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Shane what motor configuration can be used in the slot.it class?

 

This might help answer your question

 

BODY:

1.Only the original unmodified Slot.It group C in-line chassis is allowed.

http://www.auslot.com/forums/index.php?/topic/16727-classes-and-rules-for-the-2014-scale-model-nationals/

 

Jason


Brooksy

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Guest jazzbell

Great thread Shane. Why did you measure the front and rear track widths in the 917 build?

 

Hi Mac,

 

Measurement on the 917, front width works best for me there,the rear is starting point and work my way out. just depend on track conditions.

 

Rear measurement you can not go any narrow with the gluded and trued NSR foam wheels or the NONE gear side will hit on the chassis.

 

regards shane a

 

team thunderbird

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Guest jazzbell

Some more of the Slot.it build in post 21.

 

tyres and chassis.

 

regards shane a

 

team thunderbird

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Hi Shane,

Are you going to do any build info threads on the metal chassis classes? I'm sure there are some people here that are contemplating entering for them that would appreciate the help.

Cheers

Alan

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Guest jazzbell

Alan if i have time ill do a build.

 

Chris know weight limit in the Slot.it and NSR class.

 

Regards shane a

 

Team thunderbird

Edited by jazzbell

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Hi Shane,

I hope you can find the time. I'm thinking of entering the plafit GT div 2 and am keen to see some build tips for them. Also thanks for the above info.It's nice to see from other's work I on a similar track.

Cheers

Alan

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This thread is a build for the 1/24 Nascar class using Revell/Monogram model kit bodies. Usually the white body kits are lighter than the Pro Finish kits, I do like Pro Finish Chev Monte Carlo's and will use that body for this build. While this chassis is about as basic as it gets, there are a few tricks to getting the best performance out of them. Also, the cheap plastic spring clamps from Bunnings are handy for building these cars.

 

Step 1: Bare Chassis Give the chassis a once over. File the underside and vertical axle uprights to remove any metal burrs from the laser cutting. Lay the chassis on a setup board check for twist and use an engineers rule to look for reasonable flatness. No need to sand the chassis perfectly flat like a Plafit, just tweak it in your hands with a straight edge and setup block.

 

5foh.jpg

 

Step 2: Rear End Rear end setup is pretty important with these cars. I use 3mm Plafit axles and oilites on the rear so a JP spur gear can be used (they are the best IMO). You can still use the standard 1/8" rear setup, but may struggle getting a decent gear mesh. If you are handy, you could also ream out a JP spur gear to 1/8". Start by bracing the rear uprights with a piece of stainless wire bent to shape. I use 1.6mm TIG welding rod soft soldered across the back.

 

h39u.jpg

 

xhdb.jpg

 

Next the oilites need to be soldered in and there is usually quite a bit of clearance between the chassis axle holes and the Oilite. This will require a bit of improvisation with how you choose to do it if you don't have any fancy jigs, but the aim is to get the axles at the same height from the bottom of the chassis and parallel with the front axle. I have used a couple of aluminium blocks to pack the axles up and then shimmed the bottom of the chassis to line it up with the oilites. Insert the front 1/8" axle (after checking it is straight) and pull the axles together using rubber bands.

 

ih74.jpg

 

Put a small tack of solder on the top of the oilites while holding the axle down on the blocks to get the height correct.

 

7p2s.jpg

 

Now measure the distance between the axles on both sides of the chassis which is likely to indicate the axles are not parallel. On the side that has the shortest measurement, heat the solder tack and move the axle back a bit and re measure. This might take a couple of goes and needs a bit of feel, but isn't that hard to do. Ideally you are looking for around 0.1mm difference on both sides, over 0.2mm is a bit too much.

 

lgkr.jpg

 

2f3m.jpg

 

When happy with the dimensions of the rear end, fully solder the oilites with the axles in and start at the bottom so you don't melt the top tacks of solder used for positioning. The axle should slide nicely in and out of the oilites. Rear end is now finished.

 

hs0q.jpg

 

I use the green wall plugs and brass screws available from Bunnings. The screws should have a straight shank a few mm down from the head so the body can float nicely without catching the screw threads.

 

fbea.jpg

 

For the front axle, I machine a small groove and use a 3mm circlip for the independant front end. The other end has a the wheel grub screw fitted.

 

na54.jpg

 

Roll the front wheels in super glue and re finish on the tire grinder to remover the rubber dags with wet and dry sand paper.

 

igky.jpg

 

Install front and rear axles with the wall plugs screwed up tight.

 

v12i.jpg

 

Slowly grind down the wall plugs so the body sits nice and even. 10 cent pieces under the front and sides work pretty good. Don't go any lower or the body will drag on the track when cornering.

 

94l4.jpg

 

When happy the body is sitting right, some guys use Shelly's Multi Grip which is very good and flexible, but can attack the body plasic in some cases. Lately I have been using contact adhesive which seems to work well. Insert some plastic gussets to re-inforce the body posts.

 

3sxf.jpg

 

When the body is mounted, insert the glass + interior. I like to solder the motor in at two points opposite the brush end to avoid excess heat into the com. I use the bunnings plastic clamps to hold the motor in position.

 

21rb.jpg

 

Finished roller with a bit of weight near the motor.

 

yrdx.jpg

 

Body is now mounted with some movement and the car is finished.

 

smbd.jpg

 

First outing was respectable, a nice smooth car to drive. Not as quick as some of the other cars, but keep it in the slot and you will be rewarded. (ignore white lane lap times, I was driving Chris's rocket!!)

 

kaul.jpg

Edited by Camber

Hoo Roo

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Sorry to back track but how often does the chassis straightening process need to be done, only once or more often? cheers and a great help to us newbies.


2019 NZ RTR Nationals Gt 3rd

2017 NZ RTR Nationals NSR Classic 2nd

2017 NZ RTR Nationals Group C 3rd

2017 NSR Classic Challenge 3rd

2015 NSR Classic Challenge 2nd

2014 NSR Classic Challenge 3rd

2015 Garden City Invitation Overall Champion

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Branco if you're asking about plastic chassis cars, it doesn't hurt to check they are still flat occasionally. Even more so if you were preparing for a national event.

Edited by nvmyre

5 x National Champion

2 x National Enduro Champion

2 x HBMRC V8 Supercar Enduro Champion

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Thanks for the reply Craig. Yes plastic chassis for group c and nationals maybe.

  • Upvote 1

2019 NZ RTR Nationals Gt 3rd

2017 NZ RTR Nationals NSR Classic 2nd

2017 NZ RTR Nationals Group C 3rd

2017 NSR Classic Challenge 3rd

2015 NSR Classic Challenge 2nd

2014 NSR Classic Challenge 3rd

2015 Garden City Invitation Overall Champion

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Very informative write up Cam, look forward to seeing more...


1x Australian National Champion

 

PhD/Associate Professor in Chemical Engineering for Slot Car Tyres

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1/24 Nascar build now finished.

Jim Patto is a guru on these things, he may be able to input anything I have missed.

 

Cheers,

 

- Cam

Edited by Camber

Hoo Roo

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Guest jazzbell

Hi guy's time for another build,this one is for the Ninco GT class. Great class this one with plenty of great looking cars.

 

This build i'm going to show the Mosler MT900,my opinion still the best race car Ninco have released in the GT range. Track record proves that with the amount of wins this model has had.

 

Key tip on any Ninco build is make sure you have everything flat,parts move free and most of all the rear end is braced well.

 

The rear end bracing i'll show is how i do mine.People have all sorts of methods for this. I don't think there is a right or wrong way as long as it works. It is a MUST though.

 

First step i always lay out the parts after i strip the car. I've gone the lightened car. i like the idea with having the light body so then i can transfer the weight down low on the chassis for better handling.

 

mosler2014001_zpsb668c374.jpg

 

As the top picture shows i've already got the chassis ready to straighten. The steel plate loaded with the magnets than into the boiling water.

 

mosler2014004_zps8f21c627.jpg

 

While the chassis is curing in the water i then start truing the front wheels.

 

mosler2014002_zps865239fa.jpg

 

Once both fronts are trued i then roll the wheels in super glue. The picture me rolling the glue on the fronts is the cleanest and best way to roll the glue even i believe. Running on the gloss tracks this a must to stop the friction on the fronts touching on the track surface.Stops fronts having any front end grip and causing handling problems.

 

mosler2014003_zpsbe7835a0.jpg

 

 

Now to start on chassis.

 

The first thing i always do is just dremel or file each end where the motor clips into.The hole idea of this is when the motor is placed in the chassis it just falls in with know force at all. This allows the chassis to remain straight, press fitting the motor will make your flat chassis bend.

 

mosler20141001_zpsda593ca8.jpg

 

The process above i also do on the bearing hangers. jUST THE SLIGHTEST file or it can put everything out of square come time to glue bearings. Reason for a slight file is if you press fit the bearings you have the chance

of cracking the bearing hanger in the centre and also the pressure of the tight fit of the bearing will pull the chassis out of flat.

 

Picture below i put pressure with the axel just to make sure all sits flat and axel moves freely from side to side.

BREARINGS ARE THE LAST THING I GLUE IN NINCO BUILDS.

 

mosler20141002_zps2259fc25.jpg

 

Now i move onto fitting the motor and bracing.

 

I dont go overboard with the glue or it can twist everything out of place. I just use a scriber or any thing with a point on the end,touch of glue and place where needed. In the case both ends of the motor.

 

mosler20141003_zpsa20af725.jpg

 

The bracing on my nincos has been what works for me. In the picture below i brace in three sections.

I use plastic and stainless steel.

 

First is the small plastic between the motor and the bearing hanger on the gear side. This stops the flex of the chassis. Without this you can hold the chassis and the hole rear end can twist. So of course not having this tiny piece this will help the ninco hop and shutter as we say.

 

Second is the plastic piece between the bearing hanger and motor. This acts as i said above,without it too much flex in the rear end will cause the ninco shutter and hop.

 

Third is my stainless steel plate.This is more of a rear end strength plate. Over the years this small plate has been my winner in the mosler set up. Depending on track conditions i tend to change this plate. Shape is always the same,plate thickness can vary from .5mm to 2,5mm.

 

mosler20141004_zps53db4475.jpg

 

After all the bracing and motor are all glued in i then glue my rear bearings in.

 

Reason i leave the bearings last to glue is i like to make sure everthing is all flat .Gluing parts can twist the rear so the bearing hanger only has to sit up just that little it will create shutter,hop and pulling to one side under brakes into corners.

 

Measure with verniers to make sure.

 

mosler20141005_zps7ec4831c.jpg

 

Now it's place the rear end together. Front wheels and lead wire. I use the pro race guide and have never used the spring. Find car handels better with out spring. With know scx pro braid the next best thing i've found is the NSR braid. Good life and very thin to get the nose down.

 

mosler20142002_zps58131f1c.jpg

 

stunning looking car

.

mosler20142001_zpsa8acb534.jpg

 

Hope this can help in any way.

 

regards shane a

 

team thunderbird

Edited by jazzbell

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I am applying a few of these tips to simple scaley cars with great results at Tbirds thanks Shane your willingness to share knowledge with all is a credit to you and your commitment to slot racing.

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Guest jazzbell

Hi guy's nothing better than spending a Australia night building a slot car and watching Mad MAX 2 .

 

Grass Roots Racing build this one,SCX nascar. I prefer the areo over the Cot cars. If anyone is still looking on getting the hands on the Aero Thunderbirds raceway here in Adelaide has them still.

 

Strip down first.

 

mosler20143001_zps4331ffbe.jpg

 

Then i'll start by breaking the bearing support holders off so this can help for body rock. Rules allow this.

 

mosler20143002_zps17f029f4.jpg

 

Helping with the body rock i scrap a little off the chassis and a touch on the inner edges of the body.

 

mosler20143003_zpse9b88a49.jpg

 

Next step i like to place the motor cradel and rear end and mesch the pinion and gear. With the Scx if you do this and its your first time be very careful not to melt the gear .heat gradually. You'll hear the change in sound and when you turn it over you'll feel it free up.

 

mosler20143008_zps4baf2d8a.jpg

 

After happy with this i then pop the rear end to work on the tyres and run in the motor.

 

First i sit the motor and free run it on 3 volts and work my way up,then i reverse the polarity.

 

mosler20143009_zpsdc9ae3ab.jpg

 

While motor is running in i'll glue and true the rear tyres. MJK tyre for this class.

 

mosler20143010_zpsb60b92b1.jpg

 

I always glue the MJK but i know 99% dont. Just run a slight bead around then all ready for truing.

 

mosler20143011_zps90f3f462.jpg

 

This process of truing i also do with the fronts.Minimum clean up so i dont loose to much on the diameter so i dont loose to much top speed.REAR TYRES THAT IS.

.

mosler20143012_zps79c1b643.jpg

 

Now i'll set the guide up.

With the Scx they have that up and down movement what can interfear with power pick up so a simmple bit of 4mm hose stops that .

Shown in picture below the guide is in, just slip it over.

 

mosler20143006_zps8a9c1b9a.jpg

 

Now the guides in i fit the rear end and front wheels and set up to glue the cradel in.

MOST IMPORTANT PART OF THE BUILD. Chassis and cradel all sitting square. What i do is place on set up block,make sure fronts touch and all four corners are even front and rear.

 

mosler20143015_zps67c5a4d4.jpg

 

mosler20143014_zps7d7120a3.jpg

 

Happy how good thats gone now i glue the cradel

 

mosler20143016_zpsf8fccb18.jpg

 

Ater the cradel is glued and the car is sitting square i then glue the rear end axel bushes.

 

mosler20143019_zps1b80cbb4.jpg

 

Last important thing i do is some lead wire on the pick ups. A MUST if you dont want power problems. Just solder from the motor pick up to the chassis pickup.Then i place a little weight down the sides of the motor,little weight up front.

 

mosler20143013_zps37d9d94e.jpg

 

 

BAM ,Now we have a race car.........

 

mosler20143018_zpsf61aef26.jpg

 

regards shane a

 

team thunderbird

Edited by jazzbell

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No wonder the ratio of posts on this forum is about 50:1 in favour of 1/32.

Its not that Auslot is 1/32 biased, its just the 1/32 manufacturers have got it so right! To see how easy Shane explains it is to blueprint this car, the lack of "extra performance bits" required, and the low price point certainly give 1/32 great appeal.

Edited by axman

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Guest jazzbell

 

the low price point certainly give 1/32 great appeal.

 

Kim how's this for low price,

 

All the RTR 1/32 classes that I've won at Model Car Nationals from 2011 at Hornsby up until last year 2013 have all been the same cars with know new tyres or other parts.The cars with screw on wheels come off and I keep them in a sealed bag in the fridge then they come out 12 months later.

 

My Scx Nascar that's had the same set of of tyres for 4 years had some test time last week,guess what,still lapping the same times as I won with in 2012 in Adelaide. The wheels don't come off so I keep the hole car in a sealed bag.

 

Still even got scrutineer stickers all over the cars.

 

Regards shane a

 

Team thunderbird

Edited by jazzbell

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Hi Guys

Are we going to see any set up tips for the Plafit classes? Particularly in my case for Plafit 32 Div1/2.

If so that would be great! I've got one sitting here on the bench and not really sure where to start.

Cheers

Alan

Edited by lenny broke

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