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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/17/2020 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Ok folk, bit more done..... car is now track ready.... as follows - Rear tyres glued with water based contact adhesive - then trued up. Radius made on outer tyre edges... Then I had some serious thinking to do - the front axle/wheels/tyres.... whether to true them up or not. In this model, the axle does not run in nylon bushes - but is pushed through a hole each side of the chassis - a bit of a disappointment. I had to decide on whether to remove a wheel - which I hate doing with platic wheels - or to cut into the chassis and remove the axle assembly intact... I chose to cut the chassis - and came up with a way which may prove useful to others who also do not want to pull wheels from axles.. I used a Dremel and cut a "keyhole" into the top of each side of the chassis. The axle was then able to be "sprung" out... intact. Not interfering with the circle chassis bush of the hole except for a small segment above the axle..... just enough to flex the chassis apart to free it.... With the axle out - I sanded off the black paint from the steel axle..... and loaded the assembly into my wheel truer... In this pic, you can see the small amount of cut-away in the chassis.... From the side... And here we have the front axle assembly in the machine - truing down the wheels and then tyres... again, gluing them to the wheels using water based contact adhesive. The front axle has been re-fitted and the chassis set up on the plate.... I have set the height of the front axle here.... and am about to make up some styrene card retainers for the inside of the chassis axle hole... On the plate - from the front.. In this pic, you can see that I have fabricated some axle retainers... in the same style as that cut into the chassis - except, they are mounted inverted. I used two laminations of 0.030" styrene card on each side... the axle "runs" in the hole .. which also lines up with that in the chassis - so, in effect - we have twice the thickness of plastic for the axle to use as a hard fitted bush.. With the axles, wheels and tyres all now set up on the plate - I now turn my attention to the terrible guide arrangement.. i simply don't like these "quick change" guides that Scalextric have taken a liking to use..... they flop all over the place... but, the saving grace is that the guide hole in the chassis is square to the set up plate.... so, we don't have to go and re-invent the post holder... pic.... And here is the top of the guide - you can see the molding pips in it - they result in a lot of the "wobble" these guides make .... but not all of it... In this pic, you can see that I've been in with some wet/dry and a rubbing block... removed the pips and left a nice flat turntable for the guide to pivot on... Next up - you can see the terrible amount of "post" that protrudes up through the post hole.... fitting the retaining screw leaves way too much clearance and the guide flops all over the place - up and down, tilting forward and back - and side to side...... I filed the top of the post so that the flat head of the retaining screw was an almost clearance free fit.... the guide now has barely any wobble or float in it.... I simply don't like this arrangement - but for club purposes - left it in there instead of replacing it with a Slot-It guide.... I detest the contact strips, which are sandwiched between the top of the braid and the turntable of the chassis.... Scalextric have completely lost the "KISS" principle here - but, I must say - it makes for quick changes of braid - not that any track owner should maintain their track so that people have to change braids often.... grrrrr And the Quick Change braid assembly..... it slides over the rear of the guide blade and pushes back once in position to retain it.... more room for things to "move" that should be firm and secure.... As stated, I don't like this - if anything can go wrong - it will.... and will usually do so at a critical opportunity. We can clearly see here the "sandwich" of the contact plate making contact with the top of the braid.... I much prefer the simple Slot-It alternative where an eyelet is pressed into the front of the guide.... and we have direct contact between the motor power lead and the braid.... The guide is now fitted to the chassis - and you can see that all five contact points (four tyres and braid) are all in the same plane on the set-up plate.. Ok, here's a little gem that I stole from my r/c helicopter hobby.... secret weapon for "lubricating" plastic on plastic....... 2B greylead pencil..... graphite, in short - but not in powder form... just a "wiping" of it on the mating surfaces. it neither attracts fluff/grit/crud nor goes hard... or ever seems to wear off..... it's lighter than can be measured and simply works a treat.... just "color in" the mating surfaces for a treat and forget option to any other form of lube... Ok - as far as I am prepared to go for now - the model is track ready.... I have run the motor with the model inverted for a few hours - and it now runs very sweetly indeed.. the first two hours were just at 3v... then a bit of up and down the register to 6V for the next hour whilst beavering away on another project. When I first ran the model on the bench, it took nearly 1.5V for the motor to turn the rear wheels.... after this bench running - it now begins to turn the rear wheels at just 0.5v and it will maintain that constant turning at this low voltage without any hesitation or fluctuation..... as stated, the next bit is to put some track together and give it a bedding in on its own four feet... And finally, we come to another secret weapon I employ - we go to an awful lot of effort to true up wheels and tyres.. then screw the model down onto the floor of a jewel case - not me! I make up some spacers to fit under the chassis - so that when the model is screwed down - the tyres are up and away from the floor of the case.... so too, the braid... I have yet to start applying Patto's decals - when I get my mitts on some Microsol and Microset (coming from WA, and the Isle of Wight at present).... So, for now - probably put this thread on hold until I have some more pix of the completed model - or, I get off my butt and put some track together... frats, Rosco
  2. 1 point
    I am amazed that Sydney solvents sold you MEK. I think Oz law is similar to NZ, and MEK is very popular for processing a few kinds of "non-generic pharmaceuticals", made from certain wild green vegetables grown in home hydroponic facilities commonly located in ceilings and garages, and in the bakehouses for Contact NP. When I worked for a chemical wholesaler 25 or so years back, we knew a few things we sold were used in "street pharma"; so eventually we worked out a system. When the dodgy customer came to the counter, employee #1 would nip out back to secure their requirements, and request employee #2 to watch the exit door from outside and get the number plate. As they left #2 would ring the local narc squad with the details and description of said dodgy fella. We would generally get an unofficial heads up on the very satisfying and often amusing outcomes. These fella are generally not that smart, and between police tails and known addresses of interest, we helped reduce the flow to the streets quite nicely. Unfortunately, they eventually caught on and began to secure their "purchases" overnight via burglary, without bothering to engage with staff or make payment.
  3. 1 point
    Some great tips here thanks for posting.
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