centres from the model and fit....

I simply don't like plastic wheels - I am yet to see many which are actually "centred" on the axle.... sure, we can true them up - but the alignment of the centre of the wheel on the axle is an extreme rarity...... as you will have noted with this model - true the wheels and tyres - then watch, as you dial in some power... the centres of the wheels (bearing caps) run out of true - I have a very keen dislike fo this..... as do many fellow modelers.... it "cheapens" the work we do to set things right.... 

I am chuffed with Slot-It wheels... both the ali and also their plastic - I ought to be getting some kickback from Slot-It with my consistent remarks and comments about the quality of their componentry - I'm not... but I should.... and it is worthy of my holding in high esteem - their products are simply great.... 

 

As it has been pointed out elsewhere - as it is, it could be a lot of fun with the Scalextric tyres - if you are into drifting... ensuring that a small radius is on the outer edge would give some degree of control of how much it would lose traction in drifts... 

 

Weight - yes, yet to play around with that... I have chopped an awful lot of weight out of mine - mainly the interior... there's heaps of bulky stuff in there which amounts to a considerable reduction.... and yes, adding little bits of lead at a time to various places low down inside the chassis would most certainly improve contact with the track..... as you can appreciate - my layouts are all Scalextric "sport".... not known for any grip as such.... and not true - as would be your routed wooden track.... I believe low c of g weight would improve this model considerably... but then we look at a larger motor... and better tyres for grip.... and before we know it - we've re-invented the wheel and end up with another Slot-It model... maybe, I'll get there... but for now, I intend to run this model pretty much as I have corrected it.. 

Of course - and I know you have done this - running cyano into the axle bushes then a few drops of oil until the cyano goes off... creates the closest thing you'll get to bronze bushes in plastic.... 

If I were to change the rear end - again, it would be Slot-it... bronze bushes and the hardened steel axle etc. etc. etc... but we end up with a Slot-it running chassis with a Scalextric body on it.... I'll persevere with this for some time.. maybe, just maybe - I'll even like it.... as opposed to the L-34 - that was a very disappointing model - and it rarely comes down from the shelf to do any laps at all...... it's just not "fun" to drive... it only ever gets a run for posterity's sake... because I have it... not because I want to run it... 

 

thanks for the kind words... unlike the L-34.. a lot of this model out of the factory was quite good.... perhaps they "were" listening.... a sidewinder would have been great - and I'm almost certain one could be fitted in there - forward of the rear axle.... 

I don't believe "Scalextric" have ever been at the cutting edge of performance - perhaps in the late 50's in design and early '60's (when I entered the hobby)... but they were very quickly overtaken once the public came on board and became involved.... 

Today, they are an "also ran"... but, for as long as they can provide me (us) with models from down under - I'll continue to support them and purchase their products... 

 

frats,

Rosco

Edited by rosco01
append

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...