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TrickyD

Dremmels

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I'm starting out from scratch and intend to get myself ssd track to build a scorpius setup.

 

In my travels on the net in forums like this I quite often read about using a dremmel.

 

Which model will be most useful for slot cars?

 

I see they have a hobby version 300 for sale fairly cheaply. Is this what is being used by the people on these forums?

 

regards, Ricky

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They all are, I got one from Aldi a while back, its it great and came with lots of attachments. I am not a brand name person so so long as it works well thats good enough for me.

It has variable speed and an attachment extension. When you are looking make sure you get the attachment extension it lets you get into tight places.


Cheers Grant

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I went for the real thing. Baseline and a flexi-drive one. But it could be better. I'd like a control on the flexi head. And I should've gone for a higher revving unit because that way I could use it for glass engraving.


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

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I use the Dremmel 8200 variable speed cordless model for the jobs that need a bit more oomph but I do still like to use my $20 Ozito which fits in the palm of my hand, the dremmel is just a bit too big to handle some of the more delicate jobs I like to do with the Ozito.

 

Matt

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I use the 300 model with variable speed and flexi drive......great tool


John Warren

Slotcars are my preferred reality

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I went for the Dremel 400 this time, with flexi-drive. Being mains powered it is heavier than the 300, but with more grunt. I leave the unit hanging on it's stand, and just use the flexi -drive. It came with a good number of accessories, and I just waited till the hardware place had a "we pay the GST" special store-wide to get it a bit cheaper.

 

Before that I had the Supercheap Auto house brand thing, and it did good service for about 3 years for only a few bucks. But the dremel IS a much more refined beast, and lots more revs.

 

I have only two extra tool ends - a mandrel which I use for trimming down wheels for inserts, and for grinding resin out of bodies etc, and a metal cutting disc like a tiny circular saw blade, which is great for trimming chassis, and other jobs where the fragile "cut-off discs" melt plastic and gum up.

Those two tool ends and the cut-off discs - I use for cutting axles etc, and the flat stones for grind/polish jobs are the 4 main accessories in use


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Oh. I invested in a chuck for mine. So much easier than the collets. Means I can use it for the finest drill bits.


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

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Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

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I've placed an order with Santa for the 300 model with the flexitool. I'll have to report back once I start putting it to use..

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@ Scotty...the 300 kit is a good starting point...it does everything I need except as Lynne suggests, using very fine drill bits.

 

I was initially worried about the collet arrangement but things have worked out well.


John Warren

Slotcars are my preferred reality

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Do yourself a favour and buy the chuck as well. Makes life so much easier. I also received the 'drill press stand' as a present along the way. It gets used quite a bit, though it's not as accurate as I would like. A bit much give in it all. But it does have the advantage of meaning you can use the dremmel as a lathe, sort of.


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

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Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

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Lynn, is this the sucker?

http://www.dremel.com/en-us/Tools/Pages/ToolDetail.aspx?pid=4486

 

Seems like a sensible upgrade


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Yup. That's the one Mark. Means I can use anything from the tinniest pin drill to a big ol' spade bit and the twist of a wrist. Best investment after the Dremel itself.


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

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Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

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For years now, I have been using a MiniTool (German) with a couple of banana plugs, so it plugs into my bench power supply. (variable volts/amps dc) Very versatile, half the size of the Dremel but powerful enough for any slot car job. Bonus is it accepts the cordless Dremel adjustable chuck! Ihave battery, mains and flexidrive Dremels also, but MiniTool is my favourite.


Chris

H.M.C.C

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I bought this from Bunnings For $49.95 Does everything i ask of it

  • 170 Watt Motor provides power to do the job
  • With 183 accessories available make it suitable for most applications and tasks
  • Hanging Ring makes it easy to store when not in use.
  • Variable Speed Dial allows a variety of tasks to be performed as you can adjust your speed to suit the applications
  • Flexible Drill Shaft is ergonomically designed and allows greater control over the tool for precision use
  • 846bc6a9-ef34-47bf-a3bd-436a4d45e0d7.jpg

Edited by jimmi

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I don't have a Dremel or similar, I use a jeweller style flex shaft tool for most of these jobs. It's made by Foredom (USA) but apparently the cheap knock offs will also work well if you pull the shaft down and properly adjust and lubricate it (assembly in poorly-paid Chinese factories can be sloppy).

 

The most useful accessory on mine are the H.8 slender (texta width) handpiece and the 3/32" and 1/8" size mandrels for 3M sanding rolls. I use these all the time to grind away plastic. These units have very powerful low end torque and the foot pedal allows speeds from 0-18,000RPM. I tend to think that this particular accessory would be useless on a Dremel, which tend to have a low end set at somewhere between 5,000 and 10,000 RPM depending on model.

 

If you get a Dremel or similar I would suggest getting one with the lowest low speed you can if working extensively with plastics. If you only plan to cut brass etc then maybe high speed is more of a concern.

 

Yesterday I used the small sanding drum inside the motor pod of my Carrera Plymouth Fury to grind away some plastic to allow room for a NSR crown and its set screw. This is typical of the kind of work I do with it.


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I listened to the woman speak and now I have a chuck for my dremmel. She said it was good. She said it could hold very small drill bits. She said I should buy it so I did. Now I have a chuck for my dremel. Thank you that woman.

 

Another spec to think about is the diameter of the chuck or collet and the handle size. The Foredom sounds like it might have an advantage if it has a handle diameter of a textas.

The flexi shaft has the advantage of being flexible but also the handpiece is smaller than the machine/motor part. This gives much more manouvreability.

 

I like Burglars comment about using as slow a speed to do a job as possible.


John Warren

Slotcars are my preferred reality

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I also find the Tamiya Handy Drill useful for some jobs. I have the Handy Router as well but haven't used it since the Foredom arrived, as it's torque is very low. These are good for doing jobs which don't require a lot of torque and where you want the tool to bind up rather than chew your work up if you press to hard. The drill can do some slow jobs on plastics that other power drills are too dangerous to use, for example drilling out the windows in those nerdy Star Trek models for lighting etc. I know some guys who do that.

 

I think they are a specialized tool but at $15 each they didn't hurt the bank too much.


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Saw a friends Dremel 8200 at Demon Slots just before Christmas. Nice unit with a slow start.

 

got some money for christmas so thought I'd put it towards one - found one on offer down from £99 to £75.

When I went to pay, the cashie told me theres was an extra 20% if I spent more than £50. Actual price I paid - £59. Not bad!

 

Bought the chuck adaptor and the cutting shroud with the bits for cutting plasterboard etc. This will be used to route some rally tracks in foamex offcuts I collect in work - theres a nice 5ft by 5ft piece sat in my garage waiting for me to have a few spare hours.

 

I've also got he Aldi beast - very good for rough work as it spins up too fast on it's slowest setting for doing delicate work.

 

Sod's law - I just found out Dremel's factory is in Breda in Holland - I spent two months working in Breda a few years back and was unaware - think of the deals I could have got. Still, the job was for Allied Domecq, so I was getting some top quality booze at staff prices. :)


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I listened to the woman speak and now I have a chuck for my dremmel. She said it was good. She said it could hold very small drill bits. She said I should buy it so I did. Now I have a chuck for my dremel. Thank you that woman.

 

Another spec to think about is the diameter of the chuck or collet and the handle size. The Foredom sounds like it might have an advantage if it has a handle diameter of a textas.

The flexi shaft has the advantage of being flexible but also the handpiece is smaller than the machine/motor part. This gives much more manouvreability.

 

I like Burglars comment about using as slow a speed to do a job as possible.

 

Yeah the handpiece size is really good. Where I find it useful is when you have to get a sanding drum into the middle of a chassis or panel laying flat. As the handle is no thicker than the sanding drum on the H.8 unit I can do that easily. Also with the slow speed I can do things like use the sanding drum to grind away slowly plastic inside the pod of my Carrera Fury to make room for the NSR crown. I think I would have had to have done that with a file otherwise, and that probably would have been very awkward. I also used it recently to grind away part of the chassis around the guide on a Pioneer Mustang, as the little spacer that B-NOVA supplies for their guide conversion had popped out and I couldn't get it back in ... I don't think the low speed was absolutely necessary there either, but it did help me be a bit more precise. I eventually got the spacer back in and absolutely slathered it with coats of superglue in between filing it smooth so it should never come out again

Edited by Burglar

ff48s6.jpg

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my dremel is variable speed and 23 years old, just needed a new se of brushes about 10 years ago.

 

just a point about the accessories, cutting tools etc, if you buy the Bunnings 'el cheapo' kit the bits and pieces do NOT last no where near as much as the proper dremel attacthments. some bits cant handle the high revs of the dremel. can be dangerous.

 

'you get what you pay for'....still applies in this case.


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I had to laugh when I was watching one of the later episodes of Battlestar Galactica (2009) the other day and they were using a Foredom SR like mine in surgery. It's a great tool for jewellery or woodcarving but no way would I use a flex shaft tool in dentistry or surgery! Although I have heard it done in some countries.

 

I also see my Paasche H airbrush turning up in science fiction, most notably Blade Runner.

Edited by Burglar

ff48s6.jpg

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My Dad had several old dentists drills in his workshop. The oldest used articulated arms and a very long belt over 7 pulleys, the later model was Flexible drive high speed unit. All his units were slower than today's dremels. How things have changed.


Phil

 

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Hi guys,

 

Hope you don't mind me bumping an older thread but thought someone may find this useful. I play in a smaller scale to most people here but rotary tools are used widely across all scales. I have a 300 series Dremel with a flex shaft and couldn't be happier with it. To echo many other comments, the single best accessory I have purchased is the #4486 chuck. I do a reasonable amount of cutting with the various cut off discs and so decided to make a cutting slide table of sorts using scrap 19mm / 3/4" melamine. The pictures are pretty self explanatry but essentially the upper board on the right slides forward and backward along a channel using common shelf pins. The channel running left to right under the rotary tool is not used (I originally intended to make a left-right slide board also but haven't really found the need). To use, I just wedge the tool snugly between the uprights and clamp it down with a metal strap and some high density foam. A little candle wax on the two sliding surfaces keeps things moving nicely. Hope this helps someone.

 

Cheers,

Michael. ;)

 

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