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Ember

Somewhere To Experiment

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Those of you who've seen photos of my track attempt will know that there's very little room on the table for much more than the track itself. But that doesn't stop me from wanting to try my hand at other things, specifically buildings. This is the beginning of a wooden garage that will not grace the track, but will become part of a separate but related diorama.

 

The building itself is a hybrid based a little bit on this weatherboard garage

sIMG_0281.jpg

 

And a bit on this corrugated iron one

sIMG_0276.jpg

 

First job is working out the size of the garage if it were full size. The first picture is just big enough to get a car through the door and still be able to exit the vehicle. But, you'll note, it's not long enough to get a 4WD in and close the door. I want my garage to be single bay but big enough to be able to park any of my slot cars in. Looking on the slot car shelf, the longest car I had (at the time) was the Pioneer Mustang. Not really a huge car. But, as I do have a 1:32 scale F100 I figured if I can house this in the garage, most 1:32 cars will fit no problem. Another thing I kept in mind when designing the garage was the size of materials. The classic measurement that continuously turns up is the 8' x 4' sheet (2440 x 1220 mm for we youngsters :))

 

With this measurement in mind I went about making a template out of cardboard.

01pattern.jpg

The door opening is scaled from 8' x 8'. The side wall height is also 8'. Length of the edge on the gable is, you guessed it, 8' to allow for the size of corrugated iron.

 

Having made two sides and two ends, I taped them together and thought I'd test the size against both the truck and a scale person.

02scalecheck.jpg

The size seems believable. So it's onward.

 

The template was disassembled and adjusted slightly. A small window added to the end wall (2' x 3' or 600 x 900mm) and another of the same size added to the side wall together with a personal access door.

03framecutting.jpg

The frame is being cut in spruce. 5 x 6mm for top of frame and 5 x 5mm for uprights.

 

04framecheck.jpg

Test fitting pieces for back wall frame.

 

From here the lengths cut for the frame are stained to give them the old wood look.

05staining.jpg

I stained all the pieces before gluing them together. Gluing prior to staining is likely to cause patches of pale wood as the glue usually repels stain. To colour the wood I have used artists acrylics making a mix of 2 parts raw umber, 1 part ultramarine blue and 1 part black. Because I wanted this to be a clear stain rather than an opaque paint I added an equal quantity of clear glaze medium to the paint. The paint is applied with a brush, left to penetrate for a short while and then wiped back with a soft cloth. The two pale pieces of wood in the lower right of the photo are unstained.

 

When dry I was quite happy with the colour of the wood, but I still didn't think it looked old. So, I attacked the stained wood with knife and scraped it haphazardly to roughen the outline a bit. In some instances I also scraped the wood with a saw blade to roughen it further.

06aged.jpg

Any pale wood that was bared from the scraping was touched up with a bit more stain mix. In the photo above the two pieces of wood on the right are stained but not scraped. The four to the left have been fully 'aged'.

 

Once dry the frame walls can be assembled. Frames for the individual walls were glued together using PVA glue. Then the four wall frames were glued together using C23 (balsa glue) which forms a stronger bond and sets faster.

 

Here I must apologize. I had intended to keep the step by step images going. But I'm afraid I got a little carried away and the next thing I knew I had the frame completed.

07wallframe.jpg

 

Alas, not only were the walls completed, but I realised I had not taken any photos of the roof trusses as they were being created and assembled.

10roofframe.jpg

The trusses are again made with spruce and stained prior to gluing together. The battens are strips of balsa also stained with the same mix.

 

11roofframedetail.jpg

Closer detail of the roof frame.

 

The roof frame will just sit atop the wall frame and will not be glued so that it can be removed if required.

 

The fully assembled frame.

12fullframe.jpg

 

And from the access door side.

13fullframeside.jpg

 

The frame will later be clad with weatherboards cut from balsa. And the roof will be corrugated iron made from corrugated craft cardboard. But more of that some other time.

 

Cheers

Embs

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Very nice work, almost a shame to clad it at all...maybe give it a slight push and only partially clad it giving it that derilict building look.

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You must have the patience of Job Embs! Nice carpentry. like Rob said a shame to cover it all. Maybe it could be left as a " works in progress" on your track.

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Fantastic work Embs!!! All that research is paying off!

What's the gauge of the corrogated card you're going to use?

For my buildings I used what I could get, which was the craft stuff you get in a pack of 6 or so sheets of wonderfull colors like bright pink and white... easily painted, but it sounds like you're onto it....

Although I did manage to pick up a single sheet of corrugated aluminium (I think it is...) at the Melb model railway expo at Sandown earlier this year and the corro's are very fine... a bit closer in gauge than the card. (I picked this up to attempt a bull nose veranda... can't roll the card stock)

 

What will you use for guttering? I haven't added any to my buildings yet...

 

You've inspired me to start another building... but I'm still yet to finish the church and the pub! ;)

 

Great stuff... keep the progress pics coming!

Edited by knoath

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Blimey Embs - you've outdone yourself on that built - I'm blown away with the detail and quality of your workpersonship.

 

Can't wait to see it finished...

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Thanks for the kind words boys. Hoping my ol' Pop would approve of it. 'Though he'd probably point out all the things wrong with it, like the lack of noggins, etc.

 

Rob & Triggy, I haven't quite decided how 'in need of attention' the cladding will be. On the bright side, you will see the internal frame because the front doors will probably be open. Not sure if I'll be able to have them working.

 

Nice frame DM. The doors are something like what I'm hoping for (just in better nick). Any ideas or recommendations on little hinges?

 

Dick, it's the six pack corre sheet. You might notice a strip of the green sheet wrapped around a spray can lid for a tank. It's the same that I used for the rusting sheets of rubbish in the swamp. It might be a bit out of scale, but I don't think it'll matter too much. Particularly seeing as I worked out the width for the weatherboards at around 6mm. Ummm... Shall we say that the palings on the fence are a wee bit big at 10mm wide?

 

Got a bunch of weatherboards cut and stained ready to go. But although they're currently a nice soft aged silver grey, they still look too crisp and new. I'll have to give them a battering before I put them on. Inside will remain raw wood. Outside will get some paint.

 

Been looking at drinking straws for guttering. Split in half and painted for the old round section gutter. Not sure. Haven't come up with a better idea yet though. I picked up a box of really fine ones for 50c that will make for good pipes to the tank. Plenty of ideas, it's just a matter of whether or not I can pull them off.

 

I should've called the thread 'New garage for my cars' D'oh!

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Check out Grandt Line products

 

They are 1/48, they also do 1/24 scale - I either use large 1/48 items (eg nut/bolt castings I get the bigger size) to represent 1/32

 

http://www.grandtline.com/product_lists/quarter_inch.htm

 

http://www.grandtline.com/architectural_pa..._arch_index.htm

 

Maybe

grandt-3524.jpg

3524.....ENGINE HOUSE DOOR HINGES (48)....

 

 

Model Railroad shop should have them - or try here

this chap is on the Gold Coast

http://www.barcourt.com/grandtline.htm

or http://www.railcar.com.au/grandt_line_o.htm or http://www.mrrc.com.au/300-01.htm

 

 

This site has some line drawings http://www.tmrdistributing.com/o-stuff.htm of the parts but is OS...

 

cheers

DM

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Great work Embs! More detailed than mine! I immediately thought to leave it semi-unclad too. I see lots of houses stripped of their fibro and they look just like that!

 

For your guttering, I think it was Dick who thought of using struts from an el-cheapo umbrella, very close to the right shape. I didn't use it on my farmhouse as mine is more like 1:43. Should suit 1:32 though.

Edited by KarKraft

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KK, that would have been Graham Lane from SlotForum with the umbrella struts... great idea!

 

Embs... I used 10mm wide balsa weatherboards for the General Store... by the time you overlap them they will look about 6mm!!!!

Don't go 6mm, they will be too small!!!!!

P1070084.jpg

 

P1070177.jpg

 

Good idea with the straws!

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Actually it looks fine. Can't show you any photos at the moment cos I'm stuck on f%@%ing dial up. But I'll show some as soon as I get this connection sorted out.

 

I was concerned that the finer weatherboards would make the paling fence look wrong, but it's passable.

 

Thanks for the reminder on the 'brolly struts KK. Will have a look around the shed and see if I have any.

 

Did Carl ever come through with those laser cut windows he promised you, Dick?

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Hmmm.... I wonder what happened there. Graham Lane has put the launch of Castello Models on hold because of him too. Then again, I never expected I'd be needing windows of any sort.

 

Some more pictures now that I'm back to normal bandwidth with a new modem.

 

17cladside.jpg

The first wall mostly clad.

 

16inside.jpg

The inside view. This is the important one. It will be seen just like this. The outside will get some paint.

 

14behindfence.jpg

15behindfence.jpg

Behind the fence. Shots taken for size comparison.

 

I'm quite happy with the narrow weatherboards. Although it does make the slab paling fence look big.

 

Cheers

Embs

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Beautiful work Ember.

 

Now, to be a proper shed, the car will have to be parked outside and a scale slot car track occupying the shed space.

 

hmmm. 1/32 X 1/32

 

And, some little cars going around, that would be nice.

 

I know, I know, shut up and get to landscaping......

 

j

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Great work Embs. Love the weatherboards, really authentic.

 

Rusty nail heads ?? or does nothing rust in Hamilton? Does anything happen in Hamilton? :lol: :lol: :lol:

 

A question from the 'ole chippies amongst us. Plum cuts on the bottom of the rafters :huh:

 

You have me thinking Embs. I have heaps of bits I acquired for my track with no space to do the justice

so I might build some off track displays/scenery. How are you going to display yours?

 

Mel

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There'll be no track in this one Johnny. I purposely made it a fairly close fit for the cars. Didn't even leave room for a workbench in the back. Might do something about a standalone workshop elsewhere. Planning on lighting this one with just a single bare bulb hanging from the rafters.

 

Rusty nail heads ?? or does nothing rust in Hamilton? Does anything happen in Hamilton? :huh::lol::lol:

I have been thinking on the rusty nail head side of things. But, figure it's probably the very last thing to do. Will probably just use paint on the fence for a row of nail heads and some rust stains. Not needed on the shed, secret nails. :lol:

 

The roof's not sitting on quite straight in those photos Mel. And I intentionally left them a bit wonky. I had a really authentic twist on the back wall, but that got taken care of when the roof was left on overnight while the glue firmed up.

 

This little collection will be put on a 400mm sq 'board'. It's just another piece of corflute with a slab of polystyrene on it, that has been landscaped. You can see it in those last photos. I wanted somewhere to test things like grass before I tackled them on the track. I figured I can use this little piece for displaying cars or taking photos. Light isn't great in the track room (yet) which makes for fairly ordinary photos. At least this I can take outside.

 

Might even finish up doing anther one with the classic bit of road. But right now I wanted to do something a little different.

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Didn't even leave room for a workbench in the back. Might do something about a standalone workshop elsewhere.

Or it could be that boxy lean-too extension that we see on the back or side on many sheds.

:huh:

 

Very nice work.

Just luv watching things grow like this.

Thanks for sharing it with us.

:lol:

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Didn't even leave room for a workbench in the back. Might do something about a standalone workshop elsewhere.

Or it could be that boxy lean-too extension that we see on the back or side on many sheds.

:huh:

 

Not going to be room behind it. Tacked on the side will be a woodshed. Then the water tank.

 

Maybe the woodshed should become the workshop and just have a wood pile stacked against the side of the main garage. Probably need a rusted half tank dog kennel in there somewhere too.

 

Damn. Looks like I should've gone for a bigger base plate than 400 sq.

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I think there's quite a range that the eye/brain will accept. Same with the width of corrugations on the iron. I don't really think the brain scales things up quite accurately. The paling to weatherboard difference looks less problematic in real life than in photos too.

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Some updated photos. Cladding of walls is essentially done. One side of vehicle door still to finish, plus the gable ends.

 

20rearquarter.jpg

18doorside.jpg

Windows and doors are the next on the menu.

 

19frontquarter.jpg

Please note, the fence is just taped in place for a size reference.

 

21inside.jpg

22inside.jpg

I'm quite happy with the way the interior is shaping up.

 

Corner trims are yet to be installed, and will be 3mm square spruce stained prior to attachement.

 

Really happy with my stain recipe. It's working really well on both the spruce and the balsa. I've actually compared the colours to genuine aged hardwood in my remaining paling fences. The colour on my miniature fence is almost a perfect match. The garage weatherboards being resin heavy softwood, are a suitably softer silver.

 

It's a slow process, but remarkably satisfying.

 

Thanks for taking the time to look in.

Embs

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Bloody hell Embs - r u sure your not a modeller by choice? That 3rd photo is simply brilliant. If only I had your patience!!!! Great, great work, can't wait to see what car you decide to put in it? A ninco classic? Probably a Morgan.

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