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rosco01

My First Builds

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Well, no pix - and even this might struggle to make the forum.... the Telstra Troll is at it again.

 

Sat down at the workbench after dinner last night and started cleaning up those wishbones before attacking the springs/dampers.... decided to do a bit more "housework" on the ugly solder joints and overflows.... just a couple of lemonades later and I started yawning

Turned off the computer somewhere around 21:00 because the Troll had finally realised I was using it's data... so, didn't have any idea of the time.

When I turned off the light - the clock in the kitchen showed 02:03..... another 6 hours added to the labour costs in this build... and no further progress other than a whisk around with the broom....

 

Start on the springs today - my fears are now that the larger spring may not clear the rear axle...

I have decided to cut the torsion bar into three pieces and add a flat plate link to the top (from some left over Slot-It suspension sprues).

 

So, hopefully - we'll get some springs/dampers on today...

 

I'm now contemplating the livery of the Bill Patterson #9 car raced at Longford (Tas) in the Tasman Cup in 1964.... white with a silver centre stripe and nose...

 

I only have one pic of it.

 

The remaining two models will be of Brabham's green Cooper and the white Alan Burgess car.... I simply didn't like the yellow overalls he wore - and that has swayed me to the Bill Patterson car... not final yet... much consideration to be given to this..

 

For the series, #9 has been taken - so, I'll have to come up with a substitute number.

 

frats,

Rosco

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Ok folk,

another huge day on the bench - and again, lots of smiles here at present.

Now half way with the rear suspension - left hand side is completed almost... minus brake hoses and some nick-nacks....

 

I started out expecting grand-kids to arrive at any time.. so just mulled about on it for an hour or two trying this and that with what I had dreamed up for the torsion bar, links and method to connect them up to the spring/damper .... I wasn't happy with the simple return loop after all and decided to make a start on some link arches.

I ratted though my box of spare Slot-It sprues and nothing really came close... so, I grabbed a strip of brass and marked out the length and span needed.

In the pix I have of this little car - the arm seems to run above the main axle... I may have it wrong - but that's the best I could come up with - so, if it's wrong...I'm just going to have to wear the consequences... however - it all works... didn't know this until about 21:30 when I finally got the spring and rear damper to snap between the wishbones - and clear the axle.... whoopee!

 

I had to make up some bushes from two different sized tubes - soldered them together and filed out the rear bracket until I got the height for the body to rest on them - this now has the chassis rails in line with the bottom of the body - which is where I believe it belongs.

 

Next, I needed to make a torsion bar - I wanted to run this right across as a single unit - but it would have fouled the crown wheel.. small as it its.

 

I made some aluminium tubing bearings and decided to use some stainless 1.6mm TIG wire for the bars.

 

Whilst cutting them - I learned a great new little trick if anyone wants to try it.

I placed the rod on a block of wood and hand held the dremel with a thin cutting wheel.... rolling the rod around I found that I could leave a small portion at the end - which, when fitted - looks like a retaining bolt.... will definitely use that again...

 

Having the links drilled and filed to shape, the bushes soldered onto the rear bracket and the torsion bars in them - gave me the first opportunity to measure up the drop-link.... I made this out of 0.8mm brass rod - to differentiate it from the chunky torsion bar and the thick arch link.

 

Now came the tricky bit - that blasted spring... and the damper arrangement.

 

I used the damper made up previously and found that it could not be fitted as a unit through the wishbones...

I tried to assemble it within the space in two parts, but that was almost impossible too. We haven't even got to spring yet...and I'm beginning to feel a bit weary...

 

I managed to cut some more from the base of the damper so that there was just enough to mount on a 1mm brass rod... then cut some more away from the top section of the damper pushrod... eventually, it all went in ... now the spring.

 

I measured the extended length of the damper and the gap between the two spring retainers I had soldered onto both pieces... it came back at just over 5mm.

 

I cut the larger of the springs above... my next model will have smaller diameter dampers and I will use the small spring.

 

Once I had the spring to shape - it all fitted nicely out of the model... but took ages to pry and squeeze it together withing the wishbones.. but it went in.

 

I ran a 1 mm brass rod over the top of the lower wishbones and this became the base for the filed slot in the damper to sit on.

The upper retainer sat very nicely under the front upper wishbone - with the spring very slightly compressed.

 

I was very concerned the spring would foul the axle - but in its forward-most location - it clears the axle by about 1mm... so, up until then - had no idea if the idea was going to work....

 

I fluxed everything up and pressed down on the spring whilst soldering - otherwise, the front wishbone would have pushed out by the spring.

 

The last bit was easy peasy.... compared to all the above - I just needed to make up an 0.8mm connecting link from the arch to the damper mount rod - soldered that in and started filing and sanding away the mess.

 

So, guess that was another 13 hour day on the bench...with few little minor distractions.

 

Guess you've read enough... five pix... one with a spare body nestled down nicely in position..

 

Tomorrow - hopefully, I'll have the second rear suspension done.... be a bit quicker now that I know what has to be done......I won't post tomorrow night... no point... you'll see it all completed when I get to the next stage....

 

Cpr%20rear%20susp%20005%20mail_zpsvfzcqpt8.jpg

 

Cpr%20rear%20susp%20007%20mail_zpsedixliqg.jpg

 

Cpr%20rear%20susp%20006%20mail_zpst51tsikl.jpg

 

Cpr%20rear%20susp%20008%20mail_zpsgx2dt9nf.jpg

 

Cpr%20rear%20susp%20009%20mail_zpsoicsc8br.jpg

 

frats,

Rosco

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nice work Rosco,

 

your attention to detail is a reminder that I could do better on my builds!

 

 

Terry

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Thanks Terry,

although I put a fair bit of work into it - it does not come close to that of those who are serious about scale modelling and far better skilled than I at building.

 

I am very envious of Old23's (Stewart, F one thirty two forum) version of this car. He has gone to such accuracy in detail that I believe I should probably have committed a bit more time to planning it out.

 

His springs are narrower - and this affords a more realistic length... I was stuck with the ones I had.... and made the best of what I could do.

It would appear that the springs he used are closer to that of the smaller ones from the Bic lighter in the post up above.

 

I also noted (post my work) that his upper wishbones are angled upwards - which means they are mounted lower - that in itself gives a lot more headroom to work with when fitting the dampers/springs...

 

Chassis #2 will get the revision - but, for the upcoming Tasman proxy - I'm hoping my little car will truddle around the track without issue..

Not built for pace nor for concours - I'll get a lot of pleasure just having it run the series - if it behaves and my work doesn't disgrace itself...

 

Oh, by the way - that mis-placed wishbone and steering link got the better of me - I "had" to re-locate them.... happy now.

 

frats,

Rosco

Edited by rosco01

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Good (I mean great) job Ross. I doubt I could summons up the patience let alone the talent to do what you have done.

Edited by Wobble

bram1_zpsfkhrhndv.jpg

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Thanks Bram - pix probably make it look better than it really is... paint will pull a lot of the bling away from it as well.

 

Rest day today - just went and bought some more brass tubing.

 

My Light Putty arrived - along with the 4.40 and M2 taps and dies... lots planned for the next few days.

 

frats,

Rosco

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Chassis is now finished except for brake lines and painting..... plus, of course - re-assembly.

 

Start on body tomorrow.

 

frats,

Rosco

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If you're interested in other springs you could try BNA Model World. They have a bit of a list. Absolutely fabulous service.


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

_AM_sig_zps00cdfd1a.jpg

 

Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

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Thanks Ember - I'll try the narrower springs on chassis #2 first... if I'm not happy - I'll click open the link I've just saved that you posted - much appreciated.

Meant to ask (and shouldn't need to) - which ones from the Bic did you use?... from memory, it was also the larger ones.

 

The ones Stewart used are much more accurate for the T-53 (as you would expect - those Cooper T-53 models he produced are exquisite).

 

frats,

Rosco

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Yup, I used small section of the long spring on my very simplified, broad brush stroke approximation of rear suspension.

suspension2_zpsc72f295c.jpg


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

_AM_sig_zps00cdfd1a.jpg

 

Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

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Works for me, Ember.... your springs look an awful lot better than my lumpy off-road version ..

 

I hadn't seen this before - but your bracket has the cut-outs for the rails to pass through.

The ones I recently picked up, which were made by a member of this forum - did not ... and I had to file them out.

Similarly, the front brackets from the same supplier were at the same width as the outside of the rear bracket.

This resulted in me having to mount my rails below the front bracket.

 

I now fully intend to make my own brackets for next chassis (#3) for the third T-53.

 

Having a little bit better understanding of how things go together, I will extend the front bracket so that the guide can be mounted as far forward as the nose will allow.

I intend to fold the front bracket to the same width as the inside of the rails - thus allowing the bracket to sit within the rails and flush with the building tile.

 

I will keep the same dimensions for the rear bracket - but of course will create the shelf for the rails to sit on.

 

I may have some further options by the time I come to start on #3... I can pre-drill the wishbone holes in both brackets prior to folding.

 

You can be assured, if nothing else - that the mounting face for the motor will be flat, as well as square and perpendicular to the chassis rails... a lesson well learned from my first attempt at assembling the brackets to the rails.

 

I will need to order further crowns and pinons from RD... I envisage a number of these great little F1/GP cars in my garage... can't wait to do a BT-24 - that one in particular appeals to me above all but the T-53's at present..

 

How are you going with body #2?... as Phil states, we've got 8 weeks - but they will simply melt before our eyes... can't tell you where the past 8 have gone since I started these little builds..... we're at the half-way point for me... hope I get the body finished... let alone find somewhere to give it a good run on a decent track...

 

 

frats,

Rosco

Edited by rosco01

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Ok folk,

I've just kicked into my new month's data allowance - so can pick up this thread with pix a bit more often now.

 

Work has progressed somewhat - I now have the brake-lines to both the front and rear suspension fitted along with two frames to centre the rear of the body.

The body front will be centered with the one and only mounting screw - body fitted as a floating companion to the chassis.

 

I made the first rear frame by extending the brake lines across the crown and returning to form them again on the other side - this worked reasonably well - but there was still too much lateral slide for my liking.. and I wasn't going to make another assembly.

I simply made up a shortened version and soldered that down the front sides of the rear bracket.

 

The body now sits nicely on the rear suspension, but can float around up and down and to a very small degree side to side - but it's more of a feel than a see....

 

These brake lines and frames are made of 0.45 mm brass rod - I was going to use 0.20 mm - but they were far too flimsy.

 

I have sprayed the chassis with Protec 1K etch - a translucent green etching paint used in the automotive world.

 

I thinned it to 1:1 using (automotive) acrylic thinners... it sprayed beautifully through the airbrush at 15 p.s.i. - with no spider webbing as is experienced with SEM etch primer if either the viscosity or air pressure do not match the occasion.....

 

I have solderer with this paint applied - and, although it does tarnish a bit - it certainly doesn't lift, blister or peel.. and seems pretty hardy when working in proximity with files and pliers etc.....

 

I am about to start work on fabricating up an exhaust system from brass rod... this is going to take some time...

 

Ok progress pix - five of them...

 

Cpr%20frt%20susp%20006%20mail_zpsyazvoeic.jpg

 

Cpr%20rear%20susp%20011%20mail_zpsjk35svha.jpg

 

 

 

Cpr%20chassis%20mail%20001_zpsbez8lki1.jpg

 

Cpr%20chassis%20mail%20002_zpszv4j5bhp.jpg

 

Cpr%20chassis%20mail%20003_zps8zsldddq.jpg

 

frats,

Rosco

Edited by rosco01

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Big day on the bench today - I have now built my first exhaust.

At times, I didn't believe I'd manage my plan... and had to sit back and think a bit more about building it.

 

First attempt to simply bend brass wire and somehow couple it to one point wasn't a success.

 

I decided to get back to basics and make up a brass strip "manifold" - so to speak.... and measured out the location of each pipe as it would have exited the head.

 

I drilled these out with a 0.5mm drill then went up to a 0.8mm.

I left the "manifold" as part of a 200 mm strip and worked at making each pipe, commencing with the two longer and most outward pipes - being the two centre ones.

All my references came from pix.. not much joy in getting any great detail, but the end result is how I am best informed by these pix on how the exhaust system is fitted to these little cars - call it an educated guess - but I firmly believe it simply "works".

 

After I had the two inner pipes soldered in - I started bending them to shape using to small pairs of rounded pliers... they came together in a "siamese" fashion - as was the trend for the day.

 

A few goes were made during the day to get the manifold up against the rear bracket - and then juggle the body to find out where the manifold would ultimately need fixing to the chassis.... this took a large chunk out of the day and I took a number of breaks to get some free headspace before re-visiting the issue.

 

Eventually, the bends and twists became such that they would pass through the body port.. and the manifold looked as if it would solder to the rear bracket.

 

I then set about the two end pipes - and found that I had to pull them in very closely to the chassis rails - or the body simply wouldn't clear them.

The rear one needed running in a reverse bend forward - the front one needed a bit of a return twist outwards and back in behind the two main pipes.

 

All pipes were made from 0.8 mm brass rod.

 

When I had them all sitting pretty - I soldered them in earnest to the manifold - then formed a collection point where they all met up.

I left the centre rear pipe long - for it was to that I fitted a length of 1.57 mm brass tube (K&S #1143).

 

I then cut off the manifold from the brass strip and ground/filed/sanded away all but what was necessary to hold the pipes together and leave a tang at the rear to mount on the rear bracket... all good so far...

 

I left the brass tubing long - as it then formed the larger tail-pipe section and I worked hard at trying to make it resemble the megaphone as on the proto-type... a little bit of error is hoped to be overseen here... as the proto-type certainly expands quite a bit towards the rear.

 

I found that I could fiddle around with the assembly by holding this pipe between my finger and thumb... and, of course - some thick wadding when soldering.

 

Now I had to mount it...

 

It took quite some fiddling and the resultant burned fingers trying to tack it in place... without over-heating the surrounding chassis - for fear of the whole lot simply falling apart... a bucket of cold water was always at arm's length to immediately dunk the chassis in as each piece was soldered on and the joint "floated to shiny, wet solder".

 

I had the exhaust mounted and was very happy with the result - until I again tried to fit the body - the outer pipes were fouling the body - so, I opened up the inside of the port to gain relief - luckily without enlarging the outer hole... phew!

 

Then it dawned on me.... motor!... I reached for the parts tub and tried to fit it within the manifold... nope.. so, off it came again and I had to re-shape the mount point of the manifold.

 

I then soldered it all back on and fitted the body - I was happy....

 

I also filed a curved nick in the lower rear wishbone - and then soldered the tail-pipe into that slot.... the result is that it is very rigid and almost bullet proof for damage.

 

I referenced the pix again and marked where the end of the tail-pipe reached on the proto-type... and cut the excess off with a dremel disc..

 

So, yes - another huge day... and a new set of tricks to use in future... I'm pretty happy with my first exhaust...

There might be a "miss" in #4 cylinder every now and then when the motor is pushing hard... that strange bend I put in there will undoubtedly cause some back-pressure....

 

I am going to send a pic of this exhaust to my flying colleagues when I have the motor re-fitted... and ask them how to connect up the exhaust to an electric motor...

I know the response I'm likely to get.. and won't post here.. think you'll know what I'm likely to get.... beside the "senility" and "aged" comments which I also know to be coming...

 

Pix... all pretty self explanatory - now that you've read the book....

 

Cpr%20exhaust%20001%20mail_zps9iloaoti.jpg

 

Cpr%20exhaust%20003%20mail_zpsd1ul79pm.jpg

 

Cpr%20exhaust%20002%20mail_zps1hltlnju.jpg

 

Cpr%20exhaust%20005%20mail_zpsrjtpefnx.jpg

 

Cpr%20exhaust%20007%20mail_zps4yzfevhz.jpg

 

Cpr%20exhaust%20008%20mail_zps7jozyvc9.jpg

 

Cpr%20exhaust%20006%20mail_zpskit4e2ys.jpg

 

Cpr%20exhaust%20004%20mail_zpsw2kuxflv.jpg

 

Cpr%20exhaust%20009%20mail_zps70xxttbc.jpg

 

frats,

Rosco

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Ok, panicked a bit overnight - and just checked with great relief.

Exhaust - track clearance.... there is a minimum clearance specified for the series on registration (except for crown).

 

See pix - phew!.

 

I am about to true down the rear tyres shown here.. to just beyond minimum... will still have required track clearance.

 

Cooper%201%20chassis%20fit%20013%20mail_zpsrla73o3l.jpg

 

Cooper%201%20chassis%20fit%20012%20mail_zpskwptkzaj.jpg

 

Cooper%201%20chassis%20fit%20014%20mail_zpsdh2hki6y.jpg

 

frats.

Rosco

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Looking good Ross. A thought just crossed my mind and that is, what about a small artist type paint brush ferule for the megaphone exhaust?


bram1_zpsfkhrhndv.jpg

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Thanks Bram,

I ordered in about 300 boot-lace ferrules - from the smallest and up two sizes...

 

The pix I have seen of this little car have an increasingly growing tail-pipe - I might be able to use "light putty" to simulate this... not sure yet..

I don't particularly want to go back in with solder.. and, as you well know - aluminium "won't"....

 

I still haven't started on the body - have trued down the rear tyres to 21.00 mm... that's close enough for me - running in might take another few 10th's off them - especially if I get to run on some ferrodore (which is the most likely at present).

 

This little car will hit the grid line up for the series with next to no running... save for what I can get on the very rare occasion when I visit my slot group (so far, only twice in three months... been a bit busy, think you can appreciate).

 

I'm still not happy with the front axle - it is missing springs - and I am struggling to find a way of at least adding a couple of coils and a rod.. I'll have another think overnight and see what I can come up with tomorrow.

 

About to crack open my tube of Light Putty... have been hanging do get a shot at this stuff..... the room is not quite a darkroom.. and I need plenty of light to see (old age)... so, it's highly likely that I'm going to get frustrated with the stuff... report later.

 

I had issue with one of the rear wheels - it is drilled slightly off centre.. - lined up on the trueing axle ok - but took ages to set it on the running axle... it's now set as good as I can get it and I have used Loctite 262 to hold it there.. in the hub/axle contact - I didn't use it on the grub - I have used that stuff before in threads and it's dynamite deadly stuck... almost to the point of having to drill and re-tap... cyano will work for threads.. at least you can hit it with acetone to break the bond.

 

Had another close look at the centering spring arrangement for the guide - nearly set to work on it - but with this model (and #2) it isn't going to happen.... the guide mount needs to be much further out front (as it will be in #3 and #4).

 

So, where have I hidden that Light Putty?.....piles and piles of stuff on the bench and shelves above it..... gotta be somewhere.....

 

frats,

Rosco

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Time to fess up - the missing front springs got the better of me.

 

Surprisingly, I had these made up and fitted in less than two hours..

I used the thinner BIC lighter spring and 1/16" brass tube plus the brass rod for the fixed portion.

 

I was able to fit the assembly in from the rear and simply solder the right angle leg at the base across the lower wishbones.

The upper rod simply rested onto the top of the front bracket and soldered in partnership with the brake line.

 

I cut the spring to 10 mm length and found that this afforded a very light pressure to keep it in tension.

 

Downside is that the spring/damper assembly are not mounted central as the proto-type is... this being impossible because I have elected to use an axle tube for my front assembly. If I were to attempt building a replica scale model version - I would opt for independent stub axles - the spring/dampers could then pass centrally where they belong.

 

I'm pretty happy with the effort - certainly now shows up my "off road" huge first spring effort at the rear... I'm not considering a retro-fit.. and it might just again get the better of me... have to look at how complicated removal and replacement will be...

 

So, maybe tomorrow - I'll get to start on the body...

 

pix..

 

Cooper%201%20chassis%2013%20mail_zpsgxfq4acg.jpg

 

Cooper%201%20chassis%2014%20mail_zpsblqqicno.jpg

 

Cooper%201%20chassis%2015%20mail_zpsyjuqfhnp.jpg

 

frats,

Rosco

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I'm not sure about automotive tyre valve springs, David... might be worth a look - the tyre repair fella's just rip 'em out and chuck 'em in the rubbish.. can't be too hard to find a user friendly one...even if you use the projected purchase of a full set of tractor tyres as a smokescreen (not a nice bloke, am I?).

 

I'm very happy with these BIC ones - unless there's something you can see which I am tunnel-visioned with by working too darned close to this project for a couple of months.

 

The BIC ones cost about $2 each.. and, as Ember states - there's enough of that large spring to probable do an entire front and rear suspension.... won't get that from your LHS....

 

frats,

Rosco

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Tossed and turned on this overnight - think it's going to get the better of me... those rear springs - they have to go...

 

frats,

Rosco

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Yes, another "biggie"... took me until lunchtime to get the old rear springs/dampers out.... they were never going to fall out in running, trust me.

 

Pic of rear assembly after removal.

 

rear%20spring%20assy%20removed%20mail_zpskekspcsd.jpg

 

Ok - got a bit to cover tonight, I'll try and type a bit and add the pix to break up the monotony a bit.

 

Next pic shows the removed lumpy old spring assembly - for an off-road model, the larger BIC springs might be good... but for these little half-tonners - they are pretty much like a car spring on a bicycle...

 

As you can see, when I made the old ones up - and these new ones, I used 6 different components for each.

 

The brass rod runs right though - and both ends are soldered onto the chassis.

 

The damper is simply a 4.5mm long length of 1/16" brass tubing.

 

The next bits get a bit tricky - there are two short washers cut from brass tube for the spring retainers.

 

At the pushrod end, there is also a further washer cut from the 1/16" tube as an insert for the larger one.

 

I made my springs 7mm long - which is nearly the span between the upper and lower wishbones.. less a bit each end for the pushrod to form the mounts.

 

I found it easier this time to fit and solder the pushrod end spring retainers.. then fit the damper, spring then solder the damper end retainer onto the damper.

 

pix...

 

rear%20spring%20assy%20001%20mail_zpsfmkq26kj.jpg

 

rear%20spring%20assy%20003%20mail_zpspfjl7d9z.jpg

 

rear%20spring%20assy%20002%20mail_zpsnvr293yo.jpg

 

During re-fitting of the right hand side spring, the heat of the soldering iron melted the previous day's work with the exhaust.... and the frame to centre the body... so, it was a pretty torrent time until I had all three back in their correct places...

The left hand side went in very easily - compared to the first time I attempted fitting springs - this one only took about 5 minutes... tacking the upper pushrod end on first, then tweaking position of the lower and before flooding both ends with solder.

 

rear%20spring%20assy%20004%20mail_zpsi9cyuzpy.jpg

 

About half an hour ago - I finished of scraping and filing down the excess.... everything is back where it was this time last night... but, I'm a lot more comfortable with the lighter springs...

 

rear%20spring%20assy%20005%20mail_zpsoqkv5a6c.jpg

 

rear%20spring%20assy%20006%20mail_zpsvvtfrkwg.jpg

 

rear%20spring%20assy%20007%20mail_zpsie5otpuj.jpg

 

So, tomorrow - maybe, just maybe - I'll finally get to start on the body.....

 

frats,

Rosco

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Looking great there Rosco...

Not that the original rear springs were bad, but these are just better...

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Thanks fella's,

sometimes you can get "too close" to a model... should have given it a bit of air for a day or two.

Just realised after coming back from the flying field - one upper spring retainer is mounted higher than the other - it will annoy me (as it does now) - but I'm leaving it... or I'll never get onto the body....

With the body mounted - it doesn't stand out (as much) - but I know it's there... and should have paid more attention... guess the de-soldering of the exhaust and mounting frame took a little more out of my concentration that I realised.

 

About to hit the spray booth (garage) and give it a final misting of Protec etch.

 

Oops, forgot to mention - all up nett weight as it stands - 14.09 g - bare = no axles, guide etc., etc.,....

 

frats,

Rosco

Edited by rosco01

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Ok - didn't start work again on the model until this afternoon... went flying this morning..

 

I sprayed Protec on the completed chassis yesterday - and today sprayed Tamiya grey primer over it.

 

It is my intention that this the colour I'll use (as most of the Cooper cars I have pix of show this) and I'll simply hit it with clear gloss then do the detailing colours after that.

 

I have finally started on the body ... in fact - I'm an awful lot further than I expected to be in just two short days.

 

Yesterday, up until about midnight - I created the tail section support rail and roll bar.

 

Although both models I was supplied with have great detail of the support rail under the top of the tail section - I wanted to file that out and create my own one using brass.

 

This also will assist in putting the tail section back on the model and give some strength to the open "jaws" of the front section with the tail missing.

 

I drilled two 0.8 mm holes vertically down through each side of the body where the frame exits from and then shaped out a brass frame from 0.8mm wire.

I pressed that in so that it followed the exact height and line of the molded one in the tail section - then scraped/sanded the molded one out.

 

I then filed a channel for the new brass frame to sit in and eventually got the tail section to rest over it...

 

I made up a roll bar from 1.0 mm brass rod - filed two nicks in it where I wanted it to sit on the brass frame - then soldered that into position and filed out the excess solder.

 

I measured where the top of the motor would reach and cut the end of the roll bar arms off to suit....

 

So, I had now finally got to the body and was pretty happy by the time I called it quits at midnight last night..

 

As you probably recall - I cut the tail section of both the first two models - with the view of fitting intake rams underneath the air intake cover.

 

The more I looked at pix - the more disheartened I became for cutting the bodies up... there are a few proto-types where the cover has been cut back and the intakes are clearly visible... this is what I am going to effect with these two bodies... and the one I'm working on now will be the proxy model.

 

I made up an intake manifold out of 0.020" styrene card (because I was told the ferules are aluminium) then marked out and drilled the holes for them.

I have space them 2.5mm apart and this fits in nicely with the 12mm length of intake I can fit in behind the cover.

I fitted the ferules into the manifold and pressed them in so that, when it was fitted to the model - they just reach the opening above the body.

 

I used c/a to fix the ferules into the styrene - then spread baking soda on the rear where the c/a had puddled.

 

I then set about filing off the excess AND found that they are not aluminium, but copper.. I could have used brass strip for the manifold and soldered... this would have been my preferred method

 

I then set about grinding/cojoling/sanding/filing away the body so that this manifold would sit against the inside... square to the body and parallel to the longitudinal line of the model.It also needed clearance from the side of the motor - that motor is simply the nucleus in this little model - I still don't know how I'm going to get the driver "over" it.... this is puzzling/worrying me a bit...

 

Next came the tricky bit.... getting the tail section to fit down over the previously made brass wire support for the tail and roll bar - plus sit on the chassis AND allow the intake manifold to somehow hold re-fix the tail section to the body....

This section also had to run in the same lines as it was when cut off.

 

With the chassis now completed and dry enough to be gentle with - I eventually found that my work was beginning to pay off... but, as Ember has posted so many times... holding half a dozen different bits together with just two hands and whatever else you find laying on your bench to keep things steady....well, guess you can sort of appreciate how a good half hour simply melted away....

 

It took quite a bit of juggling - and and resulted in a little more removal of body internal ... but, tonight - it's all sitting nicely together unglued - but ready for assembly once I paint the parts I won't be able to reach when assembled...

 

No pix - golf tomorrow - but I'll try and fire a few pix off and post up tomorrow night.

 

Oh, before I forget.... I weighed everything on my little digital micro scales.... except for driver (what will be left of him) and windscreen plus paint....

My all up weight of everything on the scales is 55.57 g.... the all up weight of the body unpainted is 8.61g... just in case anyone is interested.

 

Big story, no pix... sorry, folk....

 

frats,

Rosco

Edited by rosco01

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