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terry

Ninco Mosler Chassis Help Please

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Terry

 

I agree with Phil's motor-bracing method for eliminating the dreaded 'Ninco hop'.

 

But I also brace the rear of the chassis by epoxying a couple of lengths of .055 piano wire alongside the 'channels' formed by the vertical stiffening mouldings

 

On the gear side the piano wire runs from a point level with the magnet holder, then follows the bend in the vertical moulding alongside the motor mounting bracket, then through a hole drilled to allow the brace to remain flush with the chassis before ending at a point level with the rear body mounting.

 

On the other side a much shorter length of piano wire runs from the angled vertical stiffening moulding near the end-bell, then follows the bend and terminates in a hole drilled in the curved-up section at the rear of the chassis.

 

Those small holes drilled at strategic positions lessen the likelihood of the epoxy breaking loose in a major accident.

 

Den

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Those small holes drilled at strategic positions lessen the likelihood of the epoxy breaking loose in a major accident.

 

Den

 

If you 'paint' the area to be epoxied with 'brush-on' superglue 1st, the epoxy will have something to bond to. Alternatively use J-B Weld PlasticWeld.


bram1_zpsfkhrhndv.jpg

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Hi Terry. I just use a bit of plastic from the likes of Evergreen Hobbies or similar. Even off-cuts from chassis hacking can be useful. Some proxies limit strengthening to plastic rather than metal. Very easy to work with glued in with resin.

 

Piano wire or similar sounds more problematic based on other comments. Plastic can also strengthen whole structure including bearing holder. Easy to do both sides if you want. My Aussie V8 Touring Car Proxy car is done like this. Have never had one fail. Have also beefed up guide post using same materials in like of Aussie V* and WRP rally car.

 

Regards Chas Le Breton

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Hi Terry,

Here's what I did back in the day on Ninco anglewinders to stop the dreaded hop. I used some 1/32" piano wire bent up to mate the bearing posts to the back of the motor can and bonded with JB Weld two part epoxy. I got the idea from when we raced flexy cars but then we soldered everything together. you'll need to remove some of the foil label from the motor and key up the metal on the can with some coarse emory to help the epoxy bond to it.

Cheers,

Alan

IMG-6049.jpg

 

PS. I also use this method on the early Sideways group 5's that were afflicted with the "hop".

Edited by lenny broke

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Thanks for posting Lenny, I have been trying to visualise for days.

The good news for me anyway is that is close to what I had thought.

 

Now to fix those damned Ninco's


Cheers Grant

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Thanks for posting Lenny, I have been trying to visualise for days.

The good news for me anyway is that is close to what I had thought.

 

Now to fix those damned Ninco's

No worries, looking at that pic though ,I probably should've put a bit more epoxy on top of the bearings to beef it up a bit.

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Thanks for posting that pic lenny,

 

This might be a silly question but how secure is the JB weld?

 

I have used that same method with a piano wire brace from the motor to the tops of the bearings but I soldered that in place, very secure, and it sure stopped the bounce, but when it came time to change the motor or pull it out for gear change it was horrible having to de solder and I thought then that the motor could be affected by excess heat.

 

I used the soldering method because I was concerned the JB might not hold.

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I've used it on many of my cars in the fleet Terry and can't remember having had a failure. Make sure you use enough to cover the wire brace.

It's easy enough to remove, just scrape or dremel away the fillet from the join to weaken the bond and give it a tweek. it will fracture.

Edited by lenny broke

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Yes agree should be much easier to remove if you are allowed to use metal. Suppose you could make plastic one similar that would still work but not be as hard to remove. I generally see mine as permanent so removal is not a problem. Amazing though what you can easily remove with a Dremel. Regards Chas Le Breton (charlesx)

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