Jump to content
Stubbo

2016 Tasman Cup Car Builds

Recommended Posts

Good old Bakers solder flux will work as well as anything and easily available at Bunnings.

Just remember to clean the wire and brass with steel wool,wire brush or wet and dry, pre tin the area and it will be much easier.

As for solder, high silver content is better, but don't be too worried about finding some.

I have used regular 60:40 for many chassis.You will find that the lead free solders do not flow as well.

Edited by kalbfellp

Phil

 

Hobart Miniature Car Club

 

Tassie Resins

 

Email

 

 

 

 

 

 

Logos%2016_17.small_zpswkcwjf0q.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was having a 'bonding' issue with my chassis...

To fix it, I left the parts soaking in 'Bakers' acid for ~30mins before soldering...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bakers Fluid (old bottle) or Comweld Paste, decent quality lead solder, 80-110w electric iron.

Pre tin, heat the heaviest part first, flow solder across edge of iron end along the join. Remove the iron and let set for a few seconds. Cool in clean water.

Do the next bit.

All this is easier if you have a heat proof jog to hold everything in place.

 

I used to use silver solder as an optician. Never needed it for a wire chassis though. You use less though, and can be neater. I'd use a hot gas torch for silver though...

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bakers fluid is an acid - I a little but into the lid and use it from there. Good to clean your iron as well, but don't overdo it as that will pit and damage the tip.

I run a little with an old screwdriver along the part to start - tin (run a little solder along the edge first), then okay and run the long edge along the join until the solder runs liquid. You could also run a little more solder along the join if you think it needs it. Should only use the minimum to seal the join - too much and it won't hold properly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hate to rain on your parade GAS41T but don't the rules mention no slab sided tires? Gotta have the sidewall curvature?

 

Or was that the VRAA...I read the rules and then mix them up so I could be wrong.


John Warren

Slotcars are my preferred reality

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the rules

 

"Rear tyres may not be slab sided tyres like YellowDogs. All rear tyres must have the sidewall bulge like the rear cars did in the era. The inner sidewall does not have to have the bulge but must be radiused at the tread area."


John Warren

Slotcars are my preferred reality

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only trued the tyres yesterday

So mjk sidewall isn't passable for the rear ?

The fronts I'm going to radius as there square

& to wide

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally,

I've read through the entrants posts for this year's series. Some very nice work coming along.

Diffinity has probably nailed the solder issue... his professional career would lend itself very nicely as a sound basis for resource.

 

I won't have time now to build Cooper #2... so, Bill will return for this year.... bonus for him - maybe not so for those who have to struggle with him on the tracks. I'll clean up the tyres and put in new braids, plus some cleaning and re-lube of the axles... that's it, folk - #53 gets another jaunt around the Tasman series.

 

Maybe #2 will run next year (2017)... I'm keen to have two of these great little cars in running - #2 doesn't need an awful lot, but I'm simply not prepared to rush this second attempt. Second builds of mine are usually of better quality, well - they have been in locomotive genre's.

 

frats,

Rosco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Rosco.

I've been soldering with electric or gas for about 50 years now (started early). You'll see from my chassis that I'm not adverse to short cuts (messy welds) when I need to either...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Options are: PG, Ninco, Pendle and Tassie, Ninco Ninco and Pendle are rubber the other two eutethane!

Bugger...

Guess I'll see just how bad my MJK's go then...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Diffinity,

probably the only suggestion I can offer to effective soldering - is to ensure that the joint stays shiny or at the very least - does not look like it's powdery when cooled out.... every dodgy joint I've ever done has had a very dull "satin" like look to it - or, for electrical purposes - a distinct channel around a joint is usually the sign of a "dry joint"...

Clean surfaces, good flux, a quality solder and a hot iron with a clean tip are the essence of good joints by my experience.

I prefer a short, sharp jab with a very hot iron - than a long and protracted heating on a lower setting. If the solder "flows" - there's sufficient heat.

And - as you point out, apply more of the heated tip surface to the larger of the two parts of a join.. if attempted vice-versa, the larger piece will draw too much heat from the joint once the iron tip is removed.

 

For miniscule parts, I use heat sinks... of varying types.... even the humble spring loaded aluminium hair clip can be a most effective heat sink to prevent soldered joints either up or down stream from melting.

 

White metal is probably the hardest material I have yet to solder. It needs to be tinned and the absolute minimum heat required applied the joint.

Bismuth is the ideal solder - it has the lowest melting point.

I use a dedicated temperature controlled iron for white metal work.

When joining white metal to brass - I tin the brass first ...... there is clear and perilous danger when trying to solder brass to white metal without tinning... the brass attracts/retains much of heat from the tip.... and once white metal begins to "flicker" - it's but a second more to result in a lovely casted white metal part becoming a 'blob". You certainly don't want any residual heat in the brass transferring into an already over-heated white metal part.

 

Fortunately, in my limited experience with slot cars - there isn't a lot of white metal employed... I love working with brass. I had grave reservations with working in piano wire - but some of the senior members here were very kind to suggest a most reliable method which has not failed me...

 

Clean joints, good flux and sufficient heat...

 

What is probably wrongfully labelled as "silver solder" in one of the major hardware stores, is my much preferred solder. There might be "some" silver in it.. but I would probably be more inclined to call it "bearing solder".

In either case, it flows well and retains a very robust joint. It is readily filed or ground with a fine rotary bit in a Dremel like machine.

 

It takes 1K etch (the green stuff I use....called Protec 1K etch) very well - and is an extremely sound base for primers and top coats.

 

Ok, 'nuff from me for a while now - time for all the other entrants to have their turn..

 

frats,

Rosco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did some more work on my T53 today and I managed to tick a few more bits off my list...

 

Made rear suspension arms, top and bottom.

Repaired the exhaust.

Prepped the inserts for painting.

Added some lead to the chassis.

Fixed the lead wires to help with guide centring.

Glued the driver and seat back in.

Refitted the rear vision mirror.

Created body mounts on the chassis.

 

But, I still have to...

Make front suspension arms.

Possibly make rear 'swaybar'.

Make shocks front and rear.

Fix guide over rotation.

Glue and True the tyres.

Change the number.

Plus anything else I missed...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...