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Hi Grant,

 

No I don't use any release agents at all.

 

Only time I use anything is when I've had to make a 2 part mold for a difficult wing.

 

After I've made the lower half of the mold I use some Vaseline before pouring the 2nd part, works well.

 

cheers

 

Matt

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A bit of an update on the Nissan.

 

I've molded one of the different types of wings I received from Shayne and attached it to the car.

 

Attached the chassis mounts for an MJK chassis, but here it shows the car with some wheels off a ZB Commodore fitted to get the height set correctly.

 

49881970322_51ca4c8c1f_z_d.jpg

 

I've applied a coat of primer today and will probably give it a coat of black tomorrow.

 

cheers

 

Matt

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Be interested in seeing how you did the wing mold Matt.


Cheers Grant

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Home Track..........Corvette C1 Build..........McLaren M1A Build..........Maserati 300S Build..........Allard J2 Build..........50's Diner..........Iso Griffo A3C

 

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Hi Grant,

 

The wing I received off Shayne received the same treatment as the body, a couple of coats of filler/primer and sanded smooth.

 

The Nissan wing could lay flat on its back if that makes sense so I just made the one piece mold.

 

Used the same process as the body, lego box and blu tack, and a little bit of white glue to hold the wing down during the pouring of the silicone.

 

I wasn't sure whether it was going to work but it came out good.

 

One thing I am slack on is cleaning the mold before using again.

 

49881777861_d2ce9359de_z_d.jpg

 

I've found with the one piece mold it's better to leave the resin in the mold overnight, allow it to cure and harden more before removal.

 

With other molds I've made them 2 piece like this VE wing.

 

Probably should have made a couple of key ways to keep the mold 'central' but this one works fine as is.

 

49881777766_765d6f0c46_z_d.jpg

 

Using a syringe to fill the molds is the best way to remove all air bubbles, but even then it still occurs sometimes.

 

This is the way I've done it myself, there may be easier ways and I'm always up to hear from others who have mastered making wings.

 

cheers

 

Matt

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Hi Matt,

don't know if you've tried this - probably have.....

With model railways, I made moulds up many years back using Dow Corning silicone moulding rubber Type E... magic stuff... detail is so good that castings come up with finger prints on them if you haven't wiped parts down.... I made up a "vacuum" chamber using a Pyrex lid on top of a rubber mat fitted to a wooden base plate.

Vacuum came via the intake of an air compressor.

I "painted" the first thin coating of Type E onto parts to be molded... it seemed to fix most of the "bubbles" issues... the vacuum did the rest....

Scale of my railway modeling is 1/87...... the grain on the planks of wood on a small wagon came up just as well as the injection molded original....

 

One thing which may be of use to you, is for fragile parts - I cut and fitted thin piano wire into the casting... it gave it the strength to withstand getting bumped.

My thinking is that it would lend itself well to the struts on these wings... you'd never see them inside...

 

frats,

Rosco

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Thanks for the tips Rosco.

 

I did think about using the piano wire and adding them to the molds to increase the strength of certain parts.

 

Haven't heard of the Dow Corning Silicone before but I'll definitely look into it.

 

Usually if a wing etc has a small air bubble I just use some excess resin leftover from a pour to fill the holes.

 

Saves throwing away a near perfect wing, but since I'm using most of the resin bodies/parts etc myself it's no big deal to fill if needed.

 

If I keep up with making resins I'll definitely have to look into some type of vacuum chamber.

 

cheers

 

Matt

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Hi again, Matt...

 

No - the air bubbles form in the mold.... in the Dow Corning Type E... be warned though, that stuff was frightfully expensive back then.. it most certainly won't be any cheaper now.... think it was around $30 something back in 1982..... it is a two part mix... takes about 4 days to fully cure out.

 

I "coralled" my molds using icy-pole sticks and Cyano-acrylate... mounting the fence on a small 6"x6" sheet of glass...

 

I used "Plasti-bond" for my castings... if any of them stuffed up, it was only a case of putting them back into the mold and adding more... usually with a small piece of brass wire or piano wire....

 

In one of the little wagons - I had a lot of trouble with some thin rails in one of the doors.... there wasn't any way that they would have withstood any touching in use.... and there wasn't enough meat the surrounding door frame to drill and fit brass wire.. so, I "invented" the fitting of piano or brass wire into the casting as I went....

 

I used Araldite M for my original batch of castings.. but felt it was too light - and there were shrinkage issues.. not to mention that it warped if the sun got on it for any length of time..... Plasti-bond has been a faithful media to use for my castings... and an awful lot cheaper than Araldite M...

 

Forgot to mention, I fitted an in line valve on the hose from the compressor intake... I could then apply the vacuum to the chamber and turn the tap... it held for a good 60 minutes.... the sealing of the Pyrex dish onto flat neoprene rubber was very good... my suspicion always was that the leakage which destroyed the vacuum came from the connection of the hose into the chamber... I didn't get far enough into making molds for a huge amount of different models.... I ran out of pocket money purchasing the Type E.... I think I went through about 4 kits of it... strangely, Dow Corning sell it by weight.. not volume... I believe my kits were 1 1b... I still have all the molds... happy to take pix of them if you would like to look.. and the castings once painted up... aside the original injection molded kit.... but, I'll have to destroy have the packed wardrobe to get at them....

 

frats,

Rosco

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Had a quick look at the Dow Corning Silicone Rosco, yep more expensive than the Pinkysil Silicone I'm currently using.

 

Think I'll stick to the Pinkysil as it's cheap and local (2mins away).

 

I do get pretty good detail from the Pinkysil, evident in some inserts I have made for the latest Supercars I've been producing.

 

I have also used the Oomoo Silicon which gives great detail but is more expensive, can't get local and the molds tear a lot easier than Pinkysil.

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Nissan's in the paint shop but here's the inserts I've been working on.

 

Shown here on my Mustang.

 

49885146428_8d4e6af1f1_z_d.jpg

 

This is one of the first I've made so is missing the centre hub (air bubble).

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The Dow Corning Silicon used to be the only silicon available years ago, but the high viscosity made it a lot more difficult to work with and much harder to get air bubbles out off. It need to be de gassed and then poured very slowly.

Pinkysil is a lot more user friendly,cures much quicker and gives just as much detail. Also the hardness is lower so easier to remove the casting.

But that said the Dow Corning product did serve us well for many years, and still has its use for some projects.


Phil

 

Hobart Miniature Car Club

 

Tassie Resins

 

Email

 

 

 

 

 

 

Logos%2016_17.small_zpswkcwjf0q.jpg

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Thanks Matt and Phil... I might chase some Pinkysil then.... plans ahead...

 

frats,

Rosco

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I've got some Barnes Vario 40 that I will be using to make my first mould, never done it before so will be interesting.

Has anyone used this it has a viscosity of 10k mPa s (so like honey) and a 40A shore hardness.

 

Thanks to Matt for kicking my butt into gear with this thread.

Edited by ZeGas

Cheers Grant

20191120172309-193d8f3b.gif.......................................................20170306174707-b4015afe.gif

Home Track..........Corvette C1 Build..........McLaren M1A Build..........Maserati 300S Build..........Allard J2 Build..........50's Diner..........Iso Griffo A3C

 

3D Printed Adjustable Chassis..........3D Print Projects

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Never used it Grant but looks like it would be useful for different resin projects.

 

Good that you can vary the hardness and the cure time as well.

 

Definately like to see how you go.

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Does it quote a shrinkage rate, Grant?..... the Dow stuff was incredibly accurate... but, took 4 days to cure out.. always "exciting" when you pulled the original... had a couple of failures in the early days... pulled them too soon... still "sticky"... ruined them.

 

Keen to watch how you go with this.

 

frats,

Rosco

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Says "Fast non-shrink curing at room temperature"


Cheers Grant

20191120172309-193d8f3b.gif.......................................................20170306174707-b4015afe.gif

Home Track..........Corvette C1 Build..........McLaren M1A Build..........Maserati 300S Build..........Allard J2 Build..........50's Diner..........Iso Griffo A3C

 

3D Printed Adjustable Chassis..........3D Print Projects

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That's the great thing about Pinkysil.

 

You can make your mold and within a hour pour your first cast.

 

Using Easy cast you can have your first body within 2 hours of making the mold.

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Appiled some decals to the Nissan Altima.

 

Still to do some detail work, clear coat and assemble the chassis etc.

 

49896675312_e9dff6f6d0_c_d.jpg

 

cheers

 

Matt

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G'day Shane,

No it's sitting on a metal chassis, just used some ZB wheels to set the correct ride height while I was installing the correct NSR wheels.

Here it is again with NSR wheels fitted with the unpainted inserts I'm currently working on.

49899074008_5b2fbb8f42_c_d.jpg

cheers

 

Matt

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Yeah I've got a few people that are interested in a Nissan body, for the local club and others like yourself.

Hoping to make a few to share the love.

If you're interested just send me a pm.

cheers

Matt

 

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101321768_3238064666225414_3947448302236

 

Something that I've printed out in 1/32, XD and a VK... 1/24 versions will be soon. They'll be available in Lexan but 3d printed ones will be available on request.

Edited by imugford
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