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rosco01

Slot-It Gt40 Mk 1 White Kit

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Hi all,

some have been watching my progressive posts on a number of Slot-It GT40's I have been messing around with.

I bought a white kit version some time back - and over the past few weeks have just about completed it... pretty happy with a first model build for many, many years....

 

I had absolutely no idea what livery I would model - and Ember suggested a few options...

 

I was polishing/waxing one of my full scale cars one day - and saw a GT40 on the bottles I use (Mother's)... it was a greenish gold colour... and it took my attention.

Second thoughts were for a Jack Brabham "old nail" combination... but this one won out... people using the polishing system can probably relate more to it than that of the Turquoise Gold of Sir Jack's...

 

I couldn't find the paint I wanted - so mixed my own... all previous experience in model airbrushing was either in model railways or r/c aeroplanes... neither of them really fitted in with my needs... the Floquil paint is great - but I don't believe it would stand up to the rigors of slots....

 

I ended up mixing my own Vallejo paint from bronze and white.. at a ratio of 4B : 1W... it came very close to that of the Mother's bottle.. but - and there's always a "but"... it peeled when i removed the masks.... so, back to plastic, metho based etch and finding something else.

 

I took heed of Ember suggesting a number of others - and sought out a local hobby shop who stocked a better range than my LHS....

 

I found Tamiya Titanium Gold to be a very close match for what I'd mixed.... and realised that should I need to do any touch ups... it would not require any mixing.

 

I decided to add "stripes" to my model... in lieu of the plain version on the Mother's bottle.... save for the sill stripes and Ford GT lettering... which I had no intention of attempting by use of masks....

 

I further decided that this would not be a road car... because it had a racing driver..... one would seriously have to take a second glance at anyone driving on the road in full racing get-up... so - it was going to be a track car....

 

With that, I needed a number... and "invented" my own... so, now we're into a "fantasy" livery completely...

 

The number 22 seemed a good choice - not too difficult to create (read on) and without any holes or dots.... so - 22 it was... two little ducks....

 

One night, in a deep sleep - I had a vision (in total darkness, of course) - and awoke in a shudder with the reality I could create my own numerals ... using body colour masking.

 

The white pad part was easy.... simply spray white on the body where I wanted stripes and the two pads... I didn't want numbers on the front or rear of the model... just the doors... I feel, unless they are very accurate - the demean the appearance of a model which is attempting to scream out at onlookers of its metallic and glossy finish...

 

My "vision" consisted of masking off the white pads.. but by "un-masking" where the numerals were to be placed....

To do this, I used a Dymo machine and printed out the pair of numbers in the font and size needed.

 

I cleaned and spread masking tape down onto a glass sheet I use for masking very sharp lines (thanks, model railway efforts) and then stuck the Dymo numerals onto the mask.

I used a 14mm washer as the outline for the number pads - then cut them out... through the mask underneath.

 

It was then simply a case of transferring the entire mask onto the white of the door panels.

 

The two thin stripes each side of the broader line along the sills were very time consuming... and the distance from them to the main stripe was about 0.5mm.... something I had not done for many, many years.

 

I sprayed the gold... then left it....

 

Days later, when I believed the paint had cured - I began to remove the masks.... holding the body very loosely using tissue paper....

 

I was amazed that most/all of the detail of my masks held up...

 

When I brought the model inside - I noted with horror - that the tissue had imprinted into the colour finish... leaving a woven finish...

I did spot repairs - again using the 14mm washer and masking off the entire front door section on both sides...flattened out the "weave" and then keyed it up.... sprayed more gold on and left it again....

 

When it came to removing the masks again... all was sound - save that I removed some of the numerals at top of the passenger side.. but I'd lost the passion to re-visit the Dymo process... and just left them as you see in the pix....

 

For clear coats, my LHS only stocked spray cans of TS-13.... Ember put me onto X22 and I truddled off again to a neighboring h/s to pick up my needs...

 

I tested a scrap piece of gold painted plastic - and the Tamiya thinner all but brought the particles into a floating circus.... so, no Tamaya thinner...

Ember again came to my rescue and suggested that some members use Windex.... I was prepared to try anything to avoid another strip.. and certainly would not have left the model unprotected without clear coats...

 

I tried the Windex method... one drop per 4 drops of clear... and it worked a treat (thanks again, Ember).

 

I spent two nights fitting windows and lights etc.... getting them into as flat a fit as I could.

 

I had really chopped, filed and sanded away at the cowl in the engine bay on this model... to get the suspension clearance I needed.

It all went back together famously - except that I had to reverse twist a round needle file through some of the holes...

 

The entire model is glued with Canopy Glue 560 (thanks members).

 

In the pix below - you can see that my attempts to re-colour the wheels is effective.. but will be short lived.... I am fitting the larger spoked GT40 wheels with larger knock-offs... again, in the same colour as these are shown... but I will remember to remove the gold from the rear hubs.....

 

All in all - I'm pretty happy with a return in this, my first model for 20 or more years.... the little Badger 200 air-brush has been absolutely brilliant for all the 30 plus years I've had it.... the operator.. well, he's a bit like the bloke who will spend the remainder of his life trying to go the wrong way through a revolving door... I just keep making the same mistakes... until I remember them....

 

Hope you enjoy the pix.

 

GT4022200_zps6aad57e6.jpg

 

GT4022201_zps32ba6813.jpg

 

GT4022202_zps6fb4e516.jpg

 

GT4022203_zps9bbb2e3c.jpg

 

 

Lots of changes to be made to the chassis and running gear... for 1 - the motor to be changed to the 29k500 plus the engine pod mount which will allow me to fit the pinion on the case side... Ergal 10 tooth pinion, Ergal 36 tooth spur... that's about it - along with MJK urethane rears..

 

frats,

Rosco

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Came up well. The colour choice is pure class.


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

_AM_sig_zps00cdfd1a.jpg

 

Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

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Thats awesome - great colours and well done on the modelling


"Don't trust everything you read online" - W. Shakespeare

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Yeah, that is a nice job. It will be interesting to see how resilient the canopy glue.


John Warren

Slotcars are my preferred reality

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I've used canopy glue on most of my proxy rally cars for the last few years, Munter. Not had one return to kit form yet.


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

_AM_sig_zps00cdfd1a.jpg

 

Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

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Great job there rosco01. Just got to say the best part is you picked my favourite number. How's that?


bram1_zpsfkhrhndv.jpg

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Thanks folk - yes, very happy with my first one in such a long time - and very appreciative of your help, Ember..... wouldn't have looked anywhere as good (not great, just good) without your assistance and suggestions.

 

Wobble - the "22" was a no-brainer... didn't want single digit ... didn't like the 33 because of the Brut version.. 11 to me is just lazy.... 77 is very popular and the others all needed dots or holes.... could have gone with a numeric mix... but 22 seemed right - it sort of fits in with the #24 of the Hill/Stewart car....

 

 

@ Espix,

yes, I did... quite a bit sceptical at first... but it worked.

Smelled a bit "funny" when I mixed it up - and it goes a bit cloudy in the mix when you shake the living daylights out of it to mix it.

I'd suggest only mixing up a little bit - and I strained my mix through very fine stainless mesh (usually do, anyway) screen.

Got some white "gluey" stuff out of the mix.. but it might have been aerated "something".... don't think it came from the Windex - or the X22... just something which developed when the two were added and mixed... when it finished settling - there wasn't anything in it... but it might have caused issue if I had left it in the mix and tried to spray it..... don't know.

 

What I did find - is that I had to leave quite a bit of time between coats..... normally I found that Tamiya goes off pretty quickly.. re-coats can be applied within a few minutes (test piece used)... but, with Windex in the mix - I'd probably suggest either cleaning up the gun and leaving it for up to an hour - then re-apply.... or, spray a mist coat, leave it for 10 minutes then a wet coat..... and repeat on a daily basis until the depth of gloss is attained......

 

This is my take on the Windex X22 mix....

 

frats,

Rosco

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I've not yet been game to reduce a clear coat, but I do use Windex to thin Tamiya colour for spraying. The white goes a bit bluish when reduced but the blue hue is unnoticeable after spraying or it disappears as the Windex evapourates. Not quite sure which yet.


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

_AM_sig_zps00cdfd1a.jpg

 

Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

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I googled windex images and there are 5 of them (different colours) 2 are blue. I'm figuring it's a blue one you use Ember if the white has a slight bluish tinge to it. But which one?

Edited by Wobble

bram1_zpsfkhrhndv.jpg

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Regular garden variety bright blue Windex that I get from my supermarket shelf.

 

Oh... I see the problem now. The glass cleaning original variety.

6.jpeg


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

_AM_sig_zps00cdfd1a.jpg

 

Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

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Yes, Wobble/Ember - that's the one I used.

Yes, it does add a bluish tinge to the mix in the paint jar - but it sprays out clear.... guess it has to be really thick before it makes any difference....

There might be a micro-shade difference in hue - but my eyes are not good enough to pick it.... my Box Brownie probably could - but blue would be a better option than yellow - they are almost at the opposite ends of the colour spectrum.... so, if the result was unacceptable for a pure white - maybe a speck of yellow into the mix to reduce the blue... at the risk of making it green........

 

frats,

Rosco

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There are so many different paint types that go under the heading of 'acrylic.' If trying something new it is probably best to do a test with a small amount of paint and a couple of drops of the proposed thinning agent. If they mix easily you're onto a winner.


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

_AM_sig_zps00cdfd1a.jpg

 

Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

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