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ZackM

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ZackM last won the day on April 9

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About ZackM

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  1. You mean like this ??.....................Sloting plus axle tubes/bushings....been around for 10yr +....they come in three widths, don't leave home without em !! This is definitely the way to go. The only reason my car didn't have one is I couldn't get it in time to ship my car. I got a good stockpile of them now! That said, I didn't notice a big improvement with the wire modifications. Zack
  2. One of my recent lockdown completions. The car had the windows super glued in poorly when I got it. So I broke them when removing them to clean up the car. Knowing I wanted to build this to be a racer I ended up making some new windows out of .005" clear styrene. They aren't perfect, but do the job just fine. I also installed a lexan interior, Piranha motor, sloting plus axles, CB designs 15x8 front and 15x11 rear wheels, NSR F1 rear supergrips, blocked up the front axle, and added some lead. The wheel inserts are Slot.it porsche 956. As I thought they were the closest I could easily get to the stock wheels. Its a great runner now and looks nice flying around the track!
  3. Here is what I have done to my NSR Merc. It is currently right up near the front of the US GT3 proxy, at or near track record pace on most of the tracks. I think it is the top NSR in the field, with some of the Scaleauto vettes leading the way. I understand the surfaces can be quite different down there, so I won't say this is going to help you. But there are some things to try. While I think some flex is a good thing, I did find the front of the Merc to be a little too soft. I glued down some .047" piano wire starting front right behind the front axle blocks leading down to about halfway in the pod. This helped a lot with handling, and some of the 3-wheeling the car was prone to for me. I have oillites glued into the pod. IMO, when you get the tires working really well most pods are too flexible in the back. The Sloting plus bushing/tube combos are great, but I was out of time to get one for this build. I laid some .055" wire across the top of the bushing holders, and then glued them in place using the motor for a brace on the front one. Gluing the motor in is a MUST. Wheels and tires on my car are kit standard, just trued and de-grained with lighter fluid one time. I made sure to keep the left/right balance of the car in tact, and only added enough ballast to really lean on the car. I am using a lightweight interior however, so you may need more with a stock one. The car is 83g. At the end of the day...the Mosler if tuned well will probably still be faster. Its just the right shape and weight balance.
  4. Well the mold lines were in some difficult spots to get fixed up, and the body had a lot more flashing present than you would get on a normal Tree'd styrene shell. It also has a couple low spots that some may want to spend time to fill, but I didnt' worry about it in this case. The wheels are CB Designs classic steel wheels in 15x10. Custom painted of course. The tires are Paul Gage PGT Part # 22166ff! They come with a Road race style center tread. But I cut them down until that is just gone, to give them more of the dirt track look and to allow the car to be a bit lower! Zack
  5. I finished up the car this weekend. Pretty happy with the final results. As usually the interior is tricky when the ride height gets this low, but I was able to make something work that looks pretty good. The roll bar was taken from a Pioneer Camaro, The dashboard is the one that came in the kit. The paint finish on the car isn't the best I have done, but considering the work I had to put into it to get it paintable I am happy with the results!
  6. Word on the street is he has some other hard to find bodies in the works.... Zack
  7. Yea these are the wheels and tires. Yeah the body was $23.50 shipped USD. Not cheap for how much work I had to put in on it, but for a unique body its a pretty good option! I think they were made to fit the pioneer chassis? Anyhow. Got the body mostly assembled after clear last night. Tonight I should be mounting it up and working on some interior details and such. Yellow wouldn't be choice again, but it looks pretty cool! Zack
  8. Hey guys! I have been plugging away on a few projects at home. I got a guy who wanted a sportsman style car like the Fairlane I just build. He wanted something different, and found this 70' Mercury Cyclone body on ebay. It is a custom made job, and for a home built styrene kit it was pretty well done. That said, it still required a lot of work to get it to the point where it could be painted. It is however pretty lightweight, so should be worth the effort! Yellow paint went down last night per request! Chassis is a simple flexi pan setup. Using a .063" Center pan and .032" side pans. The motor mount is a cut down professor motor lightweight unit. Should have her finished up and running by the weekend I hope! Zack
  9. Hi Mark, The motor bracket that Zack used (Professor Mtr.) is a copy of the brackets he used to sell that were from BWA. (BWA closed up, Andy had his own made). While they are a well made/ good looking bracket, they are rather heavy, and for the type of racing most folks here do, there are better choices. Both JK and RGEO make a range of brackets in various widths/offsets, that all have hole patterns drilled for 3/16 x 3/32 bushings, and hole patterns drilled for our 130/180 etc. type motors. Both of these manufacturers produce a range of high end commercial grade slot products and are very well respected. (I am sure you are familiar with both) While much lighter than the Prof. Mtr. bracket, both are designed for commercial racing, and are more than strong enough (way more) for any home/club racing. Cheers Chris Walker PS If you have any issues finding them , please let me know. Chris is correct, and I stated it in my other thread as well. This bracket is pretty overbuilt for a 1/32 or even a lighter 1/24 car. I sand a good amount off the top to shave some weight. I have burned through most of my stash of these at this point, so I will be going back to the JK brackets. Zack
  10. The Fairlane build it all wrapped up. I am happy with how it turned out Zack
  11. This is the part # for the motor bracket.....PMTR5012 I made some progress last night on the car. I painted the wheels, trued and glued the tires, and started getting the body mounts made up. I am not sure I am happy with the mounts themselves, but I like the stance of the car. I also shaved the door handles, and began work on the front end. Including a simple little Styrene spoiler. Zack
  12. I am working on a Monogram Ford Fairlane body. The intent is to send it in to the HRW Showdown series oval race. Since I couldn't justify spending the money and time for a car I won't get to oval race myself, I decided to compromise. I put together a "rattle" or "slider" chassis for it using the following components. -Professor Motor forged motor bracket, with material removed from up high. -Professor motor Oillie 3/16x3/32 bushings -.063" Brass front pan -1/8" OD front axle tube to accept a 3/32 axle -.055" Piano wire main rails -.055" Piano wire front axle reinforcement -3/32 sqaure tube axle connection on top of guide tongue. -Side pans are .031" brass, I wanted to keep them light so I could ballast them differently for road course and oval. -3/32 square tube slider tubes -.062" Piano wire Slide wires, with another small piece of .062" wire between the wire and pan connection. Weight is 40g. Probably far too heavy to put up a good fight on the oval. But should get around the road course well. The total movement of the center section of the chassis is around .080", the idea being that on the oval the weight will be offset toward the inside of the turn. These types of chassis are surprisingly good in 1/24, all I did was scale it down! Next up I will be hacking up the body to fit the big tires and smoothing some things out for a paint job! Thanks for checking it out! Zack
  13. I am working on a Monogram Ford Fairlane body. The intent is to send it in to the HRW Showdown series oval race. Since I couldn't justify spending the money and time for a car I won't get to oval race myself, I decided to compromise. I put together a "rattle" or "slider" chassis for it using the following components. -Professor Motor forged motor bracket, with material removed from up high. -Professor motor Oillie 3/16x3/32 bushings -.063" Brass front pan -1/8" OD front axle tube to accept a 3/32 axle -.055" Piano wire main rails -.055" Piano wire front axle reinforcement -3/32 sqaure tube axle connection on top of guide tongue. -Side pans are .031" brass, I wanted to keep them light so I could ballast them differently for road course and oval. -3/32 square tube slider tubes -.062" Piano wire Slide wires, with another small piece of .062" wire between the wire and pan connection. Weight is 40g. Probably far too heavy to put up a good fight on the oval. But should get around the road course well. The total movement of the center section of the chassis is around .080", the idea being that on the oval the weight will be offset toward the inside of the turn. These types of chassis are surprisingly good in 1/24, all I did was scale it down! Next up I will be hacking up the body to fit the big tires and smoothing some things out for a paint job! Thanks for checking it out! Zack
  14. ZackM

    Lola T290 Build

    I realize I made a mistake, this is Lola T290.....but I don't know how to edit the title. Zack
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