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Track Wiring

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In a perfect world . . . . . . . . .

 

We would have had

 

BETA video instead of VHS

 

Microsoft would have sunk without trace, and all PCs would have had an ARM based processor with the main OS built into chip.

 

Our wives would all be raving slot nuts with an addiction to painting scratch-builds

 

And we'd have a perfect connector common to all home and public tracks internationally.

 

rofl_hard_smiley.gif

 

I started this list with the most likely and finished with the least


Recovering Slot Addict :ph34r:  *  Custodian of many used screws (mostly loose :rolleyes:)  *  Total kidder  *  Companion of other delusional slot addicts :lol:  

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As Ember suggested, and in that SlotBlog thread, the trailer plug/socket could be a good option.

Can handle good current if required,

Can handle reasonable size cable,

Reasonable cost,

Polarised.

Designed use is low voltage dc power.

As Phil mentioned, try to get the 'establishment' to change.

:huh:


Steve K.

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Sorry to dredge up an old thread - Just a question re proximity of power supply to driver stations. is it better to have your main tap near the driver stations.

I have a perfect spot for my power supply but it is on the far side of the track - near the rooms power supply, but opposite where the driver stations are.

 

or am I better to run an extension under the track and re- think where I sit my power supply - cheers Pat


They are only toys .... until you pull the trigger.

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I moved my power supply to the race control with 10 metres of 6mm building wire for the connection. I found the cars weren't any slower overall but the racing was cleaner with the cars having a bit less punch.

 

In the past (when running off a car battery) I've also used a coil of about 10 metres of 25 gauge motor winding (enamelled) wire as chokes in the track which smoothed out the acceleration. Without it a Fly Viper would tear out the centre bearing in a couple of laps.

 

Please don't laugh at me for actually having a Fly Viper, we all make mistakes :unsure:


Cheers,

Garry J

Slotworx_Logo_Small.jpg

Old age and treachery will overcome youth and skill

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If the cable size is correct then there should be no difference where the power supply is.

You need to know the voltage you are running at and the possible amperage draw in total, you can then calculate any possible voyage drop in the cable.

 

http://www.bulkwire.com/wireresistance.asp

Edited by kalbfellp

Phil

 

Hobart Miniature Car Club

 

Tassie Resins

 

Email

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I generally favour the power supply close to the track connections as possible and use the thickest gauge wire you can muster.

The 240 volt lead to the power supply can be as long as you need.

Edited by munter

John Warren

Slotcars are my preferred reality

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"Please don't laugh at me for actually having a Fly Viper, we all make mistakes :unsure:"

 

They are fine looking cars Garry - I mean that is about all they are but they are fine looking.....

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Thanks for all the info SLotsNZ and Schuey19.

 

I know this was posted a while ago but I had a (hopefully) quick question about brakes.

 

Can I put a switch on the wire that is between the terminal strip and the red circle in the image below? What I would like to achieve is the ability to turn brakes on or off.

 

I run analogue and am planning on positive polarity as that seems to be the standard.

 

I use DS resistor type controllers and I think doing this will be OK for them. I'm not sure about if I use an electronic controller in the future though if this brake switch would cause problems.

 

Any advice gratefully accepted thanks!

 

 

 

TrackWiringDiagram.jpg

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You would have a potential problem with some electronic controllers in future.

I have found Slot.it - and I think my Difalco both give inconsistent power if the negative pole isn't wired into the controllers for the brakes.

 

But that will only occur only if the switch is in the off position. and with those controllers of course, the driver can control his own braking level from the controller, so it should be a viable solution for everyone so long as they leave the switch in the on/circuit closed position.


Recovering Slot Addict :ph34r:  *  Custodian of many used screws (mostly loose :rolleyes:)  *  Total kidder  *  Companion of other delusional slot addicts :lol:  

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Most of the picture links are broken in this post, and of coarse I wired my track incorrectly and stuffed my controller, so here's how it's done using Australian 240V plug as connector.

Part of this diagram is copied from "Fergy's Place"

NOTE: The colours don't follow any sort of logical colour code except the two wires coming from the power supply.

 

Australian%20slot%20track%20wiring.jpg

Edited by WKM

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Just note that plug pinout varies from State to State around the country, many tracks use plugs and sockets with round earth pin.

 

Good point Phil, I've edited the post.


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