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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/03/2021 in all areas

  1. 7 points
    Hi all During last our last lockdown, which thankfully didn't last too long, I decided to purchase some 3D files. This is my first attempt at a mostly self made slotcar - one of my goals for my 3D printer. Body was printed on the smallest wall thickness. It lost a little detail but I plan to race this in our Aussie Touring Car class so not too bothered with how pretty it is. Decals have arrived from Pattos place so will add these when I get some time. Have gone for peel & stick as I find them excellent to work with and very hardy for door to door rubbing. Body, chassis, guide & driver 3D printed in PLA+ on a Creality Ender 5 Wheel inserts are Resin printed from Slotcar Innovations https://www.facebook.com/Slot-Car-Innovations-101977758704509 Interior & windows vac formed. (thanks to Munter for his help) Some pics of the journey Cheers
  2. 6 points
    The release of the Slot.It Winfield Nissan really reignited my interest in slots. It had been about 4 years since I'd bought a car, and other than very occasionally dragging out some plastic track, I haven't really had much of a drive for about 10 years. Since we moved to the coast I haven't found anyone else down here who races and I quickly ran out of talent at my first go at building a routed track. I was occasionally taking a couple of cars up to Fyshwick, but once they moved to the other side of Canberra I became a bit of a slot car collector. Anyway, Godzilla was enough of an incentive and Hulme Park Raceway, named obviously after the late, great Denny. I've indulgently named parts of the track based on some of my favourite drives past and emerging. It measures 5.09m on a 180cm x 50cm footprint. Painted with Dulux Suede with a very light sand with 200grit paper just to take the top off the texture. My Formula NSR #27 Ferrari did a 3.5 pretty much out of the box, and two Pioneer Mustangs, one set up for magnetless running on wood, the other set up with a magnet both did 3.6s. I'm hoping to use Race Coordinator on my laptop with a webcam for timing, although having some issues setting it up. PC Lap Counter is triggering, just need to dial the sensitivity in on the hotspot and be a little less reliant on the lap timer on the phone and actually sort it out. And to pretty it up, with some lines and fences and the rest. Anyway, long story short, glad I finally got around to doing something, even if it's small, it'll keep me occupied.
  3. 6 points
    Hi All, I know it's been a while, but it's getting harder to find time, too many projects. Unfortunately, I find it hard to say no when I get requests LOL. @Kevan - Yep sure is Mate @Manuel Sanchez - They will all be freely available when made printable. May I ask, for all the members interested in these cars, put forward a list of which car should be next and so on. I'll try and get one done a week, should be doable as most are just external bodies. One list though. @Oldschool62 - It's finally printed! I tried to get as much detail on the body as possible, printed not to bad. After 42 hours this is the result with no cleanup, yet. It was an ambitious print, 0.4mm shell thickness - 3 shells, 0.6mm Z height, , 100% infill, 0.25mm Horizontal expansion. 15% support Cheers Vlad
  4. 5 points
    Have now got the decals on now so can call this one done. These are Patto's peel and stick which a) are easy to apply & reposition & b) good for cars that get a lot of use. These ones were a bit tricky as they were the 'full side of car' ones which include the car's colour. I needed to trim them all close to the edges to remove the background colour.
  5. 5 points
    The XD had it's first hit out tonight and was pretty happy how she went. Came through unscathed with a win by a couple of laps. Was home track advantage though. Good to see something different than a Coupe / Hardtop
  6. 5 points
    Got some shed time this weekend so decals on. Took the quick & easy path with the peel & stick. I find these good for racing with a car that gets handled a lot.
  7. 5 points
    Thanks guys. Really appreciate the feedback. Vinno the colour is Tamiya Brilliant Blue TS-44. And Mark yep have a can of TS-35 Park Green for the Greens Tuf build. The chassis is a mash up of one I found on Thingiverse with a pod I drew up blended in. We run this class non podded. Wheel base and track is very similar to the Scaley XB.
  8. 4 points
    Tru-blu II has arrived. Made for a 'details challenged' mate for his birthday. Second one went a lot quicker as I printed the body on approx 30deg angle so the roof, boot & bonnet were smooth as. The filling effort was mostly around the lower side. Used up the leftover Patto's decals as they come with two sets. It just needs running gear now.
  9. 4 points
    I’ve had a go at modelling, in 1:32, the Corkscrew corner of Laguna Seca fame. I designed it to print on my Prusa i3 and then glue/dowel/weld the pieces together. I ended up with two track pieces – an R2 left turn and an R3 right turn. See a YouTube of the 1:32 Corkscrew in action here. (0:22) See a YouTube of how the track pieces join here. (3:11) Not all my cars can make it through the corner, especially the inner lane of the R2. My V8Supercars with mid magnet are fine. My magless cars are fine. My modern Nascars don’t make it – a combination of low ride height and a strong rear magnet. My Slot.it 956/962 Porsches can get through but the speed has to be just right and they slither over the initial hump. Thanks for having a Captain Cook.
  10. 4 points
    Finally got the Lola finished, fairly happy with the overall look of the car, although the cold weather here isn't making it any easier, I guess nimble fingers are no longer , along with other parts of my body! anyway hope you like
  11. 4 points
    Hi Guys, Heres the latest detailed prototype lane changer by Scorpius, tweaked by Mr Trax himself. It’s a CNC version of the hand routed prototypes made previously. Soon you will be able to buy these and install whatever electronics you wish. Any digital system actually except SCX. It will come in kit form late in 2022. All the wiring recesses, braid feeds, and pockets are neatly routed in place ready to go. The Ninco track pieces actually clip into place. More pics of that later. Rick
  12. 4 points
    At racing this week I mentioned that I had made a dual motor 4WD Metro a while back. I had a few questions about it so here she is: I scratched up a chassis using some old sidewinder chassis's that I had lying around. It goes great. Handles really well and, with all the weight spread evenly front and rear, it sure doesn't need any extra ballast!
  13. 4 points
    You're asking the $64,000 question. For what it's worth here's my observations. Brumos's car is an NSR so it has the benefit of coming out of the factory with a lightweight body and dimensions (width, length, height) tested by NSR to be pretty spot on. Your car has a 3D chassis, probably not designed by a team of engineers for best performance but designed to fit the Scalex Honda body. My car, like yours, also has an aftermarket chassis but that chassis is from one of the best handling cars ever built - the Scaleauto Toyota GT1. It's fitted to a Scalex Calibra body that I lightened as much as I could with a dremel. I also spent weeks testing with lead in various spots so it was as perfect as I could make it. I had 4 x Scaleauto chassis's set up in different ways and constantly tested them against each other to get the best one. Then I gave it to my brother who made it even better. I had 8 other proxy cars I went through before deciding on the Calibra. Some were close in performance. One was better but not as consistent and you must have a car that is easy to drive on the limit that doesn't deslot. I spend a lot of time getting the front of the car setup so it (almost) never deslots, just slides out. There's probably a dozen other things that make my car magic to drive but there's no way I can tell you what the magic ingredient is. If I knew then all my cars would be race winners and unfortunately they aren't. Hope I haven't confused you even more. Cheers Paul
  14. 4 points
    The modular Bathurst track over 5 tables is on the drawing board. It will come as a MrTrax Hybrid Plus digital system. Meaning it will run (6) Carrera digital cars plus ghost cars. Or 2 analogue cars and thus the Lane Changers and Pit lane will be non-active. We superimposed the topography of Mount Panorama into the landscape to give it some realism. For those purists, you'll just have to suck it up, because it's not possible to replicate every corner detail perfectly! And from a modular point of view, this is how the layout needs to be. I haven't included the Lane changers on this drawing. But I do have a version with the Lane changers in place. The topography took a lot of time to source and re-jig into my modular version. The landscape should look pretty good if we can scale match the contour lines. The 4 tables making up "Conrod", are 120cm x 180cm. Whilst the larger 5th table is 120cm x 240cm. We're hoping to get between 30cm and 40cm in height.
  15. 4 points
    Found a few different types of cheep digital clocks on line $2 - $4 each Went on tinkercad and designed a few panels, then printed them out and painted them and of course i had to add it to the Race Control Centre and put the communications array on top as well
  16. 4 points
    Saw something like this for a HO car setup, so i thought i'd have a play with tinkercad and see what turns out Made up a framework Then added a "slide in" background Then added some colour And put it all together The base is standard, just add different slide in backs for different cars or makes. Also been playing with printing and painting some small signage for future tracks
  17. 4 points
    RIP Sir Frank.16 April 1942 - 28 November 2021
  18. 4 points
    Hi Davo43,...........As I am not sure what you would normally do to prepare your cars, so, I will go through a list,.........some you may already know/do, so, ignore the redundant points. 1/ Completely dismantle the car, and check that the main chassis plate is flat.......a small twist can be ignored as it can overcome when setting the front axle ride height. If the chassis is significantly warped, correct this by straightening by using the "hot water" straightening method. 2/ Sand/file/grind the edges of the chassis plate in order that it does not bind on any part of the body,.....you do not need much,...if it is not touching/interfering, it is fine. 3/ The standard guide is just fine, and the stock Scaleauto braid works well, although, you may want to substitute some thinner braid from NSR etc. 4/ Roll both axles on a piece of glass to ensure that they are nice and flat,.......if not, replace. (If they do need to be replaced, 3/32 drill blanks are the way to go. 5/ Both front and rear tyres will need to be glued and trued (absolutely critical on a wood track car),.....if you do not have a tyre machine, get one, or, have a friend true your tires. 6/ If you rules allow, seriously consider substituting a FC-130 motor for the FK-180 that is stock. The FK-180 works well on a plastic track where the longer/stronger magnets provide a considerable amount of magnetic downforce..........on a wood track the additional weight of the FK-180 (it weighs 12/13 gms. more than an FC-130) is detrimental to handling......this added weight at the rear, makes the rear end wash out, and makes slides harder to control. (You will be hard pressed to find any FK-180 motored car at the sharp end of any of the more competitive/advanced wood track proxies. You can screw the FC-130 into the Scaleauto pod without any need/worry about spacers/adapters. 7/ You can use some .5mm silicone washers between the bottom of the pod lugs and the top of the main chassis plate,.......secured by bolts/nylok nuts. The silicone washers provide vibration damping, and more importantly, they allow the pod to progressively twist torsionally in the chassis..............this controlled torsional movement allows the rear outside tyre to load more progressively in a corner, improving grip. (adjust the nuts/bolts so that there is the bare minimum of free plat in the washers,.....do not squish them ! The best silicone washers are currently made by ScaleRacing, ..........I have sent many to some of the Oz and NZ racers. Lots of folks duplicate the above by leaving the pod screws a touch loose, and then use a piece of fibre tape across the bottom of the chassis plate/pod to "control" the movement of the pod. This works just fine, but, the tape will fatigue, and, can peel off. 8/ When assembling the rear axle/gears/wheels, always use 2 thin (5 thou.) spacers between any rotating and non rotating surface ...eg. between a spur gear and bushing face,...wheel hub and bushing face. These spacers will act as thrust washers which will significantly reduce friction and wear. 9/ Once everything else is done/assembled, ..the last thing to do is install the front axle/wheels........... With the front wheels/axle installed, (and the car on a flat/set-up block), and with the front tyres touching , gently push down on one front corner of the chassis plate (ahead of the front wheel)....adjust the top set screw so that when you push down, the axle upright on that side does not move down. Repeat on the other side. When you are satisfied with this process, again gently press down on the front corners of the chassis (one at a time) and when you press, look to see if the opposite rear tyre comes off the surface,...if it does you need to slightly tighten the top set screw (on the side you are pushing down).....repeat on the other side. You may then want to tighten the bottom set screws, to reduce the vertical travel of the front axle (without binding anything)...........although while the car remains on the track, the bottom set screws (sorry,..grub screws for you guys),.....are irrelevant. 10/ I will not go into adding weight, as each car and track is different,......I always build my cars without weight added,....thesting will dictate where and how much is needed. (I do believe the down under clan do tend to favour heavier cars, but, again this is very much car and track dependant, so I can not really offer any concrete help. 11/ You can also add a silicone washer between the chassis plate body mount lug, and the body post (glue a washer to the chassis plate).....this will further reduce vibrations.noise. As far as body float, an inch is as good as a mile.....all you are trying to do isolate the body from the chassis, (to reduce vibrations), so as long as there is some movement/rock, you are good to go. Hope there is something here you can use, ..and let me know if you need more. Cheers Chris Walker This is a Scaleauto (C7R) that I set up for proxy/club racing.....it has done quite well. I have added weight to this chassis, but, I have painted the bits black. This is a Scaleauto Viper,...again with an FC-130 installed. On this car you can just make out the silicone washers between the pod lugs and main chassis plate, and also one glued to the rear body post lug. On this chassis I have also removed the retaining fingers for the "self aligning"..and..."self unaligning" bushings, and installed some better quality single flanged bushings. This was also done on the chassis in he first pic.,....just can't see them
  19. 4 points
    Ferrari 512M - #16 24h Le Mans 1971 drivers: C.Craft, D.Weir code: CA51a availability: April / May 2022 The Ferrari 512S had failed to beat the Porsche 917s in the 1970 World Sportscar Championship. Despite their higher weight and greater consumption, the car had shown winning potential, but the rushed-in construction had left reliability issues unresolved. An unusual bad luck struck at Le Mans, where an accident eliminated four of the five 512S in one stroke. For the ending part of the season Ferrari decided to create a lighter and aerodynamically advanced version: thus the 512M (Modified). The new 'M' model proved immediately faster than the 'S' version, but took its first steps only three weeks before the last Championship race at Österreichring (now Red Bull Ring), where Jacky Ickx led the race until he had to retire due to an alternator failure. The first victory of the new Ferrari took place in South Africa on 7 November 1970, in a race outside the World Championship, in the hands of Ickx / Giunti who reached the finish line three laps ahead in the Porsche 917K driven by Siffert / Ahrens. In 1971, however, despite the excellent end of the 1970 season for the 512M, Ferrari decided to concentrate the company's efforts on a car in line with the 1972 regulations, leaving the 512M to private teams: the 512M, therefore, despite its outstanding performance, could never prove its true value. It remains, however, one of the most beautiful and iconic Sports Prototypes in the history of motorsport. The CA51a model represents the car of Team David Piper which, driven by Chris Craft and David Weir at the Le Mans 24 Hours in 1971. Starting 13th from the grid, the car dropped to 44th place in the 2nd hour of the race but climbed back to an excellent 4th place overall.
  20. 4 points
    Been playing with the printer again, this time a outback feel for the new rally track in the future. HO scale building enlarged to 1/32nd scale Still a work in progress, and needs a bit of weathering as well
  21. 4 points
  22. 3 points
  23. 3 points
    I've 3d printed some paint pen holders that run in the slot. Done two widths - one for Scalextric and one for wood routed:
  24. 3 points
    Round 9 will be held on Dave's track in 2 weeks time - 14 August. This will be the 2nd last race of the proxy (about time ). Cheers Paul
  25. 3 points
    Track is in and still in one piece
  26. 3 points
    Started a new build to get back the garage for parking another car in, funnily enough. 3 x tables are 2400x1200 each Losing elevation changes and an overpass the last track had, hinges are quite close to the walls, but a happy compromise to still have a track. Routing done, pretty simple lay out but hopefully allow for some decent car speeds even in corners. Starting to paint, going for a smooth gloss enamel finish for best grip and least tyre wear:
  27. 3 points
    Barriers/fences finally finished, next will be power and lane changers
  28. 3 points
    Brilliant night of racing and banter in Mac's slotcave. The best team won with a very high standard of banter and keeping it in the slot. Was great to be back where it all started racing with the slotjockies you have all become. Thanks for keeping the Piebone 400 alive and fizzing. Chur bro's
  29. 3 points
    Been a while since an update, motivation dropped among other things. Will hopefully have the walls/fences done today and then power is next
  30. 3 points
    Another little scenic addition, on the old Longford Circuit about halfway along Tannery straight was thew following building (shot taken from RFactor track) http:// So, I had a go at re-creating this impressive building on the Sorell Creek (Longford themed) Track. Again, as with most of my buildings, very easy foamboard construction. This time covered with textured brick sheets that add a slight 3d effect to it. http:// http:// http:// cheers !
  31. 3 points
    This was a fun little project to kill a few hours in the shed. I have an idea on stretching another model so this gave a practice run. Came out ok and runs nicely on a lowered stock chassis.
  32. 3 points
    Finished the last of the braiding, this piece will be interesting if it works as planned
  33. 3 points
    Braid is down, now onto walls/fences then power, or maybe power first and careful laps Here's how I made the braid joins on removable sections, al put together with no power taps and cars do a full lap with 9 volt battery
  34. 3 points
    HI folk, my latest "kitbash" are stripping and re-building/painting two 1965 Mini Coopers. I had one of the original Scalextric ones in green with a beige interior and front wheel drive back in the mid '60's.... dog of a thing, tiny open frame motor and issues with getting the braid to sit on the rails without the tyres getting grip on the track... I practically destroyed it using "kid's" tools (pliers, screwdrivers and other very coarse and crude implements)... and it ended up as a parts body and what was left of the chassis.... pity, it would be a collector's item now. I have been making cars for each member of my family, and thus far have produced a number of models that I actually liked... I asked each one which car they wanted - it it was available, I'd model it for them. We've had 911 Porches, a Dodge Viper, a McLaren and my latest request was for (above anything else he could have asked for) - a Mini Cooper.... I was shocked - it certainly wouldn't have been my choice! not if the first one I had was anything to go on... Knowing he'd have trouble keeping up with the rest of the family on the track, I took sympathy - and ordered two..... the other one so that it could be placed as dedicated competition on a level playing field..... so, it now looks as if I'm paying attention to two models that I really don't want to attack yet..... Both of them came in what I consider to be "fugly".... silver roof with an annoyingly maroon/red body... some might like it, but not me. For me - the "only" colour these little cars should be is British Racing Green with a white roof..... the other one has been asked to be sprayed SMS Pearl Ice with a silver roof (so, the roof is done for me with that model). I started to strip the first one down - and continue to be disgusted on how these are assembled.... hot soldering iron or something on "fitted" parts.... which need to be ground out to remove them.... and stored. I got down to the bare body, but it was a lot of work - some of the ornaments are tiny, and tedious work.... lights, badges, bumpers... the window comes away in two parts... The interior is a shocker - heavy as all heck, but - the dash is very detailed and a credit to the person responsible for tooling it up. I tried all sorts of solvents that were plastic safe to remove the paint..... and it took ages. From metho, brake fluid and SMS paint remover... I had to work and work to get the blasted red paint off.... the silver came away very easily - so, if you have one of these models, you might like to clear coat it with something like SMS Ultra Clear 2K... I used SMS etch primer, then white primer on the red plastic substrate of the model.... blocked the white primer back - and sprayed SMS white .... the red plastic "leached" through.... so, I had to block back again and spraye my favourite SMS grey primer on a little thicker - blocked down and sprayed SMS white top coats.... all good. For the lower body, I used SMS black primer over the etch.... and two generous coats of SMS BRG.... it came up a treat. I used Tamiya masking tape laid down on a sheet of glass then cut using a sharp scalpel.... giving me very sharp lines... the pix below do not do justice - they look terrible, but I am yet to block down the clear coat.... which will remove the over-spray of the masks. Now - for the "trouble" part of the build.... the chassis. Simply put - it's crap...... there is so much slop in the nylon rear axle mounts that they "float" around in it... the axles seem to be aluminum, but worse - the wheels have been pressed onto knurling ..... grrrr. Removing wheels from knurled axles - good luck. I decided that I'd bite the bullet here and turn some aluminium wheels..... the smallest I have ever attempted. Further, I decided (as I have done with other models with plastic wheels) I'd make a Pinkysil mould of the wheels, and turn down the castings from them to make inserts for the aluminium wheels.... My first attempt at turning such a small wheel was a failure - I destroyed all my good work getting the step and rim to spec when I tried to use my favourite tool for boring out the inside of the wheel for the insert.... I made up another boring tool by grinding yet another tungsten carbide cheapy down.... and went again - this time with success. The mould and casts from it went really well.... I managed to get the second wheel done as I wanted, and am now on #3 (of 9, #1 was discarded). With #3, I am changing my procudure... I set up the aluminium stock in the Mill and drill my grub screw hole to just short of where the axle will pass through. I then tap this hole to M2 and remove it for the lathe. I fit up the milled rod into the lathe and turn down the O.D. then the outer rim - and then drill the axle hole. Next I hand drill the remainder of the grub hole and tap it..... this avoids attempting to tap a hole half way between the inner rim diameter and the hub..... which tended to throw the tap to one side and go in "cocked". Next... I bore the recess out of the front for the insert.... And then turn down the inner rim and finally hub.... and part it away from the stock rod. The casting from my Pinkysil mould is then fitted up into the micro lathe I have inside the house - and I turn down casting to make a hub. I reverse the cast and fit the hub into the lathe.. and turn down the casting to match the diameter with that of the recess in the aluminium wheel.... finally, I part the cast off to the width of the recess in the wheel... and it becomes a press fit into the wheel..... Ok, some pix. I love the wheels that Scalextric have produced for this model - they are replica Mini Lite (unless told otherwise) and the "hands" look great. The detail also includes nuts, wheel mount nut and believe it or not! a valve stem... So, here is wheel #2... MJk produce their high quality tyres for these wheels.... ok hope pix came through.... Work continues... turning 8 wheels and inserts. frats, Rosco
  35. 3 points
    Always ready to run down under , even if it means nicking the missuse retirement fund for postage will support , have slot car will travel
  36. 3 points
    After sitting on the shelf for way too long I have started the build on the Elfin Mono. Inspired by FPR7 from 2017 Tasman proxy series I thought it appropriate that this little car should see the light of day, obviously still some way to go but the hard stuff has been done( I hope) and just now to do the suspension and paint, Thanks for this body Phil, Unlke my past Tasman cars this car features a Slimline chassis from Pendle, this chassis absolutely blitzed the field back in 2016( I think,) no doubt someone will correct me on that, the chassis is very easy to put together and fits this quite thin body nicely
  37. 3 points
    Looks good Printed the same one out as well, played with the slicer program and made it about 5mm wider Did the same for the XY, makes it easier to fit a few different chassis under it All these, and a lot more, have been packed away for the last few months, and are on the bottom of the list for unpacking after i move, but are all still on the to do list
  38. 3 points
    Thanks everyone for your messages they mean a lot. I'm OK just a bit shaken .If you don't already know I was robbed at BP petrol station today . After my experience and initial shock I managed to give the Police a report . Scared the absolute crap out of me . The police were quick to respond and calmed me down which was great because I lost my s#!t . My money's gone, however. The police asked me if I knew who did it and I told them, "Yes, it was pump number 1." Stay safe guys
  39. 3 points
  40. 3 points
    Hi folk, wow, have I hit the deck running - seven cars lined up on my workbench all demanding they get closer to completion.. and another three to come - what have I done? Whilst we were up north, I ordered an NSR GT40 mk 2... I am very impressed with NSR models, and I expect there will be more to come... I had a good look at how it was set up ex factory, and something just wasn't right - I could not get module/chassis float when the chassis was fitted to the body, but it was fine on the bench minus body. I took a very close look for anything which may have been fouling - and sadly, NSR have made the exact same mistake that I suffered with all my Slot-It GT40's... that blasted plastic engine and intake manifold - it fouls the motor pod.. As you can see in the pic above, the tab melt method of fitting components did not allow much room to decrease the depth of the plastic engine/intake... There certainly wasn't enough clearance to be gained by simply chomping into the body of it... so, my plan was to remove it and do some trimming - then fit it further up into the body... Another area which needed attention was the power leads to the motor - they were first point of contact between the pod and the body.... I de-soldered and re-fitted them so that the leads and terminal were not proud of the motor body... We can see in the pic below, that the factory placement sits very low in the body - and this fouls the chassis motor and pod... In the pic below, we can see that I have attacked the plastic severely, just barely avoiding breaking through to what will be visible through the rear window of the model. I have also cut away the front mount and opted to fit it flush with the body cowl, rather than have it mounted underneath - this combination gave me sufficient clearance for the motor and pod to float within the adjustment I have set this model up with... So, here we have the side-one pic with motor fitted... and if you compare the first pic to this one - you'll note that a considerable amount of adding clearance needed to be emplaced... So, with a bit of work adjusting float and truing in the tyres... this model is pretty much good to go - it did need a bit of work but I believe it will be one of the best performing GT-40's that I have... the bottom dwellers are the two Scalextric ones I purchased when I re-entered the hobby seven or eight years back... what was I thinking - a second hand "mint" GT-40 I "won" at auction... and paid $85 delivered from W.A....... Scalextric - it has never run correctly, nor did the one I bought direct from a retailer shortly after... then - I found Slot-It, and so commenced a long affair with collecting SI GT40's... eventually building a white kit one that I call "Godzilla" - almost impossible to drive - huge motor, very low gearing... I've learned a bit since way back then.... Ok... one down - 9 to go. Currently on the bench are three NSR 86/89 F1's, two NSR Moslers, a Mr Slotcar McLaren M6A, two T/slot McLaren Elva's, a T/Slot Lola T70, a Revo-Slot Porsche 911 GT-2 white kit, two Revo Porsche 911 GT2's, a Revo Dodge viper and of course - work continues on the LJ XU-1 build.. it has to be completed before Bathurst next year - the 50th anniversary of when PB took it over the finish line to claim his first Bathurst in 1972.. Ok, guess I'm back.... frats, Rosco
  41. 3 points
    A first look at some of our cars coming later this year! New POLICAR models, expected in Q2 2022: Lotus 72E - #1 - 1st Monaco GP 1974 driver: Ronnie Peterson code: CAR02g BRM P160 - #14 - 1st Spielberg GP 1971 driver: Jo Siffert code: CAR08a NEW MOULD prototype picture enclosed The BRM P160 was designed by Tony Southgate for British Racing Motors. Unlike many other British manufacturers, B.R.M. also built their own engines, in this case a 3 liters V12, which in the course of its career won four GPs overall. In this model, Policar reproduces the car that won the 1971 Austrian Grand Prix held on the Spielberg circuit in Styria, then known as the ÖsterreichRing. The exhausts of the V12 BRM are faithfully reproduced in 3D printing. Jo Siffert, a very fast and constant Suisse driver on both Formula and Sport cars, won this race, which was, unfortunately, his last victory. CAR08a http://catalog.slot.it/product/product-details/?id=4733 CAR02g http://catalog.slot.it/product/product-details/?id=4757
  42. 3 points
    Is that all you do to setup your car for a proxy? Now I know why it runs like it does.
  43. 3 points
    Just true the tyres and put on some soft braids and you should be fine.
  44. 3 points
    I think MJK's are one of the best all round tyre which work on plastic, ferrodor and gloss wood tracks with a nice balance between grip and slip. They are very easy to true and if your rims are round you can run them straight away without truing. Are you sure you are not mixing up silicone's with MJK's, silicone's are hard to true apparently.
  45. 3 points
    Not quite the record for old thread revival - funny to revive a thread to bag MJK tyres I use a heap of different tyres - my own home made Shore 40 urethanes - Paul Gage standard and XPG (never again with XPG) MJK, Frankenslot, Ortmanns, Slot Invasion, Supertyres and probably one or two others as well. MJK are fine tyres - they are nice and round and you can run them straight out of the packet no problem. They true up well and are comparable in performance to any of the other Urethane tyres out there. We run on MDF routed wood tracks and they hook up fine. cheers DM
  46. 3 points
    Direction: Yes, slot motors are directional, but not by design, just errors introduced by cheap manufacture. Most RTR cars run the motors clockwise. NSR are untypical that they run the king motors anti clockwise. Get a laser tachometer and test your motors, then install them in cars that are making the best use of any timing bias that exists in the motor. Orientation: Motors ARE often often designed to have an installation orientation, closed can side up or open can side up (see slot.it flatsix motor) Refer to DiSCA digital slot car for an example of rules designed to mimic the behaviour of the full size cars based on orientation. Refer to NSR's International GT3 rules . You will see that the orientation is specified by a red dot on the motor. The reasoning behind formalising the orientation, is that (on a track with steel rails or magnabraid) the motor orientation has an impact on magnetic downforce available from the flux leakage from the motor. Again, if your rules permit , figure out which side is sucking harder in the track and Install the motor to make the best of that. Alan
  47. 3 points
    Hi davo43,.........I forgot to give you one more thing to check/do If you are going to use the stock bushings, check for the following..........the molding process of the pod sometimes results in the plastic fingers of the bushing holders being a touch proud of the bushing faces,.....this is far from ideal as it adds friction, and reduces precision. The following pic., (albeit a Slot-it pod) illustrates this....... To rectify this,......remove the spherical bushings, and with a file/dremel disc, remove a few thou. from the outside edges of the fingers so the face of the bushing is just proud of the pod fingers....re install the bushings......now your spacers run on a smooth /finished surface....smoother/more precise !! The next stage is to glue the "self aligning"/ "self unaligning" bushings in place, which further improves precision by removing any slop in the pod/bushing interface. If you are interested in doing this let me know, and I can explain, but for now, my two typing fingers are getting tired. Cheers Chris Walker
  48. 3 points
  49. 3 points
    Agreed. I was quite the Nissan fan in the day. Perhaps Slot.it can do a VL SS Commodore? They can go chassis economy mode and also do the VK and VL Walkinshaw, all of which have European liveries to go with the multitude of Australian liveries. Now that era of Holden I would like to see. Those would sell well here in Aus.
  50. 3 points
    Still in the process of moving interstate, so i have paused printing car bodies for the time being, having enough to keep me busy for a year or so. I was looking at some of the buildings and came across one of my old Scalextric control towers So i decided to do a homegrown version Then i thought why stop there ....... Then it sort of got out of control a bit ...... Needed a communications array for these modern times I printed some signage for the front of the building, i originally was going to print it directly to the front and side sections but it works out easier to just print them separately and paint them to suite Found a free program AniConv, that allows you to convert most jpeg files into STL files for 3D printing, most of the ones above are from photos of logos, these are all on a 3D filament (plastic) printer, a resin printer would print them with far better detail. Having said that the plastic still turned out ok. Found the original speakers on Thingiverse, and printed out just fine. There's benches, tables and floors in each level, and only the side are glued together, the roofs come off and the levels can be separated to add figures and to run wires for lighting. As i said, only a little bit out of control, luckily it all the levels come apart for easy packing.
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