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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/30/2020 in Posts

  1. 7 points
    Hi all During last our last lockdown, which thankfully didn't last too long, I decided to purchase some 3D files. This is my first attempt at a mostly self made slotcar - one of my goals for my 3D printer. Body was printed on the smallest wall thickness. It lost a little detail but I plan to race this in our Aussie Touring Car class so not too bothered with how pretty it is. Decals have arrived from Pattos place so will add these when I get some time. Have gone for peel & stick as I find them excellent to work with and very hardy for door to door rubbing. Body, chassis, guide & driver 3D printed in PLA+ on a Creality Ender 5 Wheel inserts are Resin printed from Slotcar Innovations https://www.facebook.com/Slot-Car-Innovations-101977758704509 Interior & windows vac formed. (thanks to Munter for his help) Some pics of the journey Cheers
  2. 7 points
    While building a Pioneer Legends 34 Ford white kit I wondered what else i have on the 3D printer could fit the chassis So behold the XE Legend Had the Falcon file so it was only a matter of shrinking it down to fit the chassis, fit some outrageous wide guards and there you have it Bit more fun for the track and i'm sure no one else is going to turn up with the same body and scheme on race night
  3. 6 points
    Hi All, I know it's been a while, but it's getting harder to find time, too many projects. Unfortunately, I find it hard to say no when I get requests LOL. @Kevan - Yep sure is Mate @Manuel Sanchez - They will all be freely available when made printable. May I ask, for all the members interested in these cars, put forward a list of which car should be next and so on. I'll try and get one done a week, should be doable as most are just external bodies. One list though. @Oldschool62 - It's finally printed! I tried to get as much detail on the body as possible, printed not to bad. After 42 hours this is the result with no cleanup, yet. It was an ambitious print, 0.4mm shell thickness - 3 shells, 0.6mm Z height, , 100% infill, 0.25mm Horizontal expansion. 15% support Cheers Vlad
  4. 6 points
    Hey Oldskool, Apologies it's taken so long, I had a few projects in front of it. Finally, we can see the light at the end, a couple more hours and it should be ready for you. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated. Cheers NimROD
  5. 6 points
    Racing has been going pretty well here in Auckland. We have switched from SSD to oXigen and we have 7 regulars on Wed nights. We are racing GT3 cars with regulations similar to DiSCA GT3 Euro Series. The cars are magnless (of course). The main difference from DiSCA reg are the use of 17K Baby King/Baby Raport motors (the baby sprinter would be too much on this track) and instead of sponges we use NSR tyres. I wanted to give a go at videoing some of the sessions to show how we do digital slot racing up here. The first video below is the 5 min qualify session: we do qualify to set the grid for Race 1. The second video is Race 1: a 14 min endurance race. Our evening racing consists of four races of 14 min each. We use RCSO2 as a race management software which support fuel and tyre simulations: when we run out of fuel and/or tyres we go in the pitlane for a pit stop. I know that some of you might find the track calls annoying: this is the way we like it because instead of having spare people to marshal we are all actively racing which we think is the best way of using our time (who likes sitting there and marshal!). The videos show the racing this Wed evening when only 5 of us could make it. With 7 drivers we are almost at capacity on this track. This means that if we get more people to join us we might switch to team racing in which case, we can use the spare team mates as marshals. The videos were captured on a phone clamped on a vice on top of a shelf so the quality is not the best. Qualify Race 1 if you are in the Auckland area and would like to try your hand at this sort of racing, let me know. We have spare controllers and cars.
  6. 5 points
    Got some shed time this weekend so decals on. Took the quick & easy path with the peel & stick. I find these good for racing with a car that gets handled a lot.
  7. 5 points
    Thanks guys. Really appreciate the feedback. Vinno the colour is Tamiya Brilliant Blue TS-44. And Mark yep have a can of TS-35 Park Green for the Greens Tuf build. The chassis is a mash up of one I found on Thingiverse with a pod I drew up blended in. We run this class non podded. Wheel base and track is very similar to the Scaley XB.
  8. 5 points
    Having watched Group A racing I would have to say it is one of my favourite race classes. Being a Ford fan I have always had a soft spot for Dick Johnson when Moffat abandoned us in the Group C days. And being a Mustang fan I loved seeing a Mustang racing. Unfortunately Ford didn't take Group A seriously early on or saw more potential in the Turbo cars so the Mustang never go to realise the potential it had due to being under powered. Dick always said the Mustang was a brilliant car across the top of the mountain but really struggled going up the hill. Anyway I finally got myself into gear to get started on Munters resin body of the Group A Mustang. It is a really well done body with not a lot of clean up required, although I still spent a lot of time on it just making sure it looks as tidy as possible. I am trying to keep my Group A class as close in performance as possible and was thinking about the Slot.it Nissan GTR when I found a chassis with the correct wheelbase for the Mustang. The Slot.it Alfa 155 chassis was perfect with the 80mm wheelbase although I had to cut a bit off the sides, front and rear to make it fit. Here are a few photo's so far that show progress. Paint was an area I was struggling to find as I noticed others over the years were using a Tamiya colour which was just not bright enough. After heaps of research and asking local paint suppliers if they could mix me a can I found I could order a rattle can from Europe with the correct colour of Dulon 913 which is a Renault colour called Verte Laitue. This seemed a stupid idea seeing I would need to wait weeks for it to turn up if at all. More research told me it is basically Green and seemed to look like every green button and dot on the internet. So after much searching I found Bunnings sell a Dulux Paint which looked close enough. Happily after painting today it almost looks a perfect match and will be the colour I use for a DJR XE Falcon when I get a body for that too. I am using a Ninco NC2 motor after some of my others were set up with a NSR Baby King which has close enough specs. I have heaps of old Ninco motors and they are great motors when pushing cars that weight over 100 grams which most Resin cars do. Anyway see progress below.
  9. 5 points
    A couple more pictures of the Mustang progress. I said I made up some lenses for the tail lights from a screw box corners. Below is a picture and maybe a little close up so don't look so pretty here. On the car they look fine though. I just cut the corners off a box and then cut and sanded to size. I scribed some lines to get a straight line to paint the different lens colours and glued on with epoxy. The next picture shows some strips I made from sheet styrene for window trim as I thought it would look a little tidier this way. Cut to size, painted and glued on with flexible superglue. Below shows the window trims in place along with some of the decals so far. The window trims look much better than trying to paint a straight line so this will be something I will do from now on. So far so good.
  10. 5 points
    The finished product replaced the standard scalex control tower (which looked very much out of place) http:// The pits were adapted from a Greenhills garage kit & includes the open top level spectator stand above the pits (which is where my Dad and uncle watched the 1965 Australian Grand Prix from, and saw Bruce McLaren win from Jack Brabham is one of the great GPs of all time) http:// And a couple of overall shots down the Pit straight.... http:// http://
  11. 5 points
    Ok, all together - about to start trimming and fitting into the body, once I gouge out the resin cast one..... Bit fiddly, and a few issues with getting the fine point of the iron into tight spaces - but I got there.... I found that tinning each new piece then "sweating" it into place resulted from the easiest way of placing and setting it into the assembly... It looks very much like a VB Commordore grille at present - but I believe it's much smaller than the VB.... My components may be a little thick in scale size - but I believe the overall effect will be worth the effort... perhaps, it's just the shiny brass which makes it look so heavy - matt or satin black will more than likely give the appearance a reduction in size... Pix.. back later, hopefully with an installed pic or two...... frats, Rosco
  12. 4 points
    The XD had it's first hit out tonight and was pretty happy how she went. Came through unscathed with a win by a couple of laps. Was home track advantage though. Good to see something different than a Coupe / Hardtop
  13. 4 points
    Hi Davo43,...........As I am not sure what you would normally do to prepare your cars, so, I will go through a list,.........some you may already know/do, so, ignore the redundant points. 1/ Completely dismantle the car, and check that the main chassis plate is flat.......a small twist can be ignored as it can overcome when setting the front axle ride height. If the chassis is significantly warped, correct this by straightening by using the "hot water" straightening method. 2/ Sand/file/grind the edges of the chassis plate in order that it does not bind on any part of the body,.....you do not need much,...if it is not touching/interfering, it is fine. 3/ The standard guide is just fine, and the stock Scaleauto braid works well, although, you may want to substitute some thinner braid from NSR etc. 4/ Roll both axles on a piece of glass to ensure that they are nice and flat,.......if not, replace. (If they do need to be replaced, 3/32 drill blanks are the way to go. 5/ Both front and rear tyres will need to be glued and trued (absolutely critical on a wood track car),.....if you do not have a tyre machine, get one, or, have a friend true your tires. 6/ If you rules allow, seriously consider substituting a FC-130 motor for the FK-180 that is stock. The FK-180 works well on a plastic track where the longer/stronger magnets provide a considerable amount of magnetic downforce..........on a wood track the additional weight of the FK-180 (it weighs 12/13 gms. more than an FC-130) is detrimental to handling......this added weight at the rear, makes the rear end wash out, and makes slides harder to control. (You will be hard pressed to find any FK-180 motored car at the sharp end of any of the more competitive/advanced wood track proxies. You can screw the FC-130 into the Scaleauto pod without any need/worry about spacers/adapters. 7/ You can use some .5mm silicone washers between the bottom of the pod lugs and the top of the main chassis plate,.......secured by bolts/nylok nuts. The silicone washers provide vibration damping, and more importantly, they allow the pod to progressively twist torsionally in the chassis..............this controlled torsional movement allows the rear outside tyre to load more progressively in a corner, improving grip. (adjust the nuts/bolts so that there is the bare minimum of free plat in the washers,.....do not squish them ! The best silicone washers are currently made by ScaleRacing, ..........I have sent many to some of the Oz and NZ racers. Lots of folks duplicate the above by leaving the pod screws a touch loose, and then use a piece of fibre tape across the bottom of the chassis plate/pod to "control" the movement of the pod. This works just fine, but, the tape will fatigue, and, can peel off. 8/ When assembling the rear axle/gears/wheels, always use 2 thin (5 thou.) spacers between any rotating and non rotating surface ...eg. between a spur gear and bushing face,...wheel hub and bushing face. These spacers will act as thrust washers which will significantly reduce friction and wear. 9/ Once everything else is done/assembled, ..the last thing to do is install the front axle/wheels........... With the front wheels/axle installed, (and the car on a flat/set-up block), and with the front tyres touching , gently push down on one front corner of the chassis plate (ahead of the front wheel)....adjust the top set screw so that when you push down, the axle upright on that side does not move down. Repeat on the other side. When you are satisfied with this process, again gently press down on the front corners of the chassis (one at a time) and when you press, look to see if the opposite rear tyre comes off the surface,...if it does you need to slightly tighten the top set screw (on the side you are pushing down).....repeat on the other side. You may then want to tighten the bottom set screws, to reduce the vertical travel of the front axle (without binding anything)...........although while the car remains on the track, the bottom set screws (sorry,..grub screws for you guys),.....are irrelevant. 10/ I will not go into adding weight, as each car and track is different,......I always build my cars without weight added,....thesting will dictate where and how much is needed. (I do believe the down under clan do tend to favour heavier cars, but, again this is very much car and track dependant, so I can not really offer any concrete help. 11/ You can also add a silicone washer between the chassis plate body mount lug, and the body post (glue a washer to the chassis plate).....this will further reduce vibrations.noise. As far as body float, an inch is as good as a mile.....all you are trying to do isolate the body from the chassis, (to reduce vibrations), so as long as there is some movement/rock, you are good to go. Hope there is something here you can use, ..and let me know if you need more. Cheers Chris Walker This is a Scaleauto (C7R) that I set up for proxy/club racing.....it has done quite well. I have added weight to this chassis, but, I have painted the bits black. This is a Scaleauto Viper,...again with an FC-130 installed. On this car you can just make out the silicone washers between the pod lugs and main chassis plate, and also one glued to the rear body post lug. On this chassis I have also removed the retaining fingers for the "self aligning"..and..."self unaligning" bushings, and installed some better quality single flanged bushings. This was also done on the chassis in he first pic.,....just can't see them
  14. 4 points
    Ferrari 512M - #16 24h Le Mans 1971 drivers: C.Craft, D.Weir code: CA51a availability: April / May 2022 The Ferrari 512S had failed to beat the Porsche 917s in the 1970 World Sportscar Championship. Despite their higher weight and greater consumption, the car had shown winning potential, but the rushed-in construction had left reliability issues unresolved. An unusual bad luck struck at Le Mans, where an accident eliminated four of the five 512S in one stroke. For the ending part of the season Ferrari decided to create a lighter and aerodynamically advanced version: thus the 512M (Modified). The new 'M' model proved immediately faster than the 'S' version, but took its first steps only three weeks before the last Championship race at Österreichring (now Red Bull Ring), where Jacky Ickx led the race until he had to retire due to an alternator failure. The first victory of the new Ferrari took place in South Africa on 7 November 1970, in a race outside the World Championship, in the hands of Ickx / Giunti who reached the finish line three laps ahead in the Porsche 917K driven by Siffert / Ahrens. In 1971, however, despite the excellent end of the 1970 season for the 512M, Ferrari decided to concentrate the company's efforts on a car in line with the 1972 regulations, leaving the 512M to private teams: the 512M, therefore, despite its outstanding performance, could never prove its true value. It remains, however, one of the most beautiful and iconic Sports Prototypes in the history of motorsport. The CA51a model represents the car of Team David Piper which, driven by Chris Craft and David Weir at the Le Mans 24 Hours in 1971. Starting 13th from the grid, the car dropped to 44th place in the 2nd hour of the race but climbed back to an excellent 4th place overall.
  15. 4 points
    Been playing with the printer again, this time a outback feel for the new rally track in the future. HO scale building enlarged to 1/32nd scale Still a work in progress, and needs a bit of weathering as well
  16. 4 points
    Since this is an actual new model and not a repaint of an existing I thought it worth putting together a few pictures and initial impressions of the Tom Walkinshaw TWR John Goss Jaguar that raced and won in the 1985 James Hardie 1000. 1985 was the first year of the International Group A class in Australia and this opened up the Great Race to the Europeans who had the march on the Australian's. Tom Walkinshaw brought across his army of 3 V12 Jaguar XJS race cars and the rest is history. The Jag's had a 5.3 litre V12 and were well ahead of their opposition in this year. Although they were heavy at 1400 kg's they had approximately 500hp and were able to run with the widest tyres and hence a great package early in the classes history. So what of the Scalextric version? It is a great representation of the car and surprisingly narrow and long. The cars advantage is the low roofline which allowed a lower centre of gravity. As far as a slot car this seems to work quite well also. The specifications of the car as follows. Weight 77 grams Length 151 mm Width 54 mm Rear Track 51 mm Height 39 mm The car has all the usual Scalextric features like head and tail lights. Detail is good with excellent tampo printing, body detail with dry break fuel fillers moulded in, radiator grille, wheel detail and bumpers that simulate the brushed stainless look. The interior is limited due to the in line setup used but the driver, roll cage and dashboard detail almost make it perfect. I am one who is more than happy with Scalextrics move to in line motor setups over their typical sidewinder even if it gives up some space for a full interior. The only flaw with the Jaguar I can see is the front tyre gap to the wheel arch which measures at 2 mm. On a 1/32 scale car it is pretty obvious and while I don't want to have a complaint I have to call it out. It makes no difference to how the car runs but takes back a little from what is overall a beautiful representation. The car runs well in magnet form with perfectly round wheels and true axles. I am not a magnet guy so it ran like this on my Policar, Fleischmann plastic track for about 10 laps until I took out the magnet and gave it a run. With no weight added and a light spin on some wet and dry the tyres hooked up OK, not great but it was a bit of run controlling slides. Later I added some weight and took it to 89 grams which makes it the same as my Scalextric Sierra's and M3 BMW's. It did help and the car was surprisingly quick with standard tyres but still over half a second down on my Scalextric cars with Slot.it or NSR tyres. I then added some Slot.it N22 tyres and it was running the same times as my Ford Sierra's and faster than the M3's. Thanks again Scalextric I love the car and keep them coming. After all this I couldn't leave the front end alone and had to fix the front wheel gap by adding a brass axle tube and some thinner braid to drop the front end. Sorry to the purists but my cars are drivers and I had to do it. See the last two pictures if you want to know what I did.
  17. 4 points
  18. 4 points
    I see Metro Hobbies has on their site the Mean Machine and the Compact Pussycat as coming soon Looks like MPC may be re releasing them all. No mention of the other kits but i would assume that if they are available they will stock them All in 1/32nd scale I can see a lot of scratch building going on, plus good track decorations as well.
  19. 4 points
    I planned on posting this up a couple of weeks ago but didn't quite get there. Scalextric have sent us another 2 new Aussie race cars which are always appreciated. Both cars have very attractive liveries and the Falcon in particular a nice change from the Red works Ford Falcons of Allan Moffat. Moffat was my favourite at the time but it is nice to see this car in particular. The paint is stunning and looks fantastic on the track. The French car is the second place getter from Bathurst 1972 and the year Brock beat the big guns in the little XU1 Torana where the wet conditions played into Holden's lap. It was also Brock's first win and the first year the cars were allowed some modifications which was to stop the manufacturers building 160 mph road versions of their cars. The Brock car is another nice looking livery and his second win. Some very nice detail on the car including the Hotwire wheels which look very nice with some sharp detail down to the wheel nuts. My only issue with the Torana is the axles are a little narrow meaning the wheels sit a little too far inboard. I did run both cars with magnets seeing I have plastic track but quickly pulled them out and ran them minus magnet and with the standard tyres. With a little bit of a sanding the Falcon ran very well and prompted me to set up all my other XW and XY Falcon's with a little weight and standard tyres. They drive well and quite realistically although I have noticed half of my Falcons have loose rear bush mounts in the chassis so will fix them at some stage. The Torana tyres really can't cope with the slimline motors power and it is all over the track. So I will eventually sort the Torana too as I find them a challenge but rewarding when the are done properly. Thanks again Scalextric we love the cars and will keep buying them of you keep making them. Maybe a few more liveries during the year please as we just don't seem to get enough of them. And maybe some other Australian cars also I am sure they will sell.
  20. 4 points
    Yello flag Pit road closed (pit entry lanebrane locked) cars on pit road can finish fueling and Tires. Lane brane forces all traffic to a lane outside of pit exit. so safety car may enter track without being hit Safety car enters track from pit exit position of all cars frozen no cars should pass safety car. All cars must maintain position (drivers will have to allow room to change lanes being courteous and maintain position) no laps are counted until are cars are in proper position when all cars are in proper position Pit road opens X= number of laps Safety car returns to pits x= number of laps green flag at start finish line no speeding before green flag this is just how I would do it if I could automate this... im positive its not perfect, but this is the most basic Yellow flag I have experienced over the years. i know there are people who would love Prototypical rules for all of the major Race Divisions, but this seems to work with oval and road course type racing
  21. 4 points
    Bought a Pioneer Legends white kit and did a different paint job on it, hate turning up and having 20 of the same car on the track. Got to thinking while i was building it if anything else would fit the chassis Luckily the slicer program lets you adjust the dimensions of a object to anything you want to print So here's a rough draft of a XD Falcon Legends
  22. 4 points
    Arvo Warren, I will put the cart before the horse, you have the classes and regs. The main idea behind our racing classes and regs is to keep costs as low as possible for everyone, if you don't have a car that meets the regs, that's ok, don't panic, bring what you want to run, there is a very high probability that you can borrow a class car from myself or some one else, we usually bring two of each car class, main runners and the backup cars, soon as we hear you don't have a class car, someone will offer you their backup car. We like to keep it very informal, relaxed and fun, yes we take the mickey out of each other all in good humour of course, there are times when someone (me with myself) will have the shits due to their cars breaking down, crap grip, or simply just having a bloody bad day Bring along your scratch builds, even if they aren't class cars you can still run them and have fun and learn the different tracks hopefully. You know you have an open door to my track for tuning and testing, all we need now is to get these restrictions lifted so we can get back to group racing. Johnno
  23. 4 points
    I dropped the front on my one, more fitting to the way i do things, rip, tear, bust. Removed the front bumper from the chassis and glued it to the body in the same position Ground away the inside supports of the bumper so it followed the silver all the way around Ground the side supports on the body as well as the motor supports on the chassis also the front body mounts. Ground away the bumper supports on the chassis and ground back the top of the spoiler so they were flush. Cut away the support for the lights and ground the bottom of the light board down about a mill Fitted it all back and much more goodera. Before ........ After ....... Still not happy they couldn't get the stripe right, but glad they built it, now for the 3 pack no's 8, 9 & 10, just in time for Xmas
  24. 4 points
    And another with the car finished.
  25. 4 points
    Over the years I’ve been steadily collecting Le Mans winners from 1949 to 1999. Unfortunately there a few Ferrari-sized holes in it that I have not filled. I managed to pick up some old Nincos which will help, but they need a bit of work. These older Ninco are a bit toy-like – the plastic is too thick in some places, the shape not always correct and the paint is translucent. This two-tone paint is a bit of an oddball choice by Ninco. I started work on the 166MM first – the Testa Rossa will take some patience. The 166MM won in 1949 driven by Luigi Chinetti and Lord Selsdon – and really cemented Chinetti’s relationship as Ferrari’s North American distributor and owner of the North American Racing Team. After stripping the car down, I detailed the cockpit in what I thought the correct colours might be. I saw this car in the Le Mans museum trimmed in blue suede upholstery which does not seem period-correct. The instruments were printed on a transparent sticker that I peeled off and replaced after the aluminium paint. The shiny chrome plastic wheels were replaced with Mitoos wire wheels from Armchair Racer. The body was sanded back and repainted in Ferrari red. The early Ferraris were said to be painted in a darker red, but I have not been able to find any period colour photos of the car, so I stuck with what I know. Decals were from Pattos. Here it is assembled. During the race it had a driving light in front of the grill, which was scavenged from an old diecast Cobra. I shaved the body posts and under the interior tray to drop it down and get rid of the wheel arch gaps. The rear details are not quite correct, but I didn't want to mess it up having got this far.
  26. 4 points
    Here is a build I did a while ago to plug a gap in my collection of Le Mans winners. I was always a bit frustrated that Slot It did the 1983 and 1989 winners only in box sets. Getting a white kit and building this one was a no-brainer being a single colour. Not sure the Porsche would be as easy. Nicely packaged parts. The car comes like this – lack of instructions was a bit frustrating. Up to this point, things were going really well. Paint and decals went on nicely. There were a few flaws in the clear coat – I could do a better job now, but it came out OK.
  27. 4 points
    New Scorpius F1 chip fitted into a Thunderslot Lola. Third picture shows new versus old. It’s amazing how fast technology moves. Rick Aussieslotter
  28. 4 points
    Stay tuned.... In case anyone is unfamiliar with the relevance of the expression "A Pack Of &^#%&*)*&" I already sent this video to Maurizio with a detailed explanation of what is required...... Let the plinth wars begin....... Suggested Plinth lettering Nissan Skyline GT-R - 1992 1st Bathurst “Gentleman Jim” Richards, some guy called Skaifey I actually thought it would make a great 3rd line if it could be squeezed onto the plinth. Nissan Skyline GT-R - 1992 1st Bathurst “Gentleman Jim” Richards, some guy called Skaifey " You're A Pack Of &^#%&*)*& " yeah , that works....... And in case anyone actually doesn't know his record Racing career summary Jim Richards Races entered 990 Wins 207 Podiums 510 Pole positions 78 Fastest laps 155 Race win percentage 20.9% Podium percentage 51.5%
  29. 4 points
    Tired of my Fly Alpha (ghastly inline chassis) 512 Coda Lunga sitting in the drawer doing nothing. The Alpha body is lighter than the regular version and it also has a light-weight tray interior which is great if it's required to undergo a change of chassis. Turns out with minimal work a Policar 330 P4/ 412P chassis is easy to install. The pod side mounting holes line up with the body posts and I had to add a new chassis mount at the front behind the guide that lines up with the front body post. Last night it had its 1st real run and was holding its own against a NSR Ford Mk4 so I'm happy with that and it looks real good hunkered down and going for it.
  30. 3 points
    RIP Sir Frank.16 April 1942 - 28 November 2021
  31. 3 points
    Hi folk, wow, have I hit the deck running - seven cars lined up on my workbench all demanding they get closer to completion.. and another three to come - what have I done? Whilst we were up north, I ordered an NSR GT40 mk 2... I am very impressed with NSR models, and I expect there will be more to come... I had a good look at how it was set up ex factory, and something just wasn't right - I could not get module/chassis float when the chassis was fitted to the body, but it was fine on the bench minus body. I took a very close look for anything which may have been fouling - and sadly, NSR have made the exact same mistake that I suffered with all my Slot-It GT40's... that blasted plastic engine and intake manifold - it fouls the motor pod.. As you can see in the pic above, the tab melt method of fitting components did not allow much room to decrease the depth of the plastic engine/intake... There certainly wasn't enough clearance to be gained by simply chomping into the body of it... so, my plan was to remove it and do some trimming - then fit it further up into the body... Another area which needed attention was the power leads to the motor - they were first point of contact between the pod and the body.... I de-soldered and re-fitted them so that the leads and terminal were not proud of the motor body... We can see in the pic below, that the factory placement sits very low in the body - and this fouls the chassis motor and pod... In the pic below, we can see that I have attacked the plastic severely, just barely avoiding breaking through to what will be visible through the rear window of the model. I have also cut away the front mount and opted to fit it flush with the body cowl, rather than have it mounted underneath - this combination gave me sufficient clearance for the motor and pod to float within the adjustment I have set this model up with... So, here we have the side-one pic with motor fitted... and if you compare the first pic to this one - you'll note that a considerable amount of adding clearance needed to be emplaced... So, with a bit of work adjusting float and truing in the tyres... this model is pretty much good to go - it did need a bit of work but I believe it will be one of the best performing GT-40's that I have... the bottom dwellers are the two Scalextric ones I purchased when I re-entered the hobby seven or eight years back... what was I thinking - a second hand "mint" GT-40 I "won" at auction... and paid $85 delivered from W.A....... Scalextric - it has never run correctly, nor did the one I bought direct from a retailer shortly after... then - I found Slot-It, and so commenced a long affair with collecting SI GT40's... eventually building a white kit one that I call "Godzilla" - almost impossible to drive - huge motor, very low gearing... I've learned a bit since way back then.... Ok... one down - 9 to go. Currently on the bench are three NSR 86/89 F1's, two NSR Moslers, a Mr Slotcar McLaren M6A, two T/slot McLaren Elva's, a T/Slot Lola T70, a Revo-Slot Porsche 911 GT-2 white kit, two Revo Porsche 911 GT2's, a Revo Dodge viper and of course - work continues on the LJ XU-1 build.. it has to be completed before Bathurst next year - the 50th anniversary of when PB took it over the finish line to claim his first Bathurst in 1972.. Ok, guess I'm back.... frats, Rosco
  32. 3 points
    My only complaint is the wheels are too small. The rest of the car is great and I am well and truely looking forward to smashing it into Forests Elbow in the rain and driving my Dick Johnson Sierra past it. https://youtu.be/W9IBSJPadf8
  33. 3 points
    The beautiful R-Motorsport Castrol Aston Martin Vantage GT3 is now available to add to your #Scalextric collection
  34. 3 points
    iOS VERSUS ANDROID FOR SCORPIUS APPS Hi Guys, iOS versus Android, the age old debate. Which is better? Especially for digital slot cars? The answer is they both work perfectly. They are equally as easy to use for wireless upgrades to products using Bluetooth. Personally I use Apple products? Why? They were first to market and I was an early adapter. They led the way simply because they were more innovative and simply better than MicroSoft (Unfortunate name if you think about it ). Jokes aside Android out sells Apple 5 to 1 worldwide. But there is a reason for this. Only Apple uses iOS but 1,300 companies use Android. What’s the big difference for me is the user experience, for me I find iOS far more self intuitive than Android. Just an observation. As I said I use both. Ive had another full on wireless device app written for a non slot related product I built using first in iOS then Android. Both worked 100% immediately with no bug fixing required. The tech is reasonably easy with most 2nd year uni students bri f able to nail it. Currently Scorpius uses Android to load firmware updates into our Gen II decoder , our Nano decoder and soon our new Maximus decoder. Only yesterday I spoke to Team Scorpius app guru Faruk and commissioned him to duplicate our new app in iOS in preparation for the release of Maximus decoder in late November/early December 2021. I already know it will work as we are lifting the code straight off the other non slot related app I had built recently which works 100%. At Scorpius we won’t discriminate Apple or Android users or tell you to change devices due to poor firmware. That’s our promise. A hobby should be fun and not stressful. Modern technology is daunting for some of us and the addition of bugs can make the experience tiring and time consuming. The last thing you want to hear is when people spend more time attempting loading firmware than racing, and then give up after investing a substantial amount of money, often selling it back into market at a substantial financial loss. That’s bad for the hobby many are trying to build up. A hobby must be relaxing and fun, not stressful. So in a week or 3 we will see our iOS app for Scorpius along side our Android app. Both will work perfectly or your money cheerfully and immediately refunded. That’s our promise, like all our products. Interestingly enough no one had ever exercised that option, ever. You work hard for your coin, not headaches. Heres a re-run of our recently developed Scorpius app powered by Android. Enjoy guys. I’m loving’ it. https://youtu.be/g3cQ9jpB-7s
  35. 3 points
    THANKYOU JOHN HUBERTS. Hi Guys, I’ve given credit to all the team here at Scorpius, but I must mention John in particular. I’ll never forget trying to source an engineer in 2006. I approached 17 engineers. All of them said they weren’t capable of the project with one saying it wasn’t even possible! One engineer said he couldn’t do it but he knew someone who could, John Huberts. I contacted John and he said the project is right up his alley and that he was flying from Brisbane to Melbourne the next day and he detour via Sydney if I could pick him up. He entered my games room and seen the track and was immediately interested. I gave him the brief in words, no specification. He flew onto Melbourne. A week later he contacted me and said he was on the way to Melbourne again and if I could pick him him up at Sydney airport. We drove to my place where he immediately put the car on the track and starting doing laps.I was blown away. The first 2.4GHz slot car was born. The rest is history. What I like about John is his skill set and speed. He had no lab and humbly works out of his garage where he has a desk, storage facilities, scopes, soldering station, IR oven and his laptop. That’s it. A story. I received the professor motor handle and forwarded the handle to John. The spec was basic. 2.4GHZ, wirelessly upgradeable firmware, hall sensor, an LCD screen with menu, 3 buttons, 3 knobs and ran on 3V. John designed the board shape and hardware in 48 hours and ordered the boards. While we waited for rapid prototypes he wrote all the firmware in a week. On day 18 the boards arrived. On day 19 he uploaded the firmware, day 20 he tested it and in day 21 he sent via express mail. On day 22 I tested it. It was perfect in every way. Not a single glitch. I’m still gobsmacked a decade later. Proficient in hardware and firmware it saves having 2 seperate engineers. He also dabbles in software programs for diagnostics etc. I look around now and see University trained engineers who supposedly lecture and consult, have labs and make huge claims, with not a single completed project trying who wish to critique others work and commercialise their ideas yet lack basic 2nd year uni skills like soldering and hide under the banner of hobbyist to suit their agenda. How an electronic engineer (or are they?) can claim to be a electronic hobbyist is extremely fascinating. An engineer can sure have hobbies but to hide behind the hobbyist facade is concerning. So hobbyist it is. So again all this makes me realise how invaluable John is. Can the project survive without him? Probably but it will be multiple times harder this multiple times more expensive and take multiple times longer. Firmware is the key. Hardware engineers are a dime a dozen, firmware engineers as rare as hens teeth. So John thanks champion and thanks for the latest round of amazing work ie the light gantry, Nano decoder and Scalextric braid plate decoder design, all unique products and world first. Rick Pic: Second generation Scorpius controller and Scorpius chipped Slot.it car.
  36. 3 points
    Typical of me is to start a new build at the end of a just completed Tasman Series,this build follows that rather strange pattern. Nothing too different for me as I had this chassis laying around and I had the body which I got from Phil about 18 months back I began the build as a lockdown thing, as we are in a lockdown and there is absolutely no way I was not going to do something "slot related" No track as yet for me to test on but that's okay I will get to that in good time Hopefully we will see a 2022 Tasman series and just maybe a chance for this to race
  37. 3 points
    I finally got some time to finish this project off. I scratched up a new spoiler and threw on some paint / decals. It's been a fun build and the car runs really nicely. Thanks for looking.
  38. 3 points
    Pat dropped off a new body for me yesterday 3d printed Holden HQ Monaro Thanks Dave West for putting us onto the website
  39. 3 points
    We abuse Crocket mercilously, from calling him Smokey Yanuck, to telling him he couldn't lie straight in bed - all because he got some of his cars from the previous track owner . . who we called Smokey Yanuck and told HIM him he couldn't lie straight in bed. We accuse various others - probably including me, of being dirty cheats, filthy rotten nerfers, girls, ladies, offer some braille lessons, and so on. Much fun. Yep. We have a pretty healthy club vibe. A most common saying is "are we having fun yet" Sometimes guys come without cars or controllers, they don't feel like racing, maybe tired, or were just too busy to think about getting ready, but they still want to come to club, marshal, eat food, engage in the banter. I think over half our members are from when we began in 2007, and we have more racing now, than I think any time in the past
  40. 3 points
    Mr Slotcar is well known for it's Mr Trax brand of modular track systems. And as of January 2021, we were told that Magnabraid from Magnatech in the U.S. was ceasing it's manufacturing due to increased costs and higher MOQ's. This sent a chill down our spine, as magnabraid is the main ingredient on all of our modular and custom systems. So we bought all of the stock that was leftover! But that hasn't fixed the problem. As we are now at least 25 track sets further on from January 2021 and fast running out of Magnabraid. A few months ago we approached many wire braiding companies in the USA, China, Spain, Germany and of course here in Australia to produce a specific braid to our specifications. These wire specs are not the same as Magnabraid. Although our specs stil produced an effective magnetic type of braid in the same same wiring configuration as the Magnabraid. It will be called Mag-braid! At the moment our braiders are running our first batch of 5,600 metres @ 6.3mm wide x 0.6mm thick. Thats about 100kgs and constitutes 1/3 of the costs in shipping. Once we have our hands on the first delivery, the braid will undergo some testing on our production. Hopefully within a short time thereafter we'll release it for retail sales through mrslotcar.com. The sad thing is we had to go overseas as the Australian braiders came back with pricing that was so ridiculous, we had no alternative to source it elsewhere. Nevertheless, the final pricing will be marginally better than what we had been selling the magnabraid for earlier this year. It will also come as the self-adhesive mag-braid exclusively through Mr Slotcar.
  41. 3 points
  42. 3 points
    Track is now painted (2 coates of Berger Paving paint) and is now braided. I have used Tinned Copper as Magna Braid is unobtainable at present. I have run some test Laps and am very pleased with the layout and the grip levels.
  43. 3 points
    Not really worthy of calling this one a repaint. Found a Bentley GT3 worth converting to a Bathurst 12 Hours entry. A few decals converts it to the 2015 car of Smith/Kane/Bell.
  44. 3 points
    On a recent visit to a wonderful automobile museum in Launceston, I managed to pick up a few very nice di-cast models (VW Beetle, AC Cobra & Aston-Martin DB5) to add to the paddock car park scene.... http:// http:// That's all for now !
  45. 3 points
    Making Trax Twelve months ago I was writing of the unknown future we had ahead of us with Covid 19. Victoria was particularly hard hit, but there was a good news story in the slot world, and that was the Mr Slot Car slot shop businesses operating out of southeast Melbourne. AMC spoke to one of its owners, Peter Van Horssen to find out what has been happening. Australian Muscle Car: When and how did you first get into the retail side of the hobby? Peter Van Horssen: I had built a track and placed it onto an old trailer, which allowed me to roll it into the middle of the garage for us to play with. Soon after, my neighbour suggested I take it along to a fair at my daughter’s new primary school. Amazingly, I got requests for bookings on the day, and so the Mr Slot Car story started. AMC: Who makes up the Mr Slot Car business? PVH: There are three of us, with another fellow on standby on busy weekends. With my wife Debbie, and Peter Dimmers, we run the shop from week to week. That includes, retailing, hosting parties, corporate hire, design and manufacturing the modular range of Mr Trax products, importing and some distribution. And sometimes, local and interstate deliveries. AMC: How did you get to this point? PVH: We started in 1994 with a single portable slot car track mounted on a trailer, and added another one the following year. We also purchased an old eight lane commercial hill climb track and located it within a skate centre in Cranbourne. In 1996 we moved to a factory in Narre Warren where we added a drag strip and a smaller hire track made from Ninco plastic sections. In 2001 we moved into Dandenong and after 16 years and a mix of 19 different tracks over that period, we made the latest move where we are now in our own purpose-built 800 m² facility which includes the raceway and licensed café with an adjoining CNC manufacturing complex where we make the track modules. AMC: The onset of Covid 19 must have come at a bad time. How has the last twelve months gone for you? PVH: Like other businesses, we had to rethink our strategies. It made us concentrate in other areas to maximize our survival, like increasing our product range and design features. AMC: How did the wooden track side of the business come about? PVH: I think it was in 2013, when it was our turn to host the Model Car Nationals slot meeting in Dandenong. I decided to design and build a new track to suit that race meet. Since then, we have built many commercial and corporate tracks that sit in almost every state of Australia. I got started with a router. I’ve spent many hours crawling over sheets of timber on the floor with a long straight edge and a hand-made compass. It can be a long and tedious process but thankfully I’ve now moved to CNC manufacture. My good friend Miguel La Torre (an Engineer) set me up with a licensed CNC program and said, “I know you’ll do something with this”. Miguel saw my vision and knew what I needed to progress it to the next stage. Now, after many hours of practicing, CNC programming has become second nature. AMC What designs are available using your modular track system? PVH: At the moment we have four systems available with a multitude of combinations. The folding two piece track we call the Lockdown Track in five options/sizes. We also have a modular speedway oval system in seven designs. Then there is our regular two and four lane modular system with about fifteen modular tables to choose from. And our latest 2021 release is the Mr Trax hybrid system. It has all the regular analogue two lane modular pieces plus the new digital sections. So now you can assemble as many modular tables as you like, and at any time, insert digital lane change sections to run up to six cars on two lanes, with pit lane access and re-fueling etc. AMC: What makes up your typical track systems? PVH: The tracks are made predominantly from MDF, supported on steel folding legs, and for digital racing we have integrated the Carrera lane change system into our timber tracks. It makes it easy for existing or new customers to add a commercially available product, be it a car or an accessory, to our hybrid system. The track surface is a special black paint we use - a well-guarded secret! It gets a great result whether you are racing with rubber or foam tyres. Our most popular controllers are the Slot.it controllers for the avid racer. And the DS Controllers are a great entry level. Power is supplied by the Hop Wo range of power supplies. It’s capable of handling any track size and power requirements up to 80 Amps. For race timing we use the Trackmate system. It serves the racing and drag racing community. Their range is extensive and very good, and we are the resellers in Australia. AMC: How do you engage with your clients? PVH: We go through all of the basic questions: Is it for corporate use or home. Do they want to hire or buy. What area is available. How many lanes are required. What is your largest group of people. What is the budget. Do they need a full turnkey operation. Do they need delivery/installation/training. We have worked with clients such as Mercedes, Kia, Phillip Island GP circuit, Crown Casino, GP teams, CAMS, trade shows, V8 Supercars, Good Friday Appeal. For custom manufacture we get down to the nitty-gritty. What is the footprint of the space – where are the doors and windows, where is the power, how will people get around the track. Then we get down to systems, how many lanes, analogue or digital. Will it be fast sweeping, or rally style, what kind of cars do they race. I often get asked about doing a Bathurst track, but it is hard to replicate a specific track and not waste space, so then I talk about making something similar that will maximise the amount of track, rather than replicate it exactly. Most people go that way once I have shown what I can produce for them. AMC Do you do scenery as well? PVH: Scenery can be a challenge. We do little ourselves apart from green infields, track borders and fences. You can put in a lot of hours to get a reasonable result which is very hard to make for a good price. We recently acquired the Australian agency for Magnetic Racing. They specialize in high quality, detailed laser cut buildings which are supplied in kit form. The kits come unpainted, so customers can put their own stamp on the buildings to suit their layouts. But if they have the budget and want it made, our good friend Tony Di Pastena (see AMC#103) can make detailed pieces. I can supply the CNC base templates that will drop straight into the track. Tony will add park benches, turnstyles, marshals huts, grandstands – things that suit the layout and it’s all nicely assembled and ready to go. AMC: Where to from here? PVH: There are many loose bits of paper with ideas floating around my office. And every now and then, I decide to explore one of them and bring it to reality. We are forever designing more modular sections to increase the range and versatility. AMC: How can people find out more about your services? PVH: Simple, www.mrslotcar.com or call during business hours 03-9796-3830.
  46. 3 points
    Mr Slotcar, Slot Car Racing and Retail Center, for all your slot car needs. Established in 1994 with a single Mobile Slotcar track. We attended parties, school fetes and corporate functions all over Victoria. In 1997 we opened our first Slotcar Raceway in Narre Warren. 4 years later we moved into Dandenong. Hosting 100’s of parties and staged some National race meetings. In 2017 we designed and built our new 800m2 facility in Hallam. It boasts a number of large slot car tracks, two ¼ mile drag strips, a 2nd level, licensed café, dining/party area and fully serviced retail shop. The Team at Mr Slotcar ... Peter Dimmers, Debbie Shaw and Peter Van Horssen Business hours (subject to change) Normal Hours Tuesdays: 10am - 5pm Wed- Fri: 10am - 9pm Saturday: 10am - 7 pm Sunday: 12pm - 5pm Always Closed Mondays Private Functions upstairs or downstairs by prior arrangements Holidays Australia Day Normal Hours Labour Day Closed Good Friday from 12pm Easter Monday Closed Anzac Day from 12pm Queens Birthday Closed Melbourne Cup Normal Hours Closed Xmas 25th - January 2nd Always Closed on Mondays Here are some pics ...
  47. 3 points
    Don't know hard I will race them but they will be raced. I don't have many display cars.
  48. 3 points
    A bit late but here is my Turbine car that I raced at Hornsby Vintage,brass & pianno wire chassis,Plafit Cheetah motor, not the nicest build but a very good car to drive. Was very competitive until some scallywags turned up with open wheeler retro's Cheers Jimmy
  49. 3 points
    Hoping a dulux tune up will shave time off my lap times! Was a white body version
  50. 3 points
    Here's my entry for the Home Racing World 2021 World Championship Proxy in the USA & Canada using a Slot it Porsche body & any Chassis. I'm using a Plafit Chassis in this case a Red Devil which has the Aluminium base plate which is much lighter than the standard brass one that comes with the 3300. Total weight for this car comes in at 93.8 gms & is by far my lightest Plafit chassied car & if it performs as well as it's testing will give me great feedback for 2022 GT3 that I'm currently building. general fitness goals Cheers Jimmy
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