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rosco01

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Posts posted by rosco01


  1. I bedded the motor in yesterday on the bench, Phil..... bit concerned it would be too small for this model.... 

    On first start up - it took 1.5v to turn the rear axle... after three hours of bedding it in... it now only takes 0.5v before the axle will turn.. and it does this without hesitation in running....

    These motors might just be ok - won't know until I get the model on the track - progress report on my A9-X thread coming later today..... looking very good as a fine performer at this point in time... 

    And yes, I have a "slab" of those motors... bought them when I began to scratch build for the Tasman Proxy series.... small, but very pleased with the power output to weight...... 

    frats,

    Rosco


  2. Ok, thanks Vinno - my previous comments and pix on Vinno's review of this model have been moved to this thread, so - we'll go on from here.

    Spent yesterday morning picking out the first two of four "Marlboro" decals .... these are the large ones which go on the sides.. yet to do the mid one for the front and small one for the rear.

     

    001-decal-trimming-mail.jpg

     

    I'm off to my LHS shortly to pick up some MicroSol and MicroSet to apply them... and some clear coat.

     

    In the afternoon, I removed the rear axle assembly and fitted it up to the tyre/wheel truer.... 

     

    This is what I started out with, the wheels were pretty good ex factory - but of course were out a bit.... 

     

    03-rear-wheels-on-truer-mail.jpg

     

    And took them down on each of the three tyre faces until they were true....

     

    04-wheels-trued-mail.jpg

     

    I painted some water based adhesive to both the wheels and tyres then fitted them..... and bedded them in by running the assembly over the set up board to spread and balance out the glue whilst it was still wet.... I'll refit the axle to the truer today and true up the tyres.

    For now, I'm going to run this model using the factory motor, axle, wheels and tyres... 

     

    However, whilst I had the rear axle out - I popped out the motor and trial fitted the Flat 6R.... 

     

    01-Flat-6-R-motor-mail.jpg

     

    There's plenty of room for it under the interior - but there will have to be some chomping away at both the centre beam and also the very heavy and chunky seat bases... 

     

    02-interior-for-Flat-6-trim-mail.jpg

     

    By comparison - the differences between the factory and Flat 6R motor....

    Factory = length (can) - 27.0mm, width - 15.5mm, height - 11.9mm, weight - 17.8g (with nylon pinion).

    Slot it Flat 6R = length (can) 32.5mm, width - 20.5mm, height - 13.0mm, weight - 31.3g (no pinion).

     

    This Flat 6R motor will be fitted to the current LJ XU-1 project... it may very well be a bit "hot" for the model... and I may very well have to choose a less powerful alternative... 

    If this is the case, I will probably likewise do so for this A9-X... but until I finish the LJ - I won't be making any changes to the factory motor or driveline in this model.... 

     

    frats,

    Rosco

     


  3. Ok folk,

    I've been swamping (overtaking) Vinno's review thread on this model, and believe I should honor his review by starting one of my own - on my modifications to one of my two PB A9-X's.

    With permission (moderators) - I'll copy/paste a bit of what I put up in Vinno's thread... and continue on here as from today... 

    I am also having issues with accessing PostImage... it won't let me log in, I have put quite a bit up at that hosting site... maybe there is a limit. I got away from Photobucket because it wanted money... and may yet have to find another host if this is the case here... so, no pix with this.

     

    Back soon, with an update - lots to tell... for Scalextric, this model is the best overall finish and set-up I have seen from them for many years.... well done.... although, a few things could easily be fixed to make it a much better model again - like that blasted front bumper bar... and the tiny motor fitted, when there is plenty of room for a sidewinder flat can...... or just a larger in-line motor.

    The prototype for this model was a rocket - surely, it is fitting to have performance to match..... 

     

    frats,

    Rosco


  4. Paul,

    others here have the same plate as mine - I know of one chap who has only used it once, and now uses a piece of MDF for simplicity....

    I also have a "jeweller's tile"... ceramic and full of little holes you can poke a small brad into to keep axles etc in place - I built my first two Cooper scratch-builds on that.

    However, I never see to have to justify any exhorbitant expense when it comes to hobbies.... and this Precision Scale Slot one caught my eye pretty quickly.. 

    My first construction on it is the LC and LJ scratch builds.... I have a thread in this forum (if you have 6 months to read it)... so far, it has more than done what I wanted it to.

    But - you will find this to be a very, very expensive outlay for the amount of time you'll probably sit at it ..... and a number of less expensive options are available..

     

    For me, I'm more than happy with the outlay - being able to solder on it and keep everything in place - plus use it as a set-up plate... well, think you get the picture... 

     

    I am yet to use the wire bender - but believe that will come into it own when I go to bend piano wire to the exact shape.... pliers and a small vice are great, but can not possibly give the control of being able to pull around a dowel to a marked angle when released........ much easier than bending and measuring angles in and out of a vice... 

    Just as an aside - I have been messing around inside the chassis of the A9-X.... with a Flat 6R motor.. it will fit, but there's going to be a fair bit of "making room" for it.

    I'll post up some specs and pix .... don't know what's going on with PostImage at the moment - I can't get in.. and my pix in this thread have all disappeared... hope it's just a case of the site being down at present - I got away from another imaging host because it wanted money, and locked away everything I had put up for years.... hope this is not the case with PostImage.... grrrrrr

    frats,

    Rosco


  5. Hi Paul,

    I bought it from the US - terribly expensive... when I find the details, I'll add them here.

    Chap was excellent to deal with, when he found out what the shipping and exchange rates ended up costing me - he threw in a few extra bits.

    The plate is very heavy ceramic - so that you can solder away to your heart's contents.... might scorch it, but shouldn't damage it.... and, being ceramic - won't suck the living daylights out of your soldering iron absorbing heat from the metal... 

    He suggested I get the wire bender as well - which I did.... and I also ordered a fair few extra stainless pins.... from experience, finding rod or pins to nicely fit into factory made accessories like this is very difficult - ok if you only want to be "close" - but I like things to fit as the designer intended.... removes a lot of the "moving" issues we have when soldering.

    I also ordered the wheel chocks (set up blocks)... they allow the chassis to be positioned at the height of the tyres.. or wheels, whichever way you choose to assemble your model.

    frats,

    Rosco


  6. Ok, thought I'd get this done before I get lost outside in the garage and forget...

    Just took a handful of pix - pretty much should cover all of this...

    First up - the factory positioning of the bumper....

     

    01-factory-bumper-mail.jpg

     

    And my modified positioning... some might believe that it's actually now pointing downwards - but if you look at the rear of the model - you'll also see that it optically seems to be doing the same at the back end.... 

     

    02-modified-bumper-mail.jpg

     

    Here is my #2 car - the chassis and body as mounted at the factory - I will not mess with this car, other than decals and that blasted front  bumper...

    03-factory-chassis-ext-mail.jpg

     

    Here is what I ended up with so far with #1 car.... magnet gone, DPR socket and panel gone, chassis trimmed for body float.... 

     

    04-modified-chassis-ext-mail.jpg

     

    This is where I have got to so far with the interior hacking - with the body mounted on the chassis, only looking down through the windows to the floor reveals anything missing... 

    But the hack has made a big difference to overall weight of the car...

     

    05-modified-interior-mail.jpg

     

    And here we have my "modified" chassis - DRP socket and leads gone... everything shortened and trimmed to length.. 

     

    06-modified-chassis-int-mail.jpg

     

    And here it is as it comes out of the factory - oil still present in this model.. but I did wipe away a pool of it under the crown - obviously, the running of the driveline was tested at the factory - I doubt that I'll ever run this model... even as a comparison to #1.

     

    07-factory-chassis-int-mail.jpg

     

    And - as stated - Scalextric got the chassis of this one right - both my models sit perfectly flat on the set up plate... you can see in this pic that all four wheels sit nicely on the plate.... I am yet to true the wheels, then glue the tyres and true those up ..... along with setting the bushes in the chassis - I'm really hoping this model will be ever so much better than the L-34 has been.... 

     

    08-set-up-plate-wheels-mail.jpg

     

    Hope that just about covers it.... decals to come yet too - that will make a great difference to the look of the model... and I have to do something about PB - the driver in this model is nothing like him... probably closer to Jim Richards - which may very well have been the subject...

     

    frats,

    Rosco

     

     

     

     

    • Like 1

  7. Sure, Shaynus... give me a couple of hours.... I'll show one of the "collector" version, which I won't touch - and one that I've had a "fiddle" with.... 

    I'd have liked a cross-axle mounted motor - and a motor with a bit more bulk to it than what Scalextric fitted.. it's a long can slim line motor - with a very long shaft to the crown.... currently in my "plan" box.... I'd like to fit a Flat 6 to it with a Slot-It rear axle assembly.... I'll do a bit of work and let you know.

     

    There must be a "glut of oil at Scalextric - I have soaked up and wiped out a gallon of light oil from the chassis... even a pool of it under the motor and magnet... 

    There is a lot of tightening up of axle bushes and guide pin to do yet.... the axles are coated in a gloss black - I don't yet know if they are steel or aluminium... they run in loosely fitted nylon bushes at rear... and simply push through holes in the chassis at the front.

    What is good about this Scalextric model - is that the alignment and mesh of the driveline is very good... as opposed to my L-34 when I got it... this model runs freely along a set up plate quite happily... I don't believe I'll have to "re-learn" the plastic chassis in this one - all four wheels seem to sit on the set up plate quite well.

    There is very little clearance from the rear tyres to the body... I have chopped away some of the chassis to create body float... and may have to fit a very thin washer just to ensure that the top of the rear tyres does not foul the body wheel arch flares... no evidence of it yet.. but it must be close.. 

    There isn't any dash instrument detail.. just a black dash..... the interior is all a "buff" brown/beige color.... grinding into it reveals a black plastic - so, it's been painted that colour.

    I'm not sure yet how much "interior" was necessary in the "series production" rules at the time.. I may very well be allowed to hack further into the interior... 

    I have an almost finished model which almost balances equally on both axles... am yet to run it on a track and see how it runs - but I believe it will be a heck of a lot better than the L-34 -which I was very disappointed with - befitting the proto-type.... I am hoping for something exiting with the A9-X - if it follow the same parallel.... 

    I have reduced a lot of weight out of the "running" model.... all up - I'm down to 76.9g..... I removed and re-wired the DPR parts and lid as well, and have simple connections from the pick up to the motor, then from the motor to both the LED boards front and rear.... It's a no-brainer to do this mod, if you aren't going digital..... the green lead from the pick up becomes the red positive input to the motor... the yellow lead becomes the black negative one.... the onboard "socket" simply bridges the yellow to black, and green to red.... 

    Obviously, with a digital card.... the yellow and green are supply - the red, positive to the motor and LED's and the black likewise negative..... with a bit of electronic wizardry for the chip to tell the leads what to do.... and signal back down the line to the controller... 

     

    At this point in time, I have no intention of going digital.. I have a number of cars which can - and one which has the chip in it if I ever want to go visit a digital track... 

     

    Ok... back later with some pix...

     

    frats,

    Rosco

     


  8. Yes, Shaynus - apparently all of these A9-X's are the same... I note Armchair have stock of another livery version - just about guaranteed that the bumper is aimed at koala's on that one too... 

    My guess is that it's a tooling issue - the bumper tang slots are more than likely set at the same angle as the headlight shrouds... and the bumper presses in at that angle - and not horizontal.. that's my guess.

     

    Will post up a report on fixing the second A9-X - but only it, and the Marlboro decals are going to be done on that one - it will be kept as a collector's item.... this current one will "race"... doing lots of work on it at present... Not in love with the long shafted tiny motor in it - I'm looking at fitting a Flat 6... can't have the LJ going harder than an A9-X - can I?

     

    frats,

    Rosco


  9. Ok folk,

    Bumper job done... plus grinding/cajoling out the lower radiator intake.... 

    Front - 

    008-bumper-fitted-front-mail.jpg

     

    Top - 

    010-bumper-fitted-top-mail.jpg

     

    Side -

    009-bumper-fitted-side-mail.jpg

     

    I believe I have got location, placement and angle pretty close - with the "rib" of the channel in the bumper running parallel to the skirt of the body, and the amount of set-out from the front just enough to be able to see the very feintest of gap between the body and the rear of the bumper...

     

    I have now to trim Patto's water-slide Marlboro decals then a final light clear coat to finish the body... 

     

    With #2 A9-X - my intention now is to simply "slice" away at the bumper mount from underneath.... again, my preferred method is to use a fine pointed very sharp scalpel blade and draw it backwards along the cut - having first made a very careful "forward" cut to mark the line.... 

    I'll keep gouging this out with the blade until the bumper can be angled level... then cement it in place.

     

    I am using a new-to-me cyano - which is working a treat on plastics.... 

    "Tarzan's GRIP ShockProof Super Glue...."rubber toughened".... it seems to be able to get a hold of differing plastics that I have always had trouble with.

    Further - although the title suggests it's flexible - it really doesn't seem so - but I have not broken anything off by knocking it yet.... it might just be a winner for our slot car application.

    Bought mine from the Big Red Hammer store - bit exxy.. but........ if it works.......

     

    frats,

    Rosco

    • Like 1

  10. Ok...... more done - bumper mount inserts fitted and lower radiator intake filed out.

    Just whilst I have the mic - I have the body apart, the interior weigh a massive 11.79g and the body without it but with glazing - 22.6g - the overall body weight increases by over another 50% when the interior is added... I'll be "trimming some fat" from mine..... not happy with PB either - does anyone make a head for PB? I can fashion a helmet for the era to fit.

     

    Pix...

     

    006-bumper-mounts-fitted-mail.jpg

     

    I filled in my little oopsie and painted the filler white....... also painted the top of the styrene mount blocks black so that they will not be seen when the bumper is fitted.

     

    Internal - painted the area black to conceal my work..

     

    007-bumper-mounts-internal-mail.jpg

     

     

    frats,

    Rosco


  11. Hi folk,

    hope I'm not stealing OP's thread?.... 

    My two A9-X's arrived yesterday - by golly, that bumper was the first thing I saw...even before I opened the box.

    Having two, and with the decision to attack one and tune it - I decided the first blow would be to the bumper. By golly, is that sucker a mongrel to get out.

    I started with a Dremel and a fine engraving bit - taking away the "meat" of the bumper mount from inside. Word of warning!.... be very, very careful around the top of the mount - it didn't take much to creep into the headlight surround - I have a little bit of repair work to do in there, but it's nothing concerning - a pin head dab of putty and some black acrylic will all but repair it.

     

    After some 20 minutes, taking away what I believed should have been the cemented posts into the body - it wouldn't budge... and I wasn't game enough to go any deeper.

    So, grabbed the finest and sharpest scalpel blade I could must and started to "backwards" scrape between the body and the bumper - which eventually brought success.

     

    I filed out the aperture in the body to a rectangle shape - then make up some laminated styrene card blocks to fill the holes.

     

    So, here we have the bumper removed with the two apertures filed out (excuse rough fibres)..

     

    001-front-mail.jpg

     

    002-inner-front-mail.jpg

     

     

    Next up, filed back the mounts on the bumper to square in line.. then will mount the blocks to them.... insert them in the apertures - and cement them in place... 

    This is what the bumper mount shape is.... after grinding away what is inside the aperture. 

     

    003-bumper-mount-mail.jpg

     

    I still don' t know why the bumper was fitted inclined - there does not appear to be any reason for it - maybe the post was molded at an angle - I don't know ... I ground all of mine off in the process of getting the bumper out.

     

    And this is the slot I ended up with.... 

     

    004-bumper-slot-mail.jpg

     

    Outside....

     

    005-bumper-slot-mail.jpg

     

    I will post some more up after re-fitting the bumper in place - I am undecided whether I'll grind out the lower radiator aperture under the bumper... I'm not a great fan of "faux" openings... this one shouldn't be too hard to do... not touching the grille.

     

    And - take a bow, Scalextric - those windscreen wipers .... by golly, why oh why didn't you fit something similar to the Falcon GTHO series - those wipers are atrocious... perhaps they were listening here, folk...?

     

    frats,

    Rosco

     


  12. Thanks M P - I could easily be tempted to purchase any second version of this model.... 

    If so, then I will keep one of the A9-X's as a collector's item.. and work the second one up to be a strong performer... the A9-X was indeed a weapon in its day... everything that the L-34 proved not to be...

    Thanks for the welcome back - so many things to do, so few years left.... 

     

    frats,

    Rosco


  13. Almost forgot about the press jig, Shaynus..... nice to know there are members here who have a better memory than I. 

    I'll have to go look for it... I'm sure I've put it away in a "safe place".... when I find that place - I'm sure I'll find a lot of other hidden "things" as well.... 

    Two cars coming this week, and Patto's decals - so, it will give me drive to open Pandora's box... and more than certainly some "inspiration"... 

     

    The press idea works famously, but there's a lot of work in making up the two matching jig pieces.

    Drilling the holes in the blank is an exacting process - get that right, and I believe the assembly will match any commercially available alternative - plus, you can literally make up any design requirement...... and not rely on what is available then be forced to conform to it....... wheels, as I have experienced are even more demanding - give almost limitless option to need...

    As stated above, instead of finding tyres to match wheels - I can now make wheels to match tyres... the Escort/Cortina tyres I have ordered (MJK 4272) - I believe will be a lot closer match for the LC/LJ XU-1's than those I had ordered. The tricky bit is to make up wheels which will allow the magnificent Munter inserts to fit..... end result should be very pleasing if successful.

    In my mind, I can see PB's LJ XU-1 materialising.. Patto's decals will do ever so much to bring this model to life.... along with my little applications of body detail.

    My fear, is that Scalextric will climb on board once this model is finished - which I also believe will attract considerable interest from "downunder"..... and mass produce their own.... limited run or not ...

    The importance of Brock's LJ XU-1 - is that it was his first "Bathurst" win.... the first of 9.... I will stop at the A9-X. don't really have great interest in what came after that.... "my" period was mid 60's to late '70's... an exciting an developmental era for what evolved from the simple harsh "road" conditions of Mt. Panorama - to the "raceway" it became.... prior to the "Chase".... 

     

    I believe most of us modelers have a "theme"... for my Australian theme - I model 60's and 70's.... a very impressionistic era in my growing youth and early adulthood...

     

    frats,

    Rosco

    • Like 1

  14. Bump... we're back. 4 months up north in Qld escaping the winter and troubling virus down here in Vic.. timing was perfect.

     

    Ok.... we probably need to pick up a bit from where we left off.

    I have now ordered some different tyres - I was not in love with the wide tyres in these builds, and have ordered two sets for the 13" Cortina.... I will make up wheels to suit both the Munter inserts and these tyres... now that I believe I can achieve this

    My lathe is still in bits - having left the job when we made our dashed escape out of this state back in June.. so, I'll need to fit those tapered roller bearings to that and set it up before we can get to any wheel turning... 

     

    I have chased up decal sets for both the LC and LJ XU-1's of PB... and they should arrive in the coming week - thanks Patto - really looking forward to getting an optic on these.

    Patto suggested I have the red deleted from printing - as I have chosen to do.... this will allow me to airbrush the LJ in white then mask up and spray the red.... the decals will finish this model off beautifully.... I hope.

    As for the LC - I will have to do quite a bit of research into this "kit bash" model... I know what I want - and it will be the HDT version of the LC... at this stage.

     

    Further, I have now ordered two of PB's A9-X Torana's.... I will change the livery of the second one to bring it in line with successive years that PB ran these cars.

     

    My Allan Moffat 1969 XW GTHO arrived... what where Scalextric thinking?... those wipers!.... have to go.... I have the three set now of '69, '70 and '71 of these great period winners... but, the wipers on all three will have to be made up and the "tree branches" removed... 

     

    So folk - we're back... and I will have to get a footing on where I was before we left..... lots of work around the house, cleaning up the van and truck yet before I can commit to serious modeling - but, we're back on deck and I am very keen to return to modeling...

     

    frats,

    Rosco

    • Like 1
    • Upvote 1

  15. Thanks Mark,

    I now appreciate that you have considerable modeling skills, and now further suggest that you attempt a piano wire and brass chassis.. there are/have been some amazing chassis build around the world.... you'll find these in the scratchbuilder's section... detail in some of them is simply exquisite.. and they darned well go fast to boot!

     

    Of course, you will get better traction and braking with wider tyres ... but it's a job lot.

    One thing which many people don't appreciate, is that the outer "corner" of the rear tyres must be "radiused"... having an edge on the tyre makes the model prone to tipping when pressed into corners... getting the right radius for the model is as important as getting weight positioned correctly.... too much radius, and it will slide out too easily - not enough, and it will roll over before letting go... 

     

    I simply don't know what it is with the L-34 Scalextric Torana... the motor is in-line, rather than my preferred side-winder config. But, the little Coopers I built are also in line, and they go very well for the tiny motor it is limited to run with... 
    I am not messing with the L-34.... but, I may very well build a chassis that can be swapped over with the factory one for competition purposes... in an "open" class.... 
    It simply doesn't make scale sense that the L-34 should be a slower car than the LC or LJ... the A9-X, which is backordered and we are all waiting with baited breath for it's release - was an excellent prototype racing car... winning Bathurst.... against the Ford Coupes... there is no reason that the L-34 should not be a fast car in scale.. other than the engineering Scalextric put into it... I believe I can manufacture a chassis which will very much improve perfomance of this model... but, competition wise - it cannot be raced within the guidelines of class competition in our hobby and at club events... 

     

    You will pick up an awful lot on this tuning as you progress.

    Probably one of the best methods to improve OOB models that I have purchased of late with a plastic chassis - is to completely strip them down to bare plastic, and to "reset" the plastic memory.. I have done this to many models now, and there is a considerable improvement in performance... even some of my Slot-It GT40's have revealed an out of "true" chassis.... 

    The method to do this, I have posted a while back.... involving a "bath" of boiling water poured gently over the chassis, and then insulating it so that it cools very slowly over a long period of time... this resets the memory of the plastic

    I mount the chassis on a true metal plate, hold it down with small magnets so that it is absolutely flat on the plate - then slowly pour boiling water over it until it is covered.. plus more so that the greater volume of water in the bath cools out a lot slower... 

    This method produces an almost perfect flat chassis..... which allows it to "flex" under strain, yet returns to it's flat state on release... 

     

    Truing the tyres and removing all backlash between gear and pinion, plus any gap between the wheels and axle bushes also makes for a much quicker model... we use "shims" for this... with thicknesses down to 0.2 mm...... getting a good mesh with very little backlash and no pre-load is the aim.... arranging the mesh by this method of using shims on the axle/bush area provides much greater control of it..... using the "guide slot" of the crown on the end of the pinon shaft of the motor is a very much outdated method... from early Scalextric days... it causes drag and the mesh is not constant.... you can shim the mesh to the point of virtually having no backlash, and no pre-load.... the gears of both pinion and crown will last for eons... I find using a grey lead pencil on the teeth of the pinion to be an excellent method of lubrication.. it really doesn't need much... but graphite, in this form will provide many hundreds of hours of operation without need of further lubrication... and - it does not attract grit.. which every other form of lubrication does - if it's "wet" ... it will attract and add into solution the grit... 

    I learned this little trick from my r/c helicopter days... the ball joints of the rotor and head connections... 

    Removing moulding lines is another great way to improve performance... but, with Slot It - their quality is so good, you won't need to do much - if indeed anything at all.. the Scalextric stuff really needs a good looking at.

     

    We are moving from a "toy" racing car set .... which Scalextric have built a wonderful history on.... to a hobbyist/sport domain... Scalextric can be "tuned" for much improved performance.. but, with clubs - there are limits on just how far you can take a model before it no longer conforms to rule.... best check with a club before getting serious about bringing any "purchased" model up to a performance level... 

     

    Brakes - we have come a very long way in the past 10 years... our controllers now will "effect" a brake which can be so advanced that braking can be left to limits previously not attempted...without de-slotting or worse.

    I do not understand the physics of how the controller does this, and I am under the impression that it does not "throw the reverser"... that is, apply power in reverse... well, not directly anyway.

    We have electronic whizzes in here that perhaps can explain modern braking by electronic control... 

    My initial attempts (before I learned of these modern controllers) was simply to run an extra lead across the controller resistance winding... so that, when the throttle was released completely - it bridged both rails of the track... effectively destroying emf... this worked well to an extent... the larger motors being more responsive. 

    But, compared to the braking ability of electronic controllers - my very much neanderthal method is so far behind that i discarded the entire method and simply purchased two Slot-It SCP-2 controllers.....if you are yet to look into this... they will very quickly expand your current (excuse pun) method if, if you are using a resistance wire controller... the available options and parameters are such, that I have to write down the settings under the box of every model... it really makes such a difference - not limited to just on/off for functions, but the ability to set very fine parameters for each... and - they are convertible (with a different plug pack) to the modern digital system... which I have not engaged into.

     

    Ok Mark... hope this brings a little more enlightenment to your return - be warned though - the number of models will begin to increase with a very parabolic rate of increase... 

    Some members here will tell you that they literally have "hundreds" of models... me, I suppose all up I have something around the 40 mark.. with two recent additions in the first GTHO of Allan Moffatt and the Hamilton Porsche 911 which Brock drove... Brock's A9-x is on backorder and I have procured one when they first arrive in the country... 

     

    Old Holdens... you might like to message "Munter" on the range of these that he offers as a kit.. his products are right up there.. I siimply love the Cooper and the LJ is also another great model... mine is going through a fair bit of scaling... but, for the most - anyone who cleans up any flash and produces a reasonable job in painting and detailing will enjoy a great looking scale model.... 

     

    Chat later,

     

    frats,

    Rosco

    • Like 1

  16. Hi Mark,

    just a little of my background history in slot cars.... with huge breaks in between.

    Fascinated in them when I was a kid and couldn't afford one, neither could my parents make a gift of one for me... so, I had to work and save.... piece by piece, part by part... 

    Eventually bought a transformer (Triang P2 - still have it, but don't use it)... and enough track to make a circuit.... two D straights, four 90 deg curves... 

    Until I had these, I put together the track pieces in every conceivable configuration... then, my neighbor bought an oval set with two AC Cobra cars... 

    I then went through a successive number of new cars.. about one every six months.... and amassed a (all Scalextric) Offenhauser rear wheel drive, Mini Cooper and Triumph TR-4A.... 

    None of them were competitive with my neighbor's Cobras.... and I wouldn't concede to purchase one... 

     

    All my cars became "ill"... needing work to keep them running. I started to learn how to repair them and what made them go ..... and what could be done to make them go faster.. this was when I was all of 13 years old (1968)... 

    My fascination with slot cars took its first huge break when I bought my first motor bike.... but, I kept everything... 

    From motor bike, to motor car... learning to drive, driver's license and "girls" were enough to keep my mind otherwise occupied from slot cars... 

    In 1980, my eldest son showed an interest in them... and out came the track. In the meantime, I had started work and on one visit to Hearns Hobbies in Melbourne, I purchased another two cars.... Ferrari P4 and Lamborghini Muira.... but they only saw the track a couple of times before going into storage themselves.

     

    When Alan Jones won the F1 crown - I bought the MRRC Williams... and my interest returned.... we bought some "dud" Scalextric cars - the Rally series Triumph TR-7 and Escort .... I was never happy with either of these cars, but the Williams was very fast... it had steering front wheels and was faster than any of my Scalextric cars... 

     

    We bought more track and ended up with enough to build a four lane figure 8 circuit.... my friends and family took a keen interest as to when I was going to have a "racing car" day... and we were never short of visitors... 

     

    My attention was drawn back into model aircraft (I have had nearly every hobby a boy can have)... and I finally broke into radio control... leaving slot cars behind again for another great mothballing... 

     

    It wasn't until my kids had left home, that I started to think of that AC Cobra.. and getting one of my own - it haunted me all these years.

    I looked on the internet for sourcing one, and the prices for the original Scalextric model almost frightened me away permanently... it really wasn't such a great model... but, I still wantedo one.. I most certainly wasn't going to pay over $200 for a car in "used" state.. and almost walked away for good... happy to leave my collection intact for use on whim... 

    I just happened to do a search on Cobra slot car... and a new world opened up to me.... I was not aware that the slot car hobby was still in full vogue... and the variety of manufacturers.... 

    I very quickly found a local supplier (Ged) and ordered two Carrera Cobras... then went out to pick them up. To say I was delighted with both these cars is an understatement - they were simply exquisite in detail and performed very well out of the box.. after changing the guide to a shallower one (supplied) for Scalextric track... 

    I began to collect more of these beautiful Carrera models... which have now amassed to around 10.... including Mark Webbers F1 and Daniel Riccardo's RB-7..... 

    Bump.... I joined a local slot car club (Phoenix), but could not make meetings... some practice sessions mid-week, but never an event.. weekends are always out for me with family... none of my hobbies are allowed to take any precedence on weekends... 

    Having joined Phoenix, I was linked to forums.... and this was probably the nucleus of my becoming very deeply involved with scratch building.

    I had scratch built model locomotives using styrene card (looks like plastic) and brass .... and also wagons and carriages, so I had a little bit of experience with detail and accuracy.. 

    I joined this forum and learned of the Tasman Cup proxy racing.... I was very keen to watch models being made.. and one of the members (Fading Embers) was posting regularly on her progress... I simply had to buy into this... 

    Many members of the forum and that proxy group were ever so helpful and encouraging.. and I finally produced my first model... a T-53 Cooper - the excellent body coming from Munter, the chassis being produced by myself... a very simply piano wire and brass construction.. the front and rear axle frames being supplied by a forum member... 

    It took me nearly three months for the first build - at no time, did I have a track to test it on.. and most of the set up was done on a slotted steel plate...

    I learned as I went, and learned what made a model go better... learning also, that "tuning" is not limited to the motor - but the model.... just so much to learn and understand.

    I first got the chance to run the model at Stubbo's holiday house in the south east of Vic... up until then, it had not run. Stubbo put it on the track and asked me if I wanted to "test" it... I told him "no".... and for him to find out how my build came to perform. He was very impressed with the lap speed of my efforts. Asked me a number of times about the motor - which I later checked and was very happy to learn was the lower powered version of the two that the English manufacturer produced.. it, I was told - was a fast car. and I entered it in my first ever "proxy" series..... it came in 4th overall in the series.. best placing was a second.... I was pretty chuffed.

     

    So, Mark... you have now learned from where I have come to this build... the Torries will be the third and fourth scratch built models I have produced... the second model is an unfinished Cooper T-53.. it stalled when we went interstate for one of our three month absences up north over winter, and failed to continue on return... it is still on the "books" and will be completed.

    If not for me finding one of these Torana's in a pic on this forum... I would probably be nearing the completion of the second T-53.... 

    I chased up the owner of said LJ XU-1 and again, found that Munter produced the "kit"... which is again, an excellent kit... 

    I'm not a lover of "generic" production chassis.... after building my first scratch built one, and gaining good results.... 

    I was never going to fit a production chassis to these models.. and have gone a bit further this time with the purchase of some additional items to build the chassis.

     

    The lathe and mill, another hobby I have always wanted to get into - came a few years back... I was a high school pupil, not a technical school one.... our subjects were limited to woodwork in a trade perspective.. this new metalwork hobby fascinated me.. and I have been further helped and guided by "Stu" ..... he has been exceptionally patient and forthcoming with guidance... my turning of wheels has thus far been the jewel in the crown of anything I have turned in the lathe, but its potential is way beyond such a relatively simply process... so too, the Mill - when I start to work that to a modest level of its potential... 

     

    My suggestion, Mark - is to consider scratch building a chassis...... it is not difficult, but demands some basic tools to make life easier... namely a jig of sorts to hold pieces in place whilst they are being soldered... a jeweller's soldering tile is an excellent place to start.

    You can literally design and produce an almost unlimited variation of chassis for the model bodies you quest... 

    There is a huge following, and number of members in this forum who will aid and guide you through the process.... of course, many will keep their "best" secrets to themselves, not wishing to divulge "that" edge in competition.. but, for the main - you'll get every piece of advice and suggestion you need to produce some very fine work.. and it will more than likely out-perform anything you can purchase off the shelf. and at a fraction of the price... parts excepted.

    Brass sheet and piano wire plus solder are very cheap... the componentry is what we all must bow to in cost.... but, as you work through each build - you'll more than likely amass a considerable stock of "parts"... 

    You would be well advised to continue with Slot-It componentry.. it all works, and is produced with an extremely high standard of accuracy ..... there are other manufacturers who produce equal if not better parts... but, as an entry level into this hobby/sport - you will not be disappointed with anything that comes from the Slot-It range... I have not.

    Wheels - hmmmmm..... courses for horses... I have developed a huge respect for wheel manufacturers since producing my own.... but, understand the basics..... 

    Most would consider finding a tyre to fit a wheel.... my application is the reverse... I am producing wheels to match the tyre that I can best fit my needs.... so far, I have more than two sets of perfect wheels for these two Torana's.. but, I am now firmly of the belief that I will not use them.... having found a more scale suitable tyre - and hence, my need now to produce 8 wheels to fit them onto.

    Currently, these MJK tyres are out of stock - but, when they come back in.. I will be ordering a few sets of them.. then set about designing and making wheels to match both the tyre, and the more than excellent inserts which come with this Munter kit.... they are exacting for the wheels used on the HDT LJ Torana... sadly, the LC XU1 ran steel wheels - and I need to either make or procur inserts to replicate those.... the tyre size will be identical.... 

    So, Mark - don't hold yourself back - don't put a time frame on this build... but more so - please consider attempting a scratch built chassis... very simple and basic... and if you keep within the specs - it will more than likely out-perform that of a production version....... you can build weight into such a scratch built chassis at certain locations that will result in some very stable and fast lap times.... don't be fooled into believing that wide tyres and diameter will produce a fast model... it's in the "tuning"... providing you use good quality tyres and "true" them down - you will get some very fast times out of a model with a narrow track..... just take our F1 models for example... they have narrower track than most of the saloon type cars - but their weight distribution and weighting height affords much of this.... the tyres allow for grip... which is something you really don't want up front, as best I have come to learn. 

    Getting the right amount of weight in the right spot will reduce your lap times... and as such, don't fret about not having anyone to race...... if you can get consistent times on a layout,  you can tweak and tune the model to improve it's lap times.... 

    Don't be fooled either, into believing a big motor will produce a fast car.... yes, it will be fast in a straight line... but some of the models I have with the most powerful motors - are not what I would call fast cars.... they become "twitchy"... trying to get any smooth and consistent (this is important) lap times out of a twitchy car on full 12v is demanding for the best of slot car racing enthusiasts.... a lesser powered model which has consistent times will usually win against one which is quick down straights, but is a nightmare to contain either going into or out of curves.... a cigarette paper thickness too far or less on the throttle trigger makes these twitchy cars very difficult to get smooth laps out of.... until you can get smooth ones, you are never going to get consistent ones.... and it's the consistent ones which will educate you into bringing the model up onto the "edge"..... where your fastest laps will begin to emerge.... just like the full size prototypes.... anyone can plant the foot and go down a straight with a huge motor and tyres with great grip...... let's just go back to where this topic came from.. the "giant killers"..... 3.3 litre 6 cylinder cars vs 5.8 litre V8's..... and these little pocket rockets won the larger variants over....... don't sell them short in our world of slot cars - produce a balanced chassis and they should be as competitive as the combatants they were up against in 1972.... 

    As for the L34 Scalextric Torana - sadly, that car is a slug... out of the box (OOB).... I have one, and it slips and slides all over the place... won't go, and won't stop... I'd love to build my own chassis for it, but I bought that model as a collector's item... I need some Marlboro decals to finish the livery.. and will more than likely approach Patto for those. I have MJK tyres to fit to it, and may just turn some aluminium wheels for it then use the supplied wheels as inserts....... currently thought in process on that.... how far do you go before it is no longer a collector's item...?

     

    Ok, Mark - this has probably given you more than enough to digest and think about... I would encourage you to consider scratch building a chassis - you will learn ever so much about the dynamics of what makes a model fast.... or slow.... and the satisfaction of creating something with your own hands and developing skills will bring much joy and pride to your ownership... 

     

    I might further suggest you read the Tasman proxy series thread... it is in there, that you will gain much understanding of the information you seek... guides, motors, gears etc. etc. etc.... 

    Big, fast turning motors and high gear ratios (high reduction) are not what your mind may perceive the to be.. they make a model as twitchy as all get-out... I built "Godzilla" (a Slot It GT40 white kit with a huge motor and heavily reduced gear ratio)... it is a monster to try and drive.... leaps off the track on anything more than a modest crest and peforms better (faster lap times) with voltage set down to around 9v... at 12v.... it is almost uncontrollable..... so - try a modest motor size to start with, and purchase a number of differing pinions and crowns to "tune" your model for controllability..... then start shifting weight around in it to achieve the fastest (smoothest edge) lap times.... 

     

    A good hand controller will help you greatly.... I have two Slot-it SCP-2 controllers... I find these excellent for adjusting curves and braking.... but, you must get the model right before you can make use of the numerous parameters that a modern electronic hand controller will enhance your skills and control....

     

    'nuff for now.... welcome aboard to the "dark art" of building - for me, it is the main focus of my return to the hobby.....

     

    frats,

    Rosco

    I also now have all three of Allan Moffatt's GTHO's.... and they likewise will stay as collector's models. The only thing I will change - is to scratch build some scale wipers for all four models..... the supplied ones are ridiculously over-scaled for durability - they look darned well ugly.... and the model would look better without them entirely... 


  17. Hi Shedbuilder - please post many pix of your progress. Mine has stalled, not due to lack of interest - but just a tad of distance between me and the project. I won't be able to do any further work until near the end of the year.... so, don't for one moment believe that my sudden lack of progress reports suggests it has terminated - it most certainly has not.

    So, in the "race" (excuse pun) to complete these builds - you will have quite a few laps up on me before I return to the track.... 

    I considered removing the bumpers, but the casting from John is so darned good, that all that is needed is to scribe and scrape faux clearance between them and the body - his casting is very, very good...... I have "tweaked" some of it to appease my own known prototype similarity - but for the most, the model is excellent for a bit of a clean-up and paint... 

     

    I have much work to do on it yet to bring it to my satisfaction - and yet to make a start on the chassis... turning the wheels has taken a lot of time and patience, and  I am now considering not using any of those already made... the width of them is not prototypical of what HDT were limited to run with.. I am looking at MJK tyres which were made for a Cortina at present.. I believe they will be a much closer size to prototype.. I can make wheels to fit them and also the magnificent inserts from John's kit... 

     

    frats,

    Rosco


  18. Can't help with fixing flat spots other than by re-sanding Gordo.

    But, with all my boxed models, I cut icy pole sticks up into short sections and glued them to the bottom of the box.

    They fit between the underside/chassis of the model and the box... surprisingly, it only takes one or two to lift the model up off its tyres just enough so that it is not resting on its tyres.

     

    I have two new sets of PG tyres which have been stored under a drawer out of "everything"...never touched. Sadly, they have gone "red" and have split in places... 
    I am a little disappointed in this... they will never be used and I am reluctant to purchase any more for upcoming models.

     

    I do not know if I have failed to do something to "mothball" PG tyres, or if this is simply the nature of the urethane beast...

     

    I have not suffered such with MJK or Scalextric tyres...

     

    frats,

    Rosco


  19. Ok folk,

    bit of an update to keep this thread alive.

    My scratchbuilder's jig and wire bender from Pro-Slot arrived yesterday - it will be a while now before I can make a start on the chassis - I will be "distancing" myself from this build for a bit of a spell and will report back in when I resume.

    This is where it's at... I started work on the great Munter body.

    First up - the original front door - I'm not in love with the quarter vent window and will remove it and make up a brass one - fitting it further to the rear,  just in front of the curve at the top - this is where I see it on the proto-type.

    I drilled and slit the three vents in the fender quarter - I believe vents should not be "faux" if there is opportunity to open them... 

    I have done quite a bit of work on door and window gaps.... original pic and revised... there is still work to be done in here to get some of the lines sharper - but I'm getting there.

     

    2001-front-left-orig-mail.jpg

     

    2002-primer-mail.jpg

     

    Next up, the rear - I don't like the spoiler that the model was cast from.. it is way too big, has too much rearward rake and does not have the lovely little upward curve - I spent quite some time modifying this and believe I'm very close.... I have also trenched out around the tail-lights, bumper, window and all panels........

    The body casting was very thin on the right rear corner - I broke through a few times and had to re-fill. The gaps will be filled almost flush with Aquadhere after I profile the lenses and the edge of the light surrounds will be brush painted in chrome - which I am yet to experiment with..... end result should be close to proto-type.....

    before/after pix

     

    2003-rear-orig-mail.jpg

     

    2004-rear-primer-mail.jpg

     

     

    And finally for this post - we come to the plenum vents in front of the window - there was some work in this.

    I used a #80 drill in a pin vice to drill out top and bottom of each vent then hand made a scalpel blade with a very thin body. I sharpened the cutting edge and ground flat the back of the blade.

    It took nearly two weeks of evenings, but all these slots are now open. I added some filler under the vents to create the plenum panel. Again, there is work to do to finish this off - but it is only touch up work. There were many break throughs and broken strips.... I believe the end effect will add some reality to the model.

     

     

    2005-plenum-orig-mail.jpg

     

     

    2006-plenum-mail.jpg

     

     

    I don't like the front grille - it has a Chev bowtie badge in it.. and will mean an awful lot of work to open the holes in it. I have decided to make my own grille from brass strip.. 

    The vents beneath the bumper can simply be ground out. I may re-inforce the rear of the bumper with a sort length of brass wire - I believe this will be necessary when the body casting material is removed from that area..... this model will have frontal collisions with barriers and other obstacles.. it will need a bit of beefing up at the front when I have done my work.

     

    Ok - so, that's it for a spell now... 

     

    frats,

    Rosco


  20. Ok folk, update.... my package from Michigan, US arrived today 23rd June.

    It arrived at Australia Post on 9th June.... it is AP which held the package up in my instance.

    I have my scratchbuilder's jig and also the wire bender, plus three sets of wheel blocks and also three different sized replacement pins.

    Pretty happy - just glad it got here.

    frats,

    Rosco

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