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Cnc Routering


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#1 Stubbo

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:34 PM

Rather than hijack another thread I thought I would make a couple of comments about my experiences with CNC routering here.

I have had both of my tracks CNC'd.

The first was cut out of one piece of MDF 3600 x 1800.

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I was able to get that routered ( with a rebate for the braid) in 4 pieces and it cost me $215 including the MDF.


My other track was much larger. It measured 6 m x 2.4m

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This was also CNC'd with the rebate. It required 6 sheets of 2400 x 1200 MDF and it cost me $540 includung the MDF and delivery. I was actually surprised at how cheap that seemed, but the job was great.

I fully get the point made in another thread

"Guy's remember these CNC machines may be worth anything up to half a million dollar plus machines. Hourly rates a pretty high
to run a CNC.
I know what our new track was worth to be done here at Thunderbirds and $750 would not have paid for a bend on our track that's how expensive ours was ".



In my line I charge by the hour so I absolutely understand that and I know that these machines can cost plenty and that people need to cover costs. 1 hour is the same for everyone everywhere. And I certainly do not begrudge anyone making a dollar. I am all for it. My point is that if you shop around a bit you might find someone who can do it quite reasonably. I have never even held a router so the thought of doing it myself was a bit daunting. That's why I spent a bit of time hunting around getting a few quotes.

M3Fanatic was quoted $750 for a job that I got done for $215. Maybe there is more competition in Melbourne and that meant I could get a much lower price. Dunno but it is a huge difference. And yes there were some places that wanted mega bucks to do the job. It may work out cheaper to get it done on 2400 x 1200 sheets. As I understand there are more machines around that can handle that size sheet. Not many can do the 1800.

What I am really saying is don't automatically assume CNC routering will be too expensive. Take a little bit of time, do some homework and check it out and shop around. For me on both occaisions CNC was a no brainer, but for some others who have skills in that area then doing it yourself may be the best option. Weigh up the facts and take the path that best suits you.

Edited by Stubbo, 02 May 2012 - 07:12 PM.

Alan Stubbings

#2 Ember

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:46 PM

I have access to two possibilities for CNC routing here. One is a relatively large joiner (Unicraft) and the other is a small, single bloke, business. I would be curious to send the same file to both of them and get comparative quotes.
Computers. They'll never catch on.

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#3 Stubbo

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 06:14 PM

View PostEmber, on 02 May 2012 - 05:46 PM, said:

I have access to two possibilities for CNC routing here. One is a relatively large joiner (Unicraft) and the other is a small, single bloke, business. I would be curious to send the same file to both of them and get comparative quotes.

I can send you the file if you want to try it out.
Alan Stubbings

#4 Ember

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 06:52 PM

Thanks. It'll be an interesting exercise.
Computers. They'll never catch on.

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#5 waytofast

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 01:01 AM

did you just supply a drawing and they did the rest or did you do the computer programming.
2 of my 8 lane tracks cost $1,700 each to be machine routed and i thought that was pretty reasonable for all the work it saved me.
not to mention the MDF dust everywhere.
my other 2 6 lane tracks i did myself.
steve

#6 Stubbo

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 07:03 AM

I provided the Cad file.They did the rest.

An 8 Lane track for $1700 sounds like a good deal.
Alan Stubbings

#7 M3Fanatic

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 09:50 AM

View PostStubbo, on 02 May 2012 - 05:34 PM, said:

M3Fanatic was quoted $750 for a job that I got done for $215. Maybe there is more competition in Melbourne and that meant I could get a much lower price. Dunno but it is a huge difference. And yes there were some places that wanted mega bucks to do the job. It may work out cheaper to get it done on 2400 x 1200 sheets. As I understand there are more machines around that can handle that size sheet. Not many can do the 1800.

What I am really saying is don't automatically assume CNC routering will be too expensive. Take a little bit of time, do some homework and check it out and shop around. For me on both occaisions CNC was a no brainer, but for some others who have skills in that area then doing it yourself may be the best option. Weigh up the facts and take the path that best suits you.


You make some great points here Alan. What seems to have worked against me here in Canberra is that the several places I went to here and in neighbouring Queanbeyan across the border in NSW, did not really want to know or tackle someting out of the ordinary. They were probably flat out doing their usual joinery trade. I'm not holding that against them but it was frustrating from my end as I thought it would have been a relatively straightforward exercise. I am sure there are fewer places here with CNC machines compared to the larger centres; that would also be a factor.

The $750 quote I mentioned was admittedly at the top end but none of the others were too far behind that (that's if any of them were even bothered to give me a quote). Knowing what you paid for the exact same track, and that I was to provide the working dxf files you sent me, the least expensive was about 2 and a half times your cost. I did not think that was reasonable – time will tell if I was correct or not! Maybe I should have got your guy to do it and courier it up to me; perhaps that's an option for the next one. In the meantime, I'm looking forward to tackling mine myself.

Cheers,
Jon

#8 slotmadmac

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 10:32 AM

I really like the look of Stubbo's lastest track and he very kindly sent me his cad file. The price here in NZ was NZ$850 including the mdf. I thought this was pretty good.

Mac
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#9 Frost

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 08:28 PM

Hi everyone, I haven't been sited here often so I feel like I'm butting in... I hope this is relevant but I was just wondering about the
art of track design. I race on a few different home tracks and my dad and I have found space to make one ourselves, which I'm really excited about. I was just wondering though about corners and bends... I would like at least one sweeper that requires some technical ability to find the right acceleration on the controller, as well as a few other corners of various diffiuclty, but who can you know before you rout the thing? It strikes me that for a sweeper particularly, you would need a good idea of the arc needed, in advance. I guess I could copy from some of the other existing tracks around our club but I'd like to offer something different, and I potentially have the luxury of a larger space allowing a unique design, so I'm wanting to keep options open.
I really like the look of both tracks Alan has posted at the start of this thread; if you're still out there Alan, can I ask how you worked out your arcs, angles and corners and if you're happy with how it worked out?

#10 Frost

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 08:29 PM

Oh when I say home trcks I'm still referring to routed tracks!

#11 Stubbo

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 08:54 PM

I was very fortunate to have someone do the work or me. I just gave him a rough idea of what I was after and he did the rest.

There will be others who know a lot more than me and could offer you better advice. For what it is worth though I started by figuring out the size that was available and then drew a rectangle on a page in the right proportions and then just drew different layouts till I found something I liked and then Rob did the rest.

And yes I am really happy. I found that the tricky bits were not where I thought they would be. It was really good to have that element of surprise.

Edited by Stubbo, 03 May 2012 - 08:56 PM.

Alan Stubbings

#12 Perro

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 09:01 AM

If only I knew years ago just how cost effective a CNC routed track was compared to similar sized plastic ones. The saving is enormous. The track below cost $700 all up, that's routed and supplied. An equivalent in plastic is in the order of $2800 - $3000. My only regret is that I should have used the 1/4" braid and not the 3/16". I was trying to keep the 1/32nd look but there are more advantages with the larger 1/4" size.

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#13 Ember

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 09:42 AM

That's a stonking track, Perro!
Computers. They'll never catch on.

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#14 dangermouse

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 11:37 PM

It is a beauty to drive as well - did you spot the chap in the classic t-shirt....

I need to talk to your CNC man Perro - might get my next track CNC routed at the price given I won't be even close to size of your track.

David

#15 Mohawkk

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 08:31 AM

This Is all great info guys, Anyone who has driven in plastic and wood knows what is better but some people just dont have the skills to do it themselves.
This topic should be pinned, and not in the VIC section...
Love,
Kai Posted Image

#16 Ember

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 08:57 AM

View Postdangermouse, on 04 May 2012 - 11:37 PM, said:

It is a beauty to drive as well - did you spot the chap in the classic t-shirt
Wilson, you forgot your fence!
Computers. They'll never catch on.

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Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

#17 Frost

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 07:21 PM

View PostStubbo, on 03 May 2012 - 08:54 PM, said:

I was very fortunate to have someone do the work or me. I just gave him a rough idea of what I was after and he did the rest.

There will be others who know a lot more than me and could offer you better advice. For what it is worth though I started by figuring out the size that was available and then drew a rectangle on a page in the right proportions and then just drew different layouts till I found something I liked and then Rob did the rest.

And yes I am really happy. I found that the tricky bits were not where I thought they would be. It was really good to have that element of surprise.

Sorry for the belated response - thanks for the info, I appreciate it!

#18 miveson

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 07:28 PM

Never mind the fence, look at that slot collection..... how many are on the shelves?





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