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Non variable PM2122

 

Don't forget you will need to change the polarity of that Scalex track when you get these.

Yup. It will be done. Power supply is sitting waiting, doing nothing currently but damaging toes. Must move it further under the table.

 

Information on wiring found through much searching old threads (see I do spend time trawling through history) here. This the right information to use??? Driver's stations here. Currently looking at station with direction switch only. KISSish.

Where do you fellows get your plugs and sockets for the controllers? The standard is the round earth variety isn't it?


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

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Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

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Non variable PM2122

 

Don't forget you will need to change the polarity of that Scalex track when you get these.

Yup. It will be done. Power supply is sitting waiting, doing nothing currently but damaging toes. Must move it further under the table.

 

Information on wiring found through much searching old threads (see I do spend time trawling through history) here. This the right information to use??? Driver's stations here. Currently looking at station with direction switch only. KISSish.

Where do you fellows get your plugs and sockets for the controllers? The standard is the round earth variety isn't it?

 

Ember I wired my track & controllers with the 2nd diagram you linked. It was pretty easy when I got my head around it. For my plugs I used black clipsal Caravan sockets. I ended up not using the round earth type as they were more expensive & none in stock. I just used the regular type.

 

Good luck with it.


Thanks

Greg

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Thanks MoparD. Looks like a trip to AWM to see what they've got. Trying to keep things as "standard" as possible, to allow for visitation if anyone happens to pass through this neck of the woods.


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

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Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

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[

Yup. It will be done. Power supply is sitting waiting, doing nothing currently but damaging toes. Must move it further under the table.

 

Information on wiring found through much searching old threads (see I do spend time trawling through history) here. This the right information to use??? Driver's stations here. Currently looking at station with direction switch only. KISSish.

Where do you fellows get your plugs and sockets for the controllers? The standard is the round earth variety isn't it?

 

We use IEC plugs and sockets (same as you probably have into your electric jug or computer power plug) as do all the metal chassis tracks here in NZ. They are good as they are capable of fitting three large gauge wires from the controllers.

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What Chris means is HE uses IEC. :)

 

Hard body peoples mostly use XLR connectors - apart from Orakei, an' you really don't want to know what they used....

 

Ember, I'd use IEC (jug plugs) if that's what mostly gets used around Victoria. So long as it is easy to wire, impossible to get in the socket the wrong way around.

If you use what the tribe-of-victoria uses, it makes it easier to visit or be visited, and to re-sell a controller later.

 

Professor Motor site has a good wiring diagram with the correct colour codes on it.


Walks upright Unaided  *  Ties Own Shoelaces  *  Can Mispronounce Own Name In Five Languages  *  Mostly Aims Rattle Cans Away from Self
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Yeah, basic idea is pit lane speed limit, controlled by voltage (and a caution speed for deslots [deslot in essence incurs a penalty]) and in the current model is controlled by a regulator and some electronic wizardry that sets the volts down to 6 going into the controller when you hit pit lane. I thought about the resistor on pit lane with dead strips but it isn't "fixed" in the sense it knocks off a percentage of the max speed. With each lane being variable voltage if I have mine set to 15 and my son to 10 then my pitlane speed would be faster (and caution). Either way, no matter, I just won't be going with a diode based controller. Would 8volts be a fast pit/caution speed? hum, maybe i just try out the track on a vriable power supply to see how fast 8v really is.

 

What I was meaning

- and all assuming your track is wired positive polarity -

- was that the one great fat rotary pot would go on the negative rail that fed all the lanes in common ONLY within the pit area. (the negative rail has to be the one which is isolated from the rest of the track, not the positive one obviously. Since that resistor would be the last thing in the system in terms of wiring, then where-ever it was set, it would equally limit all lanes, whilst the controller would still be "seeing" full voltage at controller point, and seperatetly dropping voltage via the other (positive) gate.

 

..... that should work shouldn't it....? I think.... yeah... should work fine.... I think........


Walks upright Unaided  *  Ties Own Shoelaces  *  Can Mispronounce Own Name In Five Languages  *  Mostly Aims Rattle Cans Away from Self
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Pit lane speed is easily reduced by isolating the tape or braid and adding a link with a rotating switch and some diodes for each lane. I think this will still work with the PM controller as the controller input/ output is still the same.

having controller plugs the same as others in Victoria is the best idea,we all use round earth down here as do some commercial tracks around the country.


Phil

 

Hobart Miniature Car Club

 

Tassie Resins

 

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The pot would work, but are you suggesting two separate grounds?? I could isolate using a diode after it no? (i am not an electronics expert, just enough to get in trouble) Thinking this would be the best solution so I can use the PM controllers and simplify the electronics (immensely). Caution speed could be introduced simply my switching the rest of the tracks common ground to the one with a pot on it. hum, much simpler, much easier. Makes my work on the drivers stations a lot less complex. Sorry for thread jacking.

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The pot would work, but are you suggesting two separate grounds?? I could isolate using a diode after it no? (i am not an electronics expert, just enough to get in trouble) Thinking this would be the best solution so I can use the PM controllers and simplify the electronics (immensely). Caution speed could be introduced simply my switching the rest of the tracks common ground to the one with a pot on it. hum, much simpler, much easier. Makes my work on the drivers stations a lot less complex. Sorry for thread jacking.

 

Yes, you have to run a separate negative line for the pits, with the pot (or diodes) "in the line" of that negative. ie, you isolate the negative on the rest of the track with a break in your tape or braid at each end of the pits, then run the negative feed to the pit area underneath the track and reconnect it with a pot (or diodes) in the line (circuit) of it. - or, as Phil says, run 3/4 separate ones, being one for each lane, and put a separate pot or series of diodes in each one, so that you can vary the voltage by lane if needed.

BUT, if you don't need to control the voltage to each pit lane individually - and I can't see why you need to, because each driver still has a controller, - then I would use a really heavy duty pot like I said above, because a thumping great 50 watt, 25 ohm pot, would allow you to experiment with the voltage/speed, and vary it by class of car to suit.

 

I'm not quite sure I got what you meant by this sentence though.

"Caution speed could be introduced simply my switching the rest of the tracks common ground to the one with a pot on it."


Walks upright Unaided  *  Ties Own Shoelaces  *  Can Mispronounce Own Name In Five Languages  *  Mostly Aims Rattle Cans Away from Self
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I'm not quite sure I got what you meant by this sentence though.

"Caution speed could be introduced simply my switching the rest of the tracks common ground to the one with a pot on it."

 

I am planning on making a full course caution speed so instead of a track call you get a caution, hence penalizing the person who deslots. (there will be a track call too for use during club/proxy races)

 

and thus I can use a relay and some toggles to turn on and off the caution by switching the - side to the pot for the rest of the track

Edited by gzminiz

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No wonder Parma make so much money. How many have you broken?????????? Personally, I've burnt out 1, that's right, 1 in using it for 15 years every weekend and half the days of the week. What ARE you doing to them??????????? :):):lol:

That might be so, but in the last 15 months how many "pods" have you burnt out and circuit breakers have you tripped on different tracks around Sydney ???????????????

 

 

That's right, with an ELECTRONIC controller! :D

 

SlotsNZ, the problem with cooking a resistor is always the same. You said it, kids running too slow for the power available or running high mag which requires more amps creating heat you don't want. Cut the power down and the kids HAVE to move the trigger to get it to go faster between the corners. You can also dial the power down as far as neccessary to make this happen, even if your down to 4 or 6 volts. This way the kids learn how to drive. Electronics won't work at those levels. Basically, it boils down to matching the power level to the drivers.


Stu

 

Old racers race harder

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Great topic valuable info - I emailed Prof Motor to ask about the 14-19 volt thing and recommended controller for a home track running mostly stock cars - he suggested the 2120 he also said that they can add a sensitivity pot for better response at lower voltages.

 

Just trying to get my head around what this would offer - I can understand adjustable brakes but would I notice adjustable sensitivity and if so how?

 

I use Parma 26ohm controllers now.

 

cheers

DM

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Great topic valuable info - I emailed Prof Motor to ask about the 14-19 volt thing and recommended controller for a home track running mostly stock cars - he suggested the 2120 he also said that they can add a sensitivity pot for better response at lower voltages.

 

Just trying to get my head around what this would offer - I can understand adjustable brakes but would I notice adjustable sensitivity and if so how?

 

I use Parma 26ohm controllers now.

 

cheers

DM

 

If you add a sensitivity pot to a 2120, you have a 2116...... Ka-ching.

Okay, the 2120 says "12 - 15" and the 2116 says "14 - 19", but in practice you'll never notice the difference. Andy says he always guarantees the controllers will work with supply voltage at least 2 volts below the bottom 'rating' figure, but I have those exact 2 controllers sitting around my track, and ran both down to supply voltages of 8, and both still worked.

 

The adjustable sensitivity just means that you can tailor the response of any given car so that it feels like you just selected a resistor controller that is best suited for THAT car. Then you change to a different powered car, you can turn the knob one way or the other, and it's like you just swapped resistors again to the right one for THAT car.

 

For example, I'd have the sensitivity all the way up to drive an NC-1 powered car, maybe mid-way for a Slot.it car (any motor), and most of the way down for a Falcon VII or Super 16D powered metal chassis car.

It also depends on the track you're driving, I tend to lower the sensitivity to drive technical, short tracks, so that I have a longer "mid-range" and can be more accurate with speed control - or in other words, if I get my finger with 1mm or "error" in how much I pulled the trigger, it makes less difference to the corner speed of that car, and I look like a bit less of an idiot :lol:

Then for more open race-way type tracks, I wind it way up, because we're talking about much higher minimum driving speeds for any given car, and we only really need control between half and full throttle for most of the track....

 

Ember has a couple of 2120s on the way from a certain forum sponsor in Adelaide, so it will be realy interesting to hear the "take" from someone on a scaley track, experimenting with mag/non-mag, and coming straight off of ~60 ohm scaley controllers.


Walks upright Unaided  *  Ties Own Shoelaces  *  Can Mispronounce Own Name In Five Languages  *  Mostly Aims Rattle Cans Away from Self
 My Track Oakland Raceway V2     Our Club  HMBRC     

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Great topic valuable info - I emailed Prof Motor to ask about the 14-19 volt thing and recommended controller for a home track running mostly stock cars - he suggested the 2120 he also said that they can add a sensitivity pot for better response at lower voltages.

 

Just trying to get my head around what this would offer - I can understand adjustable brakes but would I notice adjustable sensitivity and if so how?

 

I use Parma 26ohm controllers now.

 

cheers

DM

 

 

DM, adjustable sensitiviy can be VERY noticable if it is used correctly or it can be an absolute disaster if not. What it does is delay the delivery of the power to hotter motors at the bottom end of the controller. Sort of feeds it in smoothly. I have used it for years and find it useful in the heat of a race when you lose your cool and punch it instead of feed it. Saves you an off.


Stu

 

Old racers race harder

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Well. They've arrived. They seem HUGE! Will hopefully be able to give report this evening.

Thanks for everyone's input.

 

Embs


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

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Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

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Wooooooooooooooooooooohooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Professor Motor!!! :yellowbounce:

Wiring everything up of course took longer than expected. Doesn't it always?? But OMG that's so much fun!! :purplebounce: :lbluebounce: :bluebounce:

 

First on the track my BMW Maxi WIP (work in progress). Not too bad at 10v (start slow). A bit stop and go, obviously need to pull it to bits and find out whats causing the issue. Wasn't the braid, could be a dodgy wire. HL was running his BMW Maxi (un-tuned with magnets) around the track with copious amounts of smugness.

 

Then, out came the Ninco Classics, Jag vs Cobra. HL's Cobra was the first to cut a lap, running suspiciously true to the slot. 'That's looks a bit odd' thinks I. Picked it up off the track and turned it over. Nothing visible. Hmmm. Sat it down on the table, beside the track, and noticed a bit of movement in a screw sitting beside it. Ahuh! Opened the sucker up and discovered little button magnet sitting just before the motor. Made short work of that, returned car to track and said "Now try." A bit more taily this time (understatement). Left him to play with that and decide what he wanted to do... He'd obviously put the magnet back in it at some stage. We had run it around the track a couple of times under Scaley power and it might be worth the wait.

 

Put the Jag on the track. And away..... 30g weight either side in front of rear wheel. Runs pretty sweet for about 5 laps with freshly cleaned 'n' trued tyres. Then starts to get taily again. Clean tyres again and all's good. Obviously need to find some after market tyres.

 

Chucked some mag cars on the track at the last minute for some 'fanging' laps before pulling the plug. This is where I actually got to feel the differences in the controller as I had a known quanitity with which to compare it. Ooooh la la. Smooooooth. Given I've never used anything other than the Scaley controller, so I have nothing else with which to compare (and anything was going to be an improvement) but that's sweeeet. Reactive. Light even. Not sure if any of these words are making sense to you guys. Then again, you're probably all sitting back nodding your collective heads and saying 'of course'.

 

Yup. Likey. Happy with choice. Thanks SlotsNZ et al.

 

Oh and added bonus, track is every bit as much fun anticlockwise as it is clockwise. Bonus!

 

Cheers

Embs


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

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Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

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Then along came this.........................

 

WIRELESS PWM

 

IMG_0336.jpg

 

Simplicity, just two trim pots...

 

IMG_0339.jpg

 

....and a LCD screen.

 

A simple wireless module we plan to relase in 2010 plugs into your analogue driver station and bingo you have the worlds most advanced controller at your fingertips.

 

IMG_1415.jpg

 

The "module"....simply plug and play.

 

Featuring 320 step hall effect no friction (maintenance free). The control is that exact you can see your neves shaking on the throttle test program!!!

 

Capture4throttletest.jpg

 

Scorpius Throttle Test program.

 

Scorpius comes with free diagnostic tools to set up or troubleshoot any issues. Heck it even tells you the battery voltage!

 

The Scorpius controller has just two trim pots and is simple to use, unlike some with 3 trim pots, swiches and buttons! For those who do not like PCs this is for you, however if you like PCs then also this is for you. We have considered old school racers and new school :)

 

You can set up your controller curve in millions of possible combinations using this program. Or if you dont have a PC or laptop handy you can achieve exactly the same result using the LCD screen and menu. Scroll to "throttle curve", go into each band and choose your PWM setting.

 

To make things easy during the race the throttle curve can also be adjusted manually using the green trim pot, +, - or linear curves can be set, but not complex "S" shaped compound curves which should be set using the PC or via controller menu and screen.

 

ScorpiusfffCapture.jpg

 

Scorpius Controller Set Up program.

 

The controller has a "Learner mode" power setting, just scroll through menu, select Learner mode, change power to any % between 1-100 and thats it. 50% setting using 12V gives 6 V net. Handy if you need 10 or 11V but your power supply is locked in at 12V or 13.8V.

 

Brakes can be adjusted while racing, and a display shows your brake setting between 0-100%, so therefore 100 brake setting possibilities.

 

Traction control will be able to be adjusted using the menu.

 

A vibrator is installed in the Scorpius controller which in conjunction with a race program could alert you of fastest lap time, track record, refuelling alert, changeover during team enduros etc.

 

Power is supplied by two AAA batteries which last months and months. It also features a power saving function so it turns off automatically after 2 minutes of inactivity.

 

A security system stops anyone hacking their channel using a PIN, simply program your controller and module to same ID and PIN and youre secure.

 

Famous Parma casing is used, selected because of its size, weight, balance, strength (drive a car over one), price effectiveness and popularity amongst European analogue enthusiasts for its feel.

 

Wireless is the last benefit, but a beauty, race from any position around the track. Have a big track? You race alone....you deslot at the "far end". You walk to put car on track, you walk painfully back to your driver station, you resume racing. With Scorpius walk to your car, reslot it and go.

Sick of having 4 big blokes around 4 driver stations blocking things up?, spread your drivers around the track using wireless controllers. If self marshalling while just doing fun laps with your mates? Just position each racer on each deslot corner, you have quicker reslotting now.

 

The controller should be a hassle free interface between mind and motorfeel and reliability. It should be an extension of you but not noticeable or cause fatigue after long hours of use.

 

Future upgradeable, wirelessly, with free upgrades. Get the latest controller software in just a few minutes. Simply go to Scorpius website, download file, unzip and drag to desktop. Set "reflash" on controller and click "OK" on PC, thats it, its that simple. You now have the latest program/feature/function. You need just one tiny wireless USB interface (Dongle).....

 

001.jpg

 

Scorpius Wireless USB Interface (Dongle)

 

Developed in Australia :aussie: and beta tested throughout Europe by some of Europes best hard core analogue racers, distributors and retailers where the feedback was all positive. Also featured in Maslot and Car Online slot magazines.

 

Available 2010.

 

Cheers

 

Rick

Edited by aussieslotter

The best form of satisfaction is success.

www.scorpiuswireless.com

 

 

 

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Embs

I am going downstairs to try a little more weight in the Jag :) did you put 30g on each side - I don't have scales but I think I only put about 5g per side will double it and see how it goes.

 

After reading your last post I thought yep that is the way I will go as well - get a couple of PM controllers - then I read Rick's post and wireless sounds very appealing I would imagine standing in different spots would actually give you a slightly different feel of the track - ie the cars coming towards you on a long straight rather than going away...

 

the only draw back I can see with wireless is it might take the "bump" out of slot racing - the occasional hip and shoulder has been effective in catching my 12 year old :aussie:

 

Rick - are we talking early or late 2010?

I assume it is a standard Scorpius controller - so if one was to go digital it would work?

 

cheers

DM

Edited by dangermouse

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Heres a future possible candidate....Scorpius wireless controller with analogue plug in module.

 

Use a standard analogue car, no chipping of cars. Just plug in the module and race.

 

IMG_0336.jpg

 

Simplicity, just two trim pots...

 

IMG_0339.jpg

 

....and a LCD screen.

 

A simple wireless module we plan to relase in 2010 plugs into your analogue driver station and bingo you have the worlds most advanced controller at your fingertips.

 

The "module"....simply plug and play.

 

The controller has a "Learner mode" power setting, just scroll through menu, select Learner mode, change power to any % between 1-100 and thats it. 50% setting using 12V gives 6 V net. Handy if you need 10 or 11V but your power supply is locked in at 12V or 13.8V.

 

I would definatly be interest in a few of these, is there a rough idea of price.

Edited by Davnic74

Regard's

David

 

Team Phoenix

 

4 x Australian National Champion.

 

Premier Raceway Build

Gallery Raceway Build.

Heany Park Raceway Build

 

 

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Wireless would be the ducks guts. But... Again with that evil little thing called a budget. Does it come with a free set of Ginsu steak knives? No, wireless is a fantabulous idea, I've already come across difficulties due to the length (or lack there of) of the PM leeds, about half the length of the Scaley ones.

 

I figure your wireless 'module' is/will be the "standard" 3pin with round earth configuration?

 

My dreams of building the driver's stations as a 'standard' setup were shattered on Thursday when I walked into AWM and discovered that the 3 pin round earth flush mount wall socket was going to cost me $38. :aussie: Each! :) Even had the guy behind the counter going through all the suppliers books trying to find a cheaper variant. Could've got down to $25, but it was still a no go. I didn't bother to ask what price for the plug.

 

So we traipsed around to our friendly AutoPro and had a chat to our mate Johnny (who was somewhat intrigued by the idea and may turn up for a looky sometime). Had been considering using trailer plugs, but instead we finished up with a neat little rectangular jobby that's small, robust and even the drunkest knob can't plug in backwards. Even with these cheaper plug/socket combo all the bits and pieces (wire, plugs, sockets, fuses & holders, switches, spade connectors, etc) finished up costing $70. :D As much as a darned controller. Ah well. All's good now. Plan at some stage to make adapters from round earth to square and vice versa, to allow for travels and visitors. Probably a waste of time and money currently, but we all have to dream.

 

Must remember to ask my tame sparky sometime if he can get me a better price on those round earth sockets.

 

(Warning: OFF TOPIC wanderings) Anyway, while I was working on track scenery yesterday HL rushed off to drop his car off to the exhaust doctor. Expecting him to be walking home, I was happily zoned out with paint brush in hand. Turned around with typical quip ready when door opened behind me, and was somewhat silenced when it wasn't HL that walked in. Yup, HL had brought the exhaust man home for a look at the track. Seems someone else had mentioned the project to him and he jumped at the opportunity to give HL a lift home (3 blocks) so he could have a look at what we were up to. Couldn't give him a squirt around the track, but I've a suspicion he's be back.


Computers. They'll never catch on.

 

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Tiny Tyers Targa - The build saga continues - Aging wood - A recipe for staining wood - Don't take a fence - Step by step paling fence - An old shed for my new cars - Wooden garage under construction

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I use Clipsal surface mount sockets 412L or 413L they are still about $15.00 each wholesale But much cheaper than wall mount outlets. See if there is a Rexel outlet anywhere near as they will usually sell over the counter. These are round earth sockets. I think the 413L is the best as it can be wired from the back.


Phil

 

Hobart Miniature Car Club

 

Tassie Resins

 

Email

 

 

 

 

 

 

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