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dazza

Body Post Repairs

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Hi how is the best way to repair the body posts where the screws go into the shells....

 

Cheers Dazza.


Midwestern Model Raceway.

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Have a look at NZ Group 5 build thread as well. Mine were not broken but I beefed up to prevent breakage.

 

Regards Chas Le Breton

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Wrap the post with sewing cotton and coat with CA.


Outside the box looking in.

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You don't own stuff: Stuff owns you!

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Having a cold drink on hot day with a few friends is nice, but having a hot friend on a cold night after a few drinks - PRICELESS.

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Hi Miveson.

 

I firmly glued mine in place then glued very light axle spacer over top once I was happy with finished height. Whole addition seems to have lasted so far and added no more than 0.5gm overall weight to body.

 

Regards Chas Le Breton

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Hi miveson, I use Selleys Quick Fix Supa glue. It comes in a small bottle and has a brush in it like nail polish has. Wipe most of the glue off the brush then poke the brush in the hole and swizzle it around. Let it dry and repeat if necessary until hole is filled enough to accept the screw. Make sure it's bone dry before you try the screw or you'll be worse off than with a loose screw.

 

edit- wrong answer - I didn't read the whole tread. Maybe try gluing in a bit of sprue out of a kit

Edited by Wobble

bram1_zpsfkhrhndv.jpg

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Ok - I'm new school to an old hobby... but - in my newly found ever enlightening additions to skills and knowledge - from the radio controlled helicopter aspect.... try c/a baking soda.

I have applied this to some near 40 year old slot cars - where I had reamed out mounting threads by not back-winding until the "drop" was felt before screwing down mounts.....

 

the chaps in the heli forums put me onto c/a and baking soda... you slop a dob of c/a onto whatever you want to build up - the sprinkle copious amounts of baking soda onto it..... let it cure out and then sand/drill/ream/tap - whatever you need... it doesn't become too brittle.... mine have thus far lasted for all endurance races...

 

I have even managed to fabricate some old Scaley guide post holders using this method - along with some styro card... and some circuit board pins to located the terminus of the guide travel limits...... this had now been effectively upgraded to my Scaley C17 Ferrari and C16 Lamborghini..... or numbers reversed... so far, grand-kid proof...

 

frats,

Rosco

Edited by rosco01

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Ok - I'm new school to an old hobby... but - in my newly found ever enlightening additions to skills and knowledge - from the radio controlled helicopter aspect.... try c/a baking soda.

I have applied this to some near 40 year old slot cars - where I had reamed out mounting threads by not back-winding until the "drop" was felt before screwing down mounts.....

 

the chaps in the heli forums put me onto c/a and baking soda... you slop a dob of c/a onto whatever you want to build up - the sprinkle copious amounts of baking soda onto it..... let it cure out and then sand/drill/ream/tap - whatever you need... it doesn't become too brittle.... mine have thus far lasted for all endurance races...

 

I have even managed to fabricate some old Scaley guide post holders using this method - along with some styro card... and some circuit board pins to located the terminus of the guide travel limits...... this had now been effectively upgraded to my Scaley C17 Ferrari and C16 Lamborghini..... or numbers reversed... so far, grand-kid proof...

 

frats,

Rosco

Some cool tips there Rosco...

Any chance of a pic or two of the scaley guide repairs?

 

 

Thanks

Michael

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I'll try and jump on it this afternoon - lots on today - gotta get the caravan back into storage.... then chase up a new diff centre for the EK.... should have some time after that....

 

I refused to retro-fit a Scaley upgrade guide mount into the models - there isn't enough room under the body to incorporate the short stem guide AND the mount AND the leads.

 

These two models are chassis-less - and the front of them is very low to the track.... so, when Kevin replied stating that he believed I'd struggle with a conversion - and that he couldn't locate any replacement mounts - I leant on my scratch-building skills to fabrictate something....

 

the original brass legged mounts and guides were replaced some 25 years ago with the next progressive upgrade by Scalextric.. it was a relatively easy conversion...but, not having a chassis - results in the mount and guide needing fitting to the body....

 

I believe I used the mount and guide from a UOP Shadow (they were our new cars back then) - and I found that the clips/slots fitted into the C16 and C17 quite easily - without too much alteration to the body....

 

I used stryene card in differing thicknesses to build up a mount - then drilled the guide pin hole. A Dremel lent itself very well to carefully gouging out relief in the mount for the guide to pivot on/in.

To limit throw - I drilled two holes for circuit board pins - then ground the excess off.

Positioning these two pins was probably the most critical of all the upgrade.... too far forward and it would prevent the guide from turning far enough - too far back and it would not stop the guide turning 180 degrees..... too close and it wouldn't pivot - too far out and it wouldn't stop it.... so, that one location was the crux of setting the modification up.

 

As you will see - my efforts are not OEM looking - but they do work - and afford continued use of the non-chassis models.....

 

Now - a question for those who have successfully upgraded older Scaley models...

 

There used to be a back-yard retailer who had his own track for hire here in the outer eastern suburbs... name witheld - I purchased my Alan Jones MRRC FW07 from him.... and just twinked my little beady eyes on a body laying around in his spare parts bin..... a Scaley 240Z..... body, windows and cockpit only.

 

I have just ordered a Slot-It HR-2 RTR chassis for this model..... anyone completed such a build?.... any tips.....

I don't believe it will be a fast car... but I'd like to get it on wheels and around the track - having looked at it for over 25 years now - vowing to one day get it running....

 

pix later today - I hope....

 

frats,

Rosco

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@Shadow_Rusty

 

Michael, rather than swamp this thread - I'll start a new one on my work to upgrade the guide post mount.... no pix yet... didn't get home until late yesterday.. but will jump onto it this morning...

 

Post will be a new thread in Workshop..

 

frats,

Rosco

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Ok folk - timing is everything.... yes, although I "always" reverse screws into plastic before threading them to get that "drop" as the threads of the screw flop over the starting thread of the plastic mount.... I managed to turn down one of the mount screws in a Slot-It GT40 tonight.... don't know how it happened... I only ever "tweeze" a screwdriver gently between my thumb and forefinger until it seats... but this time.... it just kept going..... and I knew it was stripped....

 

So, out with the C.A. and baking soda.

I cleaned up the gap with a #1 X-acto blade and coated the outside of the post with CA.... then spread some baking soda over the broken slit and held it together with a pair of fine tipped bent pliers....... filed off the excess and voila - screw now locks body down to chassis as good as ever....

 

I read somewhere that it's possible to cut a piece of styro tubing larger than a post.... and fit that over the broken section.... I believe you could fill the resulting hole with CA and baking soda.... let it completely go off - then drill and tap the now solid post..- and, of course - you'd use a BA screw in lieu of the coarse threaded screws most models come with.... might even add a nut into the CA/Baking soda drilled out hole then re-apply the mix to secure the nut......

 

frats,

Rosco

Edited by rosco01

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screw now locks body down to chassis
not too tight...body loose even.

John Warren

Slotcars are my preferred reality

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Thanks Munter,

can I ask why not to tighten the body/chassis mount screws down?

 

I'm guessing it is to prevent the body distorting the chassis?

 

When you suggest "loose even" - I assume it is to the point of there "just" being a little feel of a rocking - not necessarily visual?

This, I expect is to establish that the chassis is rigid in its own right - and the body is just sitting on it...... ? could be entirely off the beam here....

Do we fit neoprene washers or some form of insulation between the post and chassis?.... I suppose I could take off the same amount of thickness from the body post (finally got back on topic) to compensate for the addition of a thin neoprene washer.

 

Speaking of chassis's - I will make up a steel plate today to attempt to straighten one of these 5 GT40 chassis.... following the download doc on Slot-It.

 

I now believe all mine are all out of true... not by much - but I can detect it just by visual looking at the wheels when they are all set at a measured distance from the chassis.

I measured the diameter of the tyres - and also the distance from the axle to the chassis with a digital vernier.... when setting up the suspension and bushes. When I look along the length of the chassis - the tyres do not align in one plane...

 

I don't have a set up plate, but might make one out of the chassis straightening plate I cut out today.... and just drill a series of holes through the centre of one end and then grind it out with the dremel for the guide slot.

 

Is there a reason people use aluminium for a set up plate.... I could appreciate that it is to avoid any pull from magnets if using steel..... beyond that, I'm clueless........

 

I'll try to straighten the unassembled GT40 kit chassis first.... this one is going to be my experimental GT40.... I've ordered a 25k/180 gm/cm Slot It motor for it (yellow)...I don't have to adhere to any class/club rules - not a member of one (yet... don't even know where the closest one is.... yet) so I can pretty much play around with this model.

 

I have also ordered some ally hubs for this one.... and plan to add some weights here and there - I don't run magnets..... please, don't anyone start a thread war on magnets/not... I like mine to run free and enjoy running up to the point where they drift a little before letting go.... just me, I guess....

 

Can anyone give me indication of the difference between the standard/stock 21.5k (orange) Slot-It motor and the 25k (yellow) one... these numbers are yet to mean anything to me other than a higher output potential.... there is both more rpm and more torque... but I don't yet appreciate just how much... I was going to go with the 29k (red) motor... but this time thought I'd just step one one level....

 

I have also ordered the Tyre Razor, Wheel Buddy and some spares from Jon.... hope the aeroplane gets a tail wind........ if anyone wants to know PM me and I'll give you the cost (at today's ((Sunday, 05 Oct 14)) exchange PayPal rate.

 

Now to glue some tyres to hubs.....water based contact cement.... guess the big red hammer place will have that.....?

 

thanks again for your comments, Munter - much appreciated.

 

frats,

Rosco

Edited by rosco01

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Hi Rosco, as Munter has stated 'even loose' pretty much does what you have guessed and the 'looseness' can differ entirely from 1 model to another although 1/2 to 3/4 wind-back is a good place to start and no insulating washers etc are necessary. One of my cobbers runs a slightly modified and well tuned Monogram Greenwood Corvette (still on stock chassis) and replaced the standard screws with some almost twice as long to allow him to get about 2mm body float. Seemed too much to me but that car is almost impossible to keep up with, with anything on his track. This is on routed track and he does have 'home track' advantage but he reckons it has a lot to do with how the car runs.

Edited by Wobble

bram1_zpsfkhrhndv.jpg

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can I ask why not to tighten the body/chassis mount screws down?

 

I'm guessing it is to prevent the body distorting the chassis?

 

When you suggest "loose even" - I assume it is to the point of there "just" being a little feel of a rocking - not necessarily visual?

Yes

 

The orange endbell is a good unit.....get everything else sorted on your cars before you bother with a motor upgrade....they are mostly unnecessary anyway.


John Warren

Slotcars are my preferred reality

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Pleasure, Miverson.... it's not my idea.... I stole it from the micro-heli forums...... I have repaired many of my birds using the method - and they seem to stand up to my inept pilot skills....

 

Thanks Wobble and Munter.... message received.

I am currently fabricating a 5mm steel plate to straighten the chassis of all these models.... I have a lovely Pyrex dish (shhhhhh!) that won't get noticed missing for a few days.... might have to shout her out to dinner if she makes sounds in the kitchen that she can't find it....

 

I'm not using the "oven" method - but will cover the dish and try to keep it warm by wrapping towels around it.... apparently from what I've read - it's the long, slow cooling down process that does all the work... I have quite a number of magnets now from models.... and also some little disc rare-earth ones... should be able to follow the pic in the thread to place them at strategic points around the chassis.....

 

Yes, will keep some "play" in the chassis/body mount....

 

I have really blown this thread apart into different off topic tangents.... apologies to the forum.

 

frats,

Rosco

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Bump to previous post..... spent 3 hours making up a 5mm plate of steel - 190mm x 100mm.... ground it perfectly true using an oil stone.... well, there might be half the thickness of a sheet of printer paper in the maximum to the minimum... but I believe it's as good as you'll get from a metal supplier.

 

Marked out the centres and length of the GT40 chassis on it... held it in place at "strategic" locations with magnets...

Pre-heated with boiling water it in a Pyrex dish - then drained that and poured fresh boiling water over it...... placed a wooden chopping block over that and wrapped the entire thing with a folded towel...it's sitting in this room on carpet... and that would have been pre-heated as well.

 

That should slow the cooling down process..... check it tomorrow when I get up.... should still be warm - but I'll leave it until the water goes cold...

 

Again, digressing from the original post..... which was body post repairs.... maybe I should have started a new thread..... member's thoughts.....?

 

frats,

Rosco

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